Business and Leadership

American mothers are household CFOs, in charge of an estimated $2.45 trillion in direct spending. They are also an important influence on other family members' buying habits. Many organizations have identified moms as an important customer group, but the broad, age-based definitions these companies work with mask an array of different consumer behaviors. Written by two leading marketers, this book provides a new approach to understanding the “American Mom” market, examining the effect of age of the eldest child on women’s values and attitudes to food, exercise, education, health, technology, and fashion. The authors examine the mom’s influence on (or control of) the purchasing habits of children of all ages; from infants and toddlers to young adults. In doing so, it brings focus to the frequently-overlooked purchase influence of moms on teenagers.The authors combine large scale quantitative research of more than 4,700 mothers with qualitative case studies from individual participants. The authors also draw on decades of real-world experience to combine their research with implementable examples of best practice. Highly recommended for practitioners in retailing and product development, this book will also be a valuable supplemental text for college courses in consumer behavior and marketing strategy.
This authoritative study explores the scientific and mathematical cultural milieu that patterns much of the Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges's narrative design. Although criticism of Borges's fiction and essays has long emphasized philosophical traditions, Merrell expands the context of this interrogation of traditions by revealing how early twentieth-century and contemporary mathematics and physics also participated in a similar exploration
This volume addresses the challenges faced by value-added networking and innovation, both for firms' strategies and public policies in a context increasingly influenced by dynamics of interacting networks that underlie knowledge, creation, diffusion, and utilization. Part one deals with national institutions and policies to support science, networking, and innovation, ranging from legislation affecting university business relationships, national support systems for high-technology firms, to systems through which country brands can be developed. Part two addresses the need for value-added learning by local and regional governments concerning the building of an innovation system and the adoption of new ICT applications in cities. Part three focuses on firms, their management and strategies, and their performance in terms of innovativeness and growth.
When Every Day Is Saturday is a how-to book to plan for a happy, meaningful retirement. The Grace Retirement Inventory sets a fast opening pace and prompts thoughtful, focused questions about retirement. Some retirees seem to have failed badly while many others appear to be happy and successful. What was their guide to success? Dr. Grace's research with seven hundred retirees differentiates this book from all others. Six central themes are developed: 1) freedom and leisure, 2) financial independence, 3) separation from work, 4) family and friends, 5) health, and 6) helping others. Readers evaluate their attitude toward each of these themes and this simple measure predicts their happiness in retirement. The writing is concise, interspersed with comments and stories from the lives of current retirees. Inclusion of these vignettes adds hope, inspiration, and a dash of realism to what lies ahead for every working adult.
Our dominant culture continues to celebrate blind economic expansion despite its heavy toll on people and nature all over the globe. In fact, our national income accounts (such as the GDP) and our policies ignore that much of today's economic income stems from liquidating our social and natural assets. While living on the planet's capital, rather than on the interest (or sustainable harvest) of its renewable assets, we operate as if we could transgress ecological limits forever. Rather than acknowledging this ecological reality, we actively resist recognizing biophysical limits and use wealth to temporarily shield ourselves from the fallout of ecological over-shoot. This study addresses the core question of sustainability and shows why nations will also secure their future competitiveness if they improve their ecological performance. Taken together, all the countries studied consume approximately one-third more ecological services than their available ecological capacity can provide, suggesting that the global economy as a whole is poorly positioned for future competition. Still we find that the European countries, Japan , and Canada (this last because of its large ecological remainder) are in distinctly more favorable starting positions for future competitiveness than all the other countries. They are better at using fewer resources to produce commodities, and, in the case of the countries with ecological remainders, they take better care of their existing ecological capacities. Perhaps the most significant-cant finding is that 16 of the 20 eco-efficiency leaders (about 80 percent) are competitive, compared to only 11 of the 24 eco-efficiency laggards (about 45 percent). This suggests either that eco-efficiency already offers a competitive edge or that competitiveness and high eco-efficiency are not mutually exclusive.
Without Covers:// literary_magazines@the_digital_edge is a unique insider's look at how literary magazines have adapted to the arrival of the Internet age. Written by editors, writers, and poets, this authoritative collection covers a range of topics - from the overall financial challenges to the more mundane question of how to number the initial online volume of a 30-year old journal.Nineteen essays delve into the philosophical and practical issues surrounding the digital transformation of a variety of literary magazines. Essays include: "What is a Book?" "From Mimeograph to html: Literary Magazines Online," "the Editor in an Internet Age," "Epublishing and Literature: Challenge and Opportunity," "The Literary Magazine, the Web, and the Changing of the Avant-Garde," and much more.
Without Covers:// literary_magazines@the_digital_edge is a unique insider's look at how literary magazines have adapted to the arrival of the Internet age. Written by editors, writers, and poets, this authoritative collection covers a range of topics - from the overall financial challenges to the more mundane question of how to number the initial online volume of a 30-year old journal.
Throughout history, women have struggled to change the workplace, change government, change society. So what’s next? It’s time for women to change the world! Whether on the job, in politics, or in their community, there has never been a better time for women to make a difference in the world, contends author, mentor, and corporate pioneer Susan Bulkeley Butler in Women Count: A Guide to Changing the World.   Through her experience as the first female partner of a major consulting firm and founder of the Susan Bulkeley Butler Institute for the Development of Women Leaders, Butler’s unique insights have changed the lives of countless women. In Women Count, she shows readers how to change the world through a series of inspiring case studies that chronicle how she and other pioneering women in a range of fields have done so in years past. Women represent half of the country’s population, half of the country’s college graduates, and around 50 percent of the country’s workforce. Butler envisions a day when they will also make up their fair share of elected and appointed positions, including in corporate boardrooms.   Amid financial meltdowns, wars, and societal struggles, never before has the world so greatly needed the unique abilities of women to lead the way. But as history has shown, to make change, women must step into their power and become “women who count,” Butler contends. Then and only then, she argues, can women truly change the world.