Education

Disturbed by acrimonious arguments about the value of humanistic education, the authors-former colleagues and university-press board members-embarked on an ambitious project to reexamine a number of major literary and philosophical works dealing with the liberal arts and education. With their discussions ranging from Plat to Rousseau, from Cicero to Vico, from Erasmus to Matthew Arnold, Sousa and Weinsheimer offer not a history of education philosophy but an examination of the present. They read these astonishingly diverse works with one question foremost: "Do our predecessors' reflections offer anything better in defense of humanities education than modern platitudes about broadening one's horizons?"
The tablet PC and similar pen-based devices are being embraced by a wide variety of disciplines as tools for the radical enhancement of teaching and learning. Deployments of Tablet PCs span all the K-12, higher education, and graduate levels and deal with an amazingly diverse range of subject areas, including geology, writing, mathematics, computer science, Japanese language, physics, engineering, business, economics, and technical communications. Despite the diversity of content areas, many deployments generate a singular passion among students and teachers. In April of 2006, a group of educators gathered to exchange ideas at the First Workshop on the Impact of Pen-based Technology on Education (WIPTE). The editors have selected a subset of papers that were presented at WIPTE for inclusion in this book. The papers have been selected for their broad appeal, diverse content, and insightful evaluations. The collective experiences of these authors will help the reader to identify best practices with regard to the educational use of pen-based computing.
A wide variety of disciplines are embracing Tablet PC's and similar pen-based devices as tools for the radical enhancement of teaching and learning. Deployments of Tablet PCs have spanned the K-12, undergraduate, and graduate levels and have dealt with an amazingly diverse range of subject areas. This work is aimed at identifying best practices in the educational use of pen-based computing so that all educators may benefit from this next generation of technology.
A wide variety of disciplines are embracing tablet PCs and similar pen-based devices as tools for the radical enhancement of teaching and learning. Deployments of tablet PCs have spanned the K-12, undergraduate, and graduate levels and have dealt with an amazingly diverse range of subject areas including: nursing, veterinary science, geology, ethno-musicology, anthropology, landscape architecture, writing, and mathematics, as well as others. Despite the diversity of content areas, many deployments have been similar in terms of the passion they have generated among students and teachers. This work stems from the third Workshop on the Impact of Pen-based Technology on Education.
A wide variety of disciplines are embracing tablet PCs and similar pen- based devices as tools for the radical enhancement of teaching and learning. Deployments of tablet PCs have spanned the K-12, undergraduate, and graduate levels, and have dealt with an amazingly diverse range of subject areas including nursing, veterinary science, geology, ethno-musicology, anthropology, landscape architecture, writing, mathematics, computer science, Japanese language, physics, engineering, art, economics, as well as others. Despite the diversity of content areas, many deployments have been similar in terms of the passion they have generated among students and teachers. This work, stemming from the Fourth Workshop on the Impact of Pen-based Technology on Education, will help the reader appreciate this passion.
A wide variety of disciplines are embracing tablet PCs and similar pen-based devices as tools for the radical enhancement of teaching and learning. Deployments of tablet PCs have spanned the K-12, undergraduate, and graduate levels and have dealt with an amazingly diverse range of subject areas including nursing, veterinary science, geology, ethno-musicology, anthropology, landscape architecture, writing, mathematics, computer science, Japanese language, physics, engineering, art, economics, as well as others. Despite the diversity of content areas, many deployments have been similar in terms of the passion they have generated among students and teachers. This work, stemming from the Fifth Workshop on the Impact of Pen-Based Technology on Education (WIPTE), will help the reader appreciate this passion. Each chapter consists of a refereed paper contributed by an author with experience deploying tablet PCs to support teaching and learning. Each author’s experiences are presented along with the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the approach.
Virginia Claypool Meredith's role in directly managing the affairs of a large and prosperous farm in east-central Indiana opened doors that were often closed to women in late nineteenth century America. Her status allowed her to campaign for the education of women, in general, and rural women, in particular. While striving to change society's expectations for women, she also gave voice to the important role of women in the home. A lifetime of dedication made Virginia Meredith "the most remarkable woman in Indiana" and the "Queen of American Agriculture." Meredith was also an integral part of the history of Purdue University. She was the first woman appointed to serve on the university's board of trustees, had a residence hall named in her honor, and worked with her adopted daughter, Mary L. Matthews, in creating the School of Home Economics at Purdue University.
This volume addresses the challenges faced by value-added networking and innovation, both for firms' strategies and public policies in a context increasingly influenced by dynamics of interacting networks that underlie knowledge, creation, diffusion, and utilization. Part one deals with national institutions and policies to support science, networking, and innovation, ranging from legislation affecting university business relationships, national support systems for high-technology firms, to systems through which country brands can be developed. Part two addresses the need for value-added learning by local and regional governments concerning the building of an innovation system and the adoption of new ICT applications in cities. Part three focuses on firms, their management and strategies, and their performance in terms of innovativeness and growth.
Throughout history, women have struggled to change the workplace, change government, change society. So what’s next? It’s time for women to change the world! Whether on the job, in politics, or in their community, there has never been a better time for women to make a difference in the world, contends author, mentor, and corporate pioneer Susan Bulkeley Butler in Women Count: A Guide to Changing the World.   Through her experience as the first female partner of a major consulting firm and founder of the Susan Bulkeley Butler Institute for the Development of Women Leaders, Butler’s unique insights have changed the lives of countless women. In Women Count, she shows readers how to change the world through a series of inspiring case studies that chronicle how she and other pioneering women in a range of fields have done so in years past. Women represent half of the country’s population, half of the country’s college graduates, and around 50 percent of the country’s workforce. Butler envisions a day when they will also make up their fair share of elected and appointed positions, including in corporate boardrooms.   Amid financial meltdowns, wars, and societal struggles, never before has the world so greatly needed the unique abilities of women to lead the way. But as history has shown, to make change, women must step into their power and become “women who count,” Butler contends. Then and only then, she argues, can women truly change the world.  
Ample evidence has been provided that women historically have suffered numerous social, political, and institutional barriers to their entrance and success in the sciences. The articles in this anthology refocus the discussion and reflect the interdisciplinary nature of the issues surrounding women in the sciences. While the barriers that women have faced as researchers, subjects of research, students of science, and theorists have been well documented, this anthology breaks new ground. It presents the ways women succeed in the sciences, overcome these historical barriers, and contribute to the social practice of science and the philosophy of science in both theory and practice