Finance

Provides a practical approach to creating and implementing cost-effective business process, focusing on key elements of a robust business plan. Defines core business processes needed in a successful process-driven organization, and offers checklists of essential criteria for designing the process. Contains chapters on customer development, the production introduction process, and supply chain, project, and finance management. The author has worked with leading aerospace, automotive, and industrial component manufacturers
Although many might argue that program management is magic or luck, and at times this might be the case, Springer instead describes program management as both an art and a science. The art of program management is addressed through the numerous qualitative aspects of dealing with people, working in teams, understanding what motivates people, and gaining an understanding how we manage. The quantitative side is composed of a process with multiple activities with clear-cut outcomes. The integration of the multiple activities and outcomes provides a powerful framework for successfully planning a program. Program Management: A Comprehensive Overview of the Discipline, doing what no other book has done, integrates and depicts each of the many program activities, art and science, into a well-defined sequence for creating a successful program plan. Program management is not reserved for multi-million dollar programs with strategic governmental or defense implications. The process presented by the author can be applied to any project, whether it be building a garage or planting a garden. The examples presented provide a clear and concise picture of the complete set of activities, how the responsible parties interact and which outcomes are desired for each activity.
From his years of experience and an exhaustive study of the program planning literature, Mitchell Springer has ascertained that the program planning process is made up of four key elements-program organization planning, schedule planning, cost planning, and performance planning. Program organization planning is the process that establishes the planning, program organizations, and the definition of the work to be performed. Schedule planning provides the time frame for resource allocation, establishes a baseline for the current status, and forecasts of completion dates for scheduled work. Cost planning establishes a preliminary budget to use to track and compare against actual costs. Performance planning is the identification and subsequent documentation of the technical performance requirements.
The program planning process is made up of four key elements: program organization planning, schedule planning, cost planning, and performance planning. The key to understanding and quantifying programs is coming to the realization that program progress is both sequential at the micro-level and nonlinear at the macro-level. The four primary phases of the management process, planning execution, analysis, and adjustment may be performed at the same time because different activities within the program advance at varying rates. Also provided are several tools to help process evaluation, including sample questionnaires, a research observation form, and data mapping instruments.
Scholars from different disciplines and perspectives increasingly recognize that modern regional economic growth critically depends on factors like active networking, favorable institutions, entrepreneurial spirit and a fast production and circulation of knowledge. Regional Development and Conditions for Innovation in the Network Society is organized in three main parts. Part I, titled "Emerging Concepts and Approaches," has four chapters that focus on the key concepts of innovation and sustainability and on evolutionary thinking. In addition, an overall picture is given of approaches to innovation in a spatial context and to regional policymaking. Part II, titled "Telecom Infrastructures Strategies and Implications," has five chapters with a focus on the adoption strategy of ICT by various governments and on implications of ICT use on housing and production. Part III, "Conditions for Networks, Entrepreneurship and Development of High-Tech Clusters," contains seven chapters, each with a focus on requirements for high-technology based economic growth, such as technology competence, job features, the role of change agents, venture capital and specific networking.
St. Benedict's Rule is one of a handful of documents, such as the Magna Carta and U.S. Constitution, that make up the foundation of Western civilization. Benedict's Rule is an organizational blueprint for success and Benedict's original organization is the oldest in the world (over 1500 years). The beauty of The Rule is its organizational genius, which has wide application beyond monastic groups.The Rule is a basic textbook to create and maintain effective organizations. It offers today's reader insights into some of the most difficult resource management in business. The Rule is a guide to success for entrepreneurs, managers, and everyone in the world of business. St. Benedict's Rule for Business Success is must reading for entrepreneurs, managers, and business. Furthermore, it is great for anyone wanting to develop effective organizations, from church groups to Girl Scouts.
Every family should have financial goals for the future. Being unprepared can lead to monetary chaos. Financial Management of Your Future deals with strategies for accomplishing financial goals. What investment returns are necessary to achieve explicit family goals? How are returns logically related to risks for investment opportunities that are considered? Can different families have different tolerances for experiencing investment risk? Why is asset allocation the key investment decision for most families? What are the characteristics and valuations of bonds, stocks, mutual funds, real estate and international securities that a family might consider? How should a family construct, monitor, and revise a portfolio of investments over time? How should careful estate planning be done by a family in order to delay or avoid taxes in passing on property to their children, grandchildren, and favorite charities? And how can some of the concepts and techniques from "modern portfolio theory" be helpful to a family as it attempts to answer these question age their financial resources during their accumulation and retirement years? The book deals with financial strategies for three adult age categories-(1)Families of ages twenty to forty in the earlier years of active employment, child raising, and the beginning of saving for retirement; (2)Families of ages forty to sixty in their years of maximum income, high educational expenses for their children, and more serious thinking about forthcoming retirement; and(3) families of ages sixty to eighty having retired or approaching full retirement.
Leadership of the future requires you go beyond the numbers. By linking the ancient past with the present and the East with the West, Donald Cyr puts leadership in a global perspective.The Art of Global Thinking shows how the ancient myths from the hunting societies of the West and the planting societies of the East have been transformed to today's corporate boardroom and business practices. The book takes an innovative approach to link the "Individual Self" from the West and the "Civic Self" from the East to emotional intelligence, leadership style, and corporate performance. In doing so, the book links our two contrasting but complementary capabilities for logic and intuition, individualism and collectivism, and distinctiveness and harmony.The Art of Global Thinking draws from the insight of mythology, philosophy, religion, and ancient writing and fuses modern research, cultural difference and business know-how to suggest an innovative approach to leadership. It looks at Eastern and Western values not as different, but rather as complementary, and shows how each serves to define and enhance the other.
Drawn from the "Alice McDermott Memorial Lectures in Applied Ethics" held at the United States Air Force Academy, these 20 essays contribute to our understanding of ethics and leadership. Contributions come from a distinguished and diverse group of individuals including, Allan Bloom, Reverend Edward A. Malloy, John T. Noonan, Jr., James F. Childress, Christina Hoff Sommers, General Ronald R. Fogelman, and William J. Bennett. The range of topics include moral certainty and sensibility, professional and personal integrity, emergency ethics and the responsibility of war criminals, the just war and public policy, unethical adversaries and military obligation, and liberal education and character.
Examines the economic development of the United States from colonial times through the mid-Twentieth Century and uses elementary economic analysis as a tool for illuminating historical events and their economic origins and consequences. It will consider how the economy has grown over time as well as how and why the structure of the American economy has changed over time. Throughout American economic history various public and private policies have at times been successful and at other times failed. Accordingly the prevailing theme of economic history can be expressed as the idea that any particular policy is not destined to succeed or fail but rather that there are always viable choices. Indeed, economic history is a record of those choices and their effects. The aim of this course is not to provide you with conventional and one-dimensional interpretations but rather to offer you alternative economic views of historical events. Ideally this course will help you understand and apply economic analysis to historical events as well as to ascertain probable implications for current and future policies.
This volume addresses the challenges faced by value-added networking and innovation, both for firms' strategies and public policies in a context increasingly influenced by dynamics of interacting networks that underlie knowledge, creation, diffusion, and utilization. Part one deals with national institutions and policies to support science, networking, and innovation, ranging from legislation affecting university business relationships, national support systems for high-technology firms, to systems through which country brands can be developed. Part two addresses the need for value-added learning by local and regional governments concerning the building of an innovation system and the adoption of new ICT applications in cities. Part three focuses on firms, their management and strategies, and their performance in terms of innovativeness and growth.
When Every Day Is Saturday is a how-to book to plan for a happy, meaningful retirement. The Grace Retirement Inventory sets a fast opening pace and prompts thoughtful, focused questions about retirement. Some retirees seem to have failed badly while many others appear to be happy and successful. What was their guide to success? Dr. Grace's research with seven hundred retirees differentiates this book from all others. Six central themes are developed: 1) freedom and leisure, 2) financial independence, 3) separation from work, 4) family and friends, 5) health, and 6) helping others. Readers evaluate their attitude toward each of these themes and this simple measure predicts their happiness in retirement. The writing is concise, interspersed with comments and stories from the lives of current retirees. Inclusion of these vignettes adds hope, inspiration, and a dash of realism to what lies ahead for every working adult.
Our dominant culture continues to celebrate blind economic expansion despite its heavy toll on people and nature all over the globe. In fact, our national income accounts (such as the GDP) and our policies ignore that much of today's economic income stems from liquidating our social and natural assets. While living on the planet's capital, rather than on the interest (or sustainable harvest) of its renewable assets, we operate as if we could transgress ecological limits forever. Rather than acknowledging this ecological reality, we actively resist recognizing biophysical limits and use wealth to temporarily shield ourselves from the fallout of ecological over-shoot. This study addresses the core question of sustainability and shows why nations will also secure their future competitiveness if they improve their ecological performance. Taken together, all the countries studied consume approximately one-third more ecological services than their available ecological capacity can provide, suggesting that the global economy as a whole is poorly positioned for future competition. Still we find that the European countries, Japan , and Canada (this last because of its large ecological remainder) are in distinctly more favorable starting positions for future competitiveness than all the other countries. They are better at using fewer resources to produce commodities, and, in the case of the countries with ecological remainders, they take better care of their existing ecological capacities. Perhaps the most significant-cant finding is that 16 of the 20 eco-efficiency leaders (about 80 percent) are competitive, compared to only 11 of the 24 eco-efficiency laggards (about 45 percent). This suggests either that eco-efficiency already offers a competitive edge or that competitiveness and high eco-efficiency are not mutually exclusive.
Throughout history, women have struggled to change the workplace, change government, change society. So what’s next? It’s time for women to change the world! Whether on the job, in politics, or in their community, there has never been a better time for women to make a difference in the world, contends author, mentor, and corporate pioneer Susan Bulkeley Butler in Women Count: A Guide to Changing the World.   Through her experience as the first female partner of a major consulting firm and founder of the Susan Bulkeley Butler Institute for the Development of Women Leaders, Butler’s unique insights have changed the lives of countless women. In Women Count, she shows readers how to change the world through a series of inspiring case studies that chronicle how she and other pioneering women in a range of fields have done so in years past. Women represent half of the country’s population, half of the country’s college graduates, and around 50 percent of the country’s workforce. Butler envisions a day when they will also make up their fair share of elected and appointed positions, including in corporate boardrooms.   Amid financial meltdowns, wars, and societal struggles, never before has the world so greatly needed the unique abilities of women to lead the way. But as history has shown, to make change, women must step into their power and become “women who count,” Butler contends. Then and only then, she argues, can women truly change the world.