Forestry

Native Trees of the Midwest is a definitive guide to identifying trees in Indiana and surrounding states, written by three leading forestry experts. Descriptive text explains how to identify every species in any season and color photographs show all important characteristics. Not only does the book allow the user to identify trees and learn of their ecological and distributional attributes, but it also presents an evaluation of each species relative to its potential ornamental value for those interested in landscaping. Since tree species have diverse values to wildlife, an evaluation of wildlife uses is presented with a degree of detail available nowhere else. The revised and expanded second edition contains a chapter on introduced species that have become naturalized and invasive throughout the region. All accounts have been reviewed and modifications made when necessary to reflect changes in taxonomy, status, or wildlife uses. Keys have been modified to incorporate introduced species.   An interview with the authors is available on YouTube.
Photographing Turkey Run: A Guide to Nature Photography was written to be used in conjunction with Daniel P. Shepardson’s A Place Called Turkey Run: A Celebration of Indiana’s Second State Park in Photographs and Words. This guide contains tips and techniques designed to provide a basic understanding of how to photograph nature and improve one’s photography skills.    
As the definitive identification guide to the shrubs and woody vines of Indiana, this book also provides coverage of 90% of the species to be found in surrounding Midwestern US states. As well as covering indigenous species, it also includes all currently known invasive shrubs. Written by two leading experts in plant taxonomy, the guide is prepared in the same attractive, easy-to-use format as the bestselling Native Trees of the Midwest. Descriptive text explains how to identify every species in any season, and original color photographs taken by Sally Weeks detail all important characteristics. The authors provide practical guidance concerning the potential ornamental value of each species for those interested in landscaping and also evaluate their potential value for encouraging wildlife. Designed for experts in natural resource management as well as the interested general public, the volume includes distribution maps, identification keys, and an index of both common and Latin names.  
Assuming you don't want your cabinets, RTA furniture or other products made from plywood to smell like dirty diapers, a quick look at A hardwood plywood manual by Ang Schramm is in order.According to Schramm, South American Lapuna Sumauma wood has a high starch content that is susceptible to attack by anaerobic bacteria while sitting on the bottoms of holding ponds at the veneer plant. The byproducts, butyric acid and caproic acid, exude an odor that may not always be noticeable in properly dried wood in dry conditions, but becomes offensive when humidity increases.As can be expected, veneer from this species is in low demand, therefore cheap, and manufacturers buying on price point alone can find themselves in possession of a product whose odor is, at this time, irreversible and without remedy.Not all of A Hardwood Plywood Manual is so esoteric. The book's 157 pages are organized into sections covering variations in appearance, the veneer manufacturing process, types of veneer matching, grades and product standard, substrates, the hardwood plywood manufacturing process, meeting customer expectations and troubleshooting common problems.Liberally sprinkled with black-and-white photographs and diagrams, the book gives excellent detail on describing, the processes of plywood and veneer manufacturing so the reader can better understand the advantages and limitations of the product and the various processes.For instance, the chapter on troubleshooting provides a diagram showing why one side of veneer (tight side) is more heat-reflective and impervious to finish than is the other (loose) side, which is more light-refractive and absorbent.By understanding the relative differences between the sides and why those differences exist, it is then possible to present an explanation why starch book-matching veneers has the problem of adjacent sheets of veneer having different light-reflecting/refracting and finish absorbing characteristics.The manual can then proceed to explain different techniques to overcome the variation and present a more uniform appearance: in this case, glue-sizing or wash coating, and to recommend specific products to help achieve the desired result.
A recent history of plant science, this compilation of lectures was initially presented at the 1991 Plant Science Lecture Series, sponsored by Iowa State University. The eight scholars featured are key contributors to plant science over the past 50 years.   Scientists often get so engrossed in the day-to-day and month-to-month activities of their research programs and professional endeavors that they fail to record and interpret the chronology of events that lead to great scientific discoveries and advances in using science for the benefit of humankind. Iowa State University, through the sponsorship of the Department of Agronomy, Botany, Forestry, Horticulture, and Plant Pathology, presents an annual Plant Science Lecture Series, which provides the opportunity for outstanding scholars to share their knowledge and expertise in an atmosphere of intellectual camaraderie.   Historical Perspectives in Plant Science is a compilation of the 1991 lectures presented for the series and provides a unique look at plant science history via anecdotes and personal knowledge about research failures and successes, cooperation and competition among scientists, and the interplay of discoveries in the several disciplines encompassed by the field of plant science. It provides a benchmark, as of 1991, for the history of plant science as seen, experienced, and interpreted by eight scholars who played significant roles in "making plant science history."   The areas of research covered range from a general overview of plant science to the development of the history of plant physiology, plant pathology, quantitative genetics, and cytogenetics to molecular biology to the history of plant breeding methology and accomplishments.