Global Languages and Literatures

This is the first book of interviews with prominent black women scientists across the United States. These black women scientists are pioneers in their chosen scientific profession and represent a broad spectrum of disciplines, ages, and geographical locations. Each interview allows the reader to delve into the soul of the scientist, to experience her challenges, and to witness her triumphs despite obstacles.
The people and creatures in "The Ones Consumed" become absorbed-figuratively or literally-by the world around them. Though the absorption often destroys them, the section opens and closes with poems which reveal the can be compensation and justice in the process. "Separate States" deals with the experiences of those who find themselves cut off from the lives most familiar to them. This separation results in their gaining knowledge stronger and deeper than the kind offered by the surfaces of the commonplace. Isolation has more severe physical and emotional consequences for the people of the poems in "Scars of What Touches." Even when someone chooses isolation, as in the final poem of the section, the presence of the outside world forces itself past the barriers erected against its intrusion. The last section, "Shaped by Shells and journeys," is peopled by those who find reason for hope, even though the innocence of an earlier age has vanished for them. They accept the limitation that the only part of their world they can truly change is themselves, and this releases them from the isolation which wounds or destroys so many in the earlier sections. It is thus at the final poem transforms a scene of unthinking devastation into one where the poet alters the way he will five from that time on.
As J. J. Gittes once remarked, summer colds are the worst. The most I can offer today is a link to an old Slate piece, which I've added to the "Literary" category of my archive. The subject is Wallace Stevens. Re-reading the piece, I asked myself: Is Orangeade that old? It is
In a world of increasing conformity, the modern eccentric can be seen as a contemporary hero and guardian of individualism. This study defines the modern eccentric intwentieth-century French literature and compares the notions of the eccentric in nineteenthand twentieth-century French literature by tracing the eccentric's relationship to time, space, and society. While previous studies have focused on the notion of eccentricity in purely formal terms, The Sunday of Fiction delineates the eccentric as a fully fictional character. This work also completes prior criticism by exploring twentieth-century fictional eccentrics in works by authors such as Raymond Queneau, Jean-Echenoz, Jean-Philippe Toussaint, and Georges Perec, and by filmmakers such as Jacques Tati and Pierre Etaix. Notions of eccentricity since the nineteenth century shift from rather foppish, outlandish representations of aristocratic eccentrics towards a more popular, discreet figure who is uniquely in tune with vanishing spaces of daily life: amusement parks, cafes, grand movie palaces. While the modern world around them is obsessed with speed, technology, and innovation, modern French eccentrics view daily life as a sort of holiday to be savored. In thisway, The Sunday of Fiction details the various means modern eccentrics employ to successfully transform the humdrum into the marvelous, or rather Mondays into Sundays.
Eliot is a disconcerting writer.  Though trained in philosophy, he spoke repeatedly of his incapacity for abstruse reasoning, as well as noting such  other shortcomings as his incompetence and lack of interest in aesthetics.  When in 1964 he published Knowledge and Experience in the Philosophy of F. H. Bradley, he professed not to understand it and presented it only as a curiosity of biographical interest which shows how his own prose style was formed on that of Bradley.  These curios statements have served to reinforce the common assumption that Eliot left his philosophy in his dissertation or that, in any event, with the supervention of religion he went blind in his philosophic eye.   The consequence has been, as The Critic as Philosopher shows, that Eliot and his commentators have been talking at cross-purposes.  Moreover, commentators who ignore or discount Eliot's Bradleyan philosophy cannot as a rule find a meaning for the language of the critical prose - either Eliot does not mean what he says of what he says does not mean anything.  Lewis Freed's study reveals, on the positive side, that the critical prose - reviews, prefaces, essays, lectures - is informed by a definite theory of philosophy, and it is the same theory or philosophy in the later as in the earlier prose.  Eliot chose to preserve his philosophy in cryptogram, and The Critic as Philosopher explains how he uses his philosophy without exposing it.  In this sense, the present work is a study of Eliot's habits of prose composition - his "style."
In her book, The Closed Hand: Images of the Japanese in Modern Peruvian Literature, Rebecca Riger Tsurumi captures the remarkable story behind the changing human landscape in Peru at the end of the nineteenth century when Japanese immigrants established what would become the second largest Japanese community in South America. She analyzes how non-Japanese Peruvian narrators unlock the unspoken attitudes and beliefs about the Japanese held by mainstream Peruvian society, as reflected in works written between l966 and 2006. Tsurumi explores how these Peruvian literary giants, including Mario Vargas Llosa, Miguel Gutiérrez, Alfredo Bryce Echenique, Carmen Ollé, Pilar Dughi, and Mario Bellatin, invented Japanese characters whose cultural differences fascinated and confounded their creators. She compares the outsider views of these Peruvian narrators with the insider perceptions of two Japanese Peruvian poets, José Watanabe and Doris Moromisato, who tap personal experiences and memories to create images that define their identities.   The book begins with a brief sociohistorical overview of Japan and Peru, describing the conditions in both nations that resulted in Japanese immigration to Peru and concluding in contemporary times. Tsurumi traces the evolution of the terms “Orient” and “Japanese/Oriental” and the depiction of Asians in Modernista poetry and in later works by Octavio Paz and Jorge Luis Borges. She analyzes the images of the Japanese portrayed in individual works of modern Peruvian narrative, comparing them with those created in Japanese Peruvian poetry. The book concludes with an appendix containing excerpts from Tsurumi’s interviews and correspondence in Spanish with writers and poets in Lima and Mexico City.
In poems that are at once colloquial and elegant, Perillo strives to bridge the gap between the exuberant voice of the streets and the rarefied voice of literary tradition. Using the long lines and narrative style that have been identified with some of the finest male poets of our times, Perillo tells the stories of female experience with a grim eye for the comic and an ear turned to language's highest pitch.
In 1948, the noted book designer and Purdue alumnus Bruce Rogers wrote a book that documented and illustrated his creation of the Centaur typeface. The book was privately printed by Rogers himself under the name of his studio, October House. This limited edition of the book was transferred to the Purdue Libraries at the time of his death along with his other papers and books. Over the years the remaining stock has found its home in the Special Collections of the Libraries. And although known as something of a collector's item by those who are aware of the few copies in circulation, it is here available to the general market for the first time. Centaur Types is a fascinating book for several reasons: in the designer's own words, we learn of the evolution of the typeface and of his interest in the art and craft of creating type; it demonstrates different and comparable typefaces, and gives examples of Centaur from six to seventy-two point; and lastly, it stands as a fitting example of fine book-making from one of the master book designers of his time.
A collection of essays studying the short stories of Henry James from 1843 to 1916. As a tribute to their professor, William T. Stafford, Joseph Dewey and Brooke Horrath gathered a contentious lot of essayists who take provocative stands and dare us to re-encounter Henry James.
Great people lead great universities. Purdue University is fortunate to count its thirteenth faculty member, William Carroll Latta, as one of those people. Certainly, thirteen proved to be a lucky number for Purdue and agriculture in Indiana. This book recounts William Latta's far-reaching influence on agriculture at the university, throughout Indiana, and on a national level. Recognized as the Father of the School of Agriculture and of Extension at Purdue, Latta was an early and tireless promoter of the university and what it could do for the people of the state. From developing the four-year agriculture program, to conducting practical agricultural research prior to the creation of Purdue's Agricultural Experiment Station, to leading Purdue's agricultural outreach efforts to bring the university to the people, Latta's contributions are still evident in Purdue's modern-day agricultural programs. Latta's story traces the history of agriculture at Purdue, showing agriculturists, historians, and the Purdue community where we've been and the foundation upon which we continue to build today's teaching, research, and Extension programs.
Philippe Codde provides a comparative cultural analysis of the unprecedented success of the Jewish novel in the postwar United States by situating the process and event in the context of three closely-related American cultural movements: the popularity in the US of French philosophical and literary existentialism, the increasing visibility of the Holocaust in US-American life, and the advent of radical theology. Codde argues that the literary repertoire of the postwar Jewish novel consists of an amalgam of these cultural elements that were making their mark in the political, religious, and philosophical systems of the United States at the time, and that this explains, in part, the Jewish novel’s sweeping success in the American literary system.
A biography of noted businessman John Purdue (1802-1876), whose donations of time and money led to the founding of Indiana's land grant university-Purdue University-in 1869. Purdue also contributed to economically important bridge, railroad, and cemetery construction, the existence of Lafayette Savings Bank and the Battle Ground Collegiate Institute, cattle farming, Lafayette's public school system, and countless other worthy enterprises. To date there has been no published full length study of Mr. Purdue's life and work beyond casual street?talk that portrayed Purdue as a difficult individual with whom to work. This biography incorporates research efforts by previous writers with facts gleaned from newspaper coverage, official documents, and a few rare samples of Mr. Purdue's letters. In this way, a complete picture of the man and myth is generated.
With the intense economic development and accelerated modernization experienced by Spain since the 1970s, and especially following its entrance to the European Economic Community in 1986, the country has undergone a rapid inversion in migratory patterns. After being an exporter of economic migrants for almost a century, in the last 20 years Spain has seen itself on the receiving end of immigration. Coinciding with a time when Spain is highlighting its belonging to Europe, the growing presence of Moroccan immigrants in particular confronts Spanish society with the repressed non-European, African and Oriental aspects of its national identity.  The Return of the Moor examines the anxiety over symbolic and literal boundaries permeating the Spanish reception of these immigrants through an interdisciplinary analysis of social, fictional and performative texts. It argues that Moroccans constitute a “problem” to Spaniards not because of their cultural differences, as many claim, but because they are not different enough. Perceived as “Moors,” they conjure up past ghosts that continue to haunt the Spanish imaginary, revealing the acute tensions inherent to Spain's tenuous position between Europe and Africa.
The Three Person Solution resolves problems with human interaction by formalizing three person relationships. Two against one dynamics disappear. Double binds dissolve. A collaborative relational practice becomes possible for many people. Two person relationships benefit indirectly. Our tendency is to view any three person interaction in classic dramatic terms, but the structure of this relational practice, called Threeing, is not a narrative structure. The Three do not interact dramatically following a story line to an ending. Rather, the Three interact recursively, following a circuit that balances relationships. To partake in the process of Threeing, narrative expectations must be abandoned. The practice of Threeing can keep relationships healthy and thriving in family settings, intercultural situations, educational programs, collaborative research, collaborative art making, peace making, governance, management, online groups, worker training and environmental initiatives. This book includes an explanation of the theory of Threeing based on the cybernetics of Gregory Bateson and the philosophy of Charles Peirce, examples of Threeing in education and worker training, and detailed instructions for using the Three Person Solution.
Theory of Mind is what enables us to “put ourselves in another’s shoes.” It is mindreading, empathy, creative imagination of another’s perspective: in short, it is simultaneously a highly sophisticated ability and a very basic necessity for human communication. Theory of Mind is central to such commercial endeavors as market research and product development, but it is also just as important in maintaining human relations over a cup of coffee. Not surprisingly, it is a critical tool in reading and understanding literature, which abounds with characters, situations, and “other people’s shoes.” Furthermore, it is becoming increasingly apparent that reading literature also hones these critical mindreading skills. Theory of Mind and Literature is a collection of nineteen essays by prominent scholars (linguists, cognitive scientists, and philosophers) working in the cutting-edge field of cognitive literary studies, which explores how we use Theory of Mind in reading and understanding literature.   Table of Contents   1: Theory of Mind Now and Then: Evolutionary and Historical Perspectives Theory of Mind and Theory of Minds in Literature by Keith Oatley Social Minds in Little Dorrit by Alan PalmerThe Way We Imagine by Mark TurnerTheory of Mind and Fictions of Embodied Transparency by Lisa Zunshine 2: Mind Reading and Literary Characterization Theory of the Murderous Mind: Understanding the Emotional Intensity of  John Doyle’s Interpretation of Sondheim’s Sweeney Todd by Diana CalderazzoDistraction as Liveliness of Mind: A Cognitive Approach to Characterization in Jane Austen by Natalie PhillipsSancho Panza’s Theory of Mind by Howard MancingIs Perceval Autistic?: Theory of Mind in the Conte del Graal by Paula Leverage 3: Theory of Mind and Literary / Linguistic Structure Whose Mind’s Eye? Free Indirect Discourse and the Covert Narrator in Marlene Streeruwitz’s Nachwelt by Jennifer Marston WilliamAttractors, Trajectors, and Agents in Racine’s “Récit de Théramène” by Allen G. WoodThe Importance of Deixis and Attributive Style for the Study of  Theory of Mind: The Example of William Faulkner’s Disturbed Characters by Ineke Bockting 4: Alternate States of Mind Alternative Theory of Mind for Artificial Brains: A Logical Approach to Interpreting Alien Minds by Orley K. MarronReading Phantom Minds: Marie Darrieussecq’s Naissance des fantômes and Ghosts’ Body Language by Mikko KeskinenTheory of Mind and Metamorphoses in Dreams: Jekyll & Hyde, and The Metamorphosis by Richard Schweickert and Zhuangzhuang XiMother/Daughter Mind Reading and Ghostly Intervention in Toni Morrison’s Beloved by Klarina Priborkin 5: Theoretical, Philosophical, Political Approaches Changing Minds: Theory of Mind and Propaganda in Egon Erwin Kisch’s Asien gründlich verändert by Seth KnoxFunctional Brain Imaging and the Problem of Other Minds by Dan Lloyd, Vince Calhoun, Godfrey Pearlson, and Robert AsturHow is it Possible to Have Empathy? Four Models by Fritz BreithauptTheory of Mind and the Conscience in El casamiento engañoso by José Barroso Castro  
Concurrent with the dawn of multiparty politics in 1990, Mirko Pejanovic emerged in Bosnia-Herzegovina as the leader of the Socialist Alliance. His organization was in charge of implementing policies of the League of Communists.This memoir, beginning in 1990, tells the story of his experiences as a public and political leader. Through Bosnian Eyes covers a decade of Pejanovic's service. His role in public life was characterized by an unwavering commitment to national equality and strong convictions regarding the nature of a multiethnic Bosnia-Herzegovina. As a participant in the most important political events of the time, and as a colleague of every major political leader, the author conveys a personal history that is memorable for its insights into the neglected world of Serbs who remained loyal to the nation in trying times.
In the eighteenth century, a type of novel flourished showing naive outsiders who come to Europe and are amazed at what they see. Foreign travelers first set foot in Europe in the sixteenth century and are memorably present in Montaigne's essay Des Cannibales. The genre was made popular in France by Montesquieu's novel Lettres persanes. Considering the "stranger" as a figure of ambiguity, Sylvie Romanowski explains why the genre was so useful to the Enlightenment. The question of why showing ambiguous stranger is important in that period is addressed in the book's introduction by setting the Enlightenment in the historical context of the seventeenth century. Romanowski then examines Montaigne's Des Cannibales, showing how these first "outsiders" relate to their eighteenth-century successors. She next considers Montesquieu's Lettres persanes in its entirety, studying the voices of the men, the women, and the eunuchs. She also studies other examples of the genre. The author closes with a discussion of the philosophical tension, ongoing in Western thought, between skeptics and those who, refusing skepticism, seek firm foundations for knowledge, this draws connections between the sixteenth century, and our "postmodern" era.
Touched by the Dragon details wartime accounts of average servicemen and women-some heroic, some frightening, some amusing, some nearly unbelievable-extracted from interviews with Vietnam War veterans residing in Newport County, Rhode Island. The work is a historical compendium of fascinating and compelling stories woven together in a theme format. What makes this book truly unique, however, is its absence of literary pretentiousness. Relating oral accounts, the veterans speak in a no-nonsense, matter-of-fact way. As seen through the eyes of the veterans, the stories include first-person experiences of infantry soldiers, a flight officer, a medic, a nurse, a combat engineer, an intelligence soldier, and various support personnel. Personalities emerge gradually as the veterans discuss their pre war days, their training and preparation for Vietnam, and their actual in-country experiences. The stories speak of fear and survival: the paranoia of not knowing who or where the enemy was; the bullets, rockets, and mortars that could mangle a body or snuff out a life in a instant; and going home with a CMH--not the Congressional Medal of Honor, but a Casket with Metal Handles. The veterans also speak friendships and simple acts of kindness. But more importantly, they speak of healing-both physical and mental.
Michel Tournier, member of the Acadimie Goncourt and one of the most influential French writers of the post-Nouveau roman period, stresses the crucial interrelationship that exists between myth and literature. It is the writer's duty, he states, to keep myths alive by continually renewing and transforming them, re-releasing them in an ever changing social context. Written in French, this study considers the Tournier novel as the story of a voyage in a literal and figurative sense. Jonathan Krell uses the term "elementary" to characterize this voyage through the universe of Tournier's imagination, which is dominated by the four primordial element&--earth, water, air, and fire. Building on a foundation of Western culture's rudimentary myths, such as the ogre, twinship, and the Biblical stories of creation and the magi, Tournier performs a radical and disturbing transformation. Professor Krell shows how the transformation is made.
During the past twenty-five years, a tremendous boom has occurred in the publishing of biographies, especially literary biographies-that is, lives of creative writers. Yet, according to this critical study, literary biographers have most often focused their efforts merely upon presenting historical facts while being generally unaware of artistic possibilities in the subgenre. Criticism of biography frequently quotes Desmond MacCarthy's dictum that the biographer is "an artist who is on oath." Undoubtedly, every biographer must be "on oath" not to deny or change the "truth" of historical facts. But the literary biographer who aspires to be an "artist" must include in his or her biographical design aesthetic truth as well. And good biography, like good fiction, is shaped by that individual point of view which alone may make it art. Through an analysis of Steven Millhauser's satiric novel/biography, Edwin Mullhouse: The Life and Death of an American Writer, 1943-1954, Jeffrey Cartwright, Petrie outlines a technique fo judging specifically literary biographies as aesthetic objects-works revealing purpose, structure, and style. He then applies this technique in extensive discussions of three types of literary biography; illustrated here primarily by works about four modern American novelists; Joseph Blotner's Faulkner, Andrew Turnbull's Scott Fitzerald, W. A. Swanberg's Dreiser, and Leon Edel's Henry James.
Henry C. Wallace was secretary of agriculture, Henry A. Wallace was secretary of agriculture and vice-president to Franklin D. Roosevelt. But 'Uncle Henry' Wallace, perhaps the least known of the Henry Wallaces, was the patriarch of the Wallace family in Iowa and a pivotal figure in American agricultural history. In this documentary profile, Richard S. Kirkendall has compiled material from Uncle Henry's voluminous writings to create a vivid portrait of the man who had a hand in many of the key changes in farming from 1880 to 1920
In the most comprehensive biographical study of John Purdue (c. 1802-1876) to date, Purdue's great-great-grandniece describes her travels to the diverse places where Purdue had lived in order to learn about the mysterious relative known in her family as "Uncle". Using fresh, unpublished source materials-including Purdue's personal correspondence, business ledgers, and the family oral histories-the author examines Purdue's beginning among illiterate, immigrant, Pennsylvania mountain-hollow folks. Uncle challenges a commonly held belief that Purdue was a cold-hearted business mogul. Instead the author shows Purdue as a human being and as a generous family man with a visionary nature.
Elsa Morante has long been recognized internationally as one of the most significant and innovative writers of twentieth-century Italy; nonetheless, there has to date been no full-length study in English dedicated to her work. This collection of twelve essays offers the first comprehensive evaluation of Morante to appear outside Italy, while taking into account modern critical and theoretical developments.
Focusing on a diversely rich selection of writers, the pieces featured in Unfinalized Moments: Essays in the Development of Contemporary Jewish American Narrative explore the community of Jewish American writers who published their first book after the mid-1980s. It is the first book-length collection of essays on this subject matter with contributions from the leading scholars in the field. The manuscript does not attempt to foreground any one critical agenda, such as Holocaust writing, engagements with Zionism, feminist studies, postmodern influences, or multiculturalism. Instead, it celebrates the presence of a newly robust, diverse, and ever-evolving body of Jewish American fiction. This literature has taken a variety of forms with its negotiations of orthodoxy, its representations of a post-Holocaust world, its reassertion of folkloric tradition, its engagements with postmodernity, its reevaluations of Jewishness, and its alternative delineations of ethnic identity. Discussing the work of authors such as Allegra Goodman, Michael Chabon, Tova Mirvis, Rebecca Goldstein, Pearl Abraham, Jonathan Rosen, Nathan Englander, Melvin Jules Bukiet, Tova Reich, Sarah Schulman, Ruth Knafo Setton, Ben Katchor, and Jonathan Safran Foer, the fifteen contributors in this collection assert the ongoing vitality and ever-growing relevancy of Jewish American fiction.  
This authoritative study explores the scientific and mathematical cultural milieu that patterns much of the Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges's narrative design. Although criticism of Borges's fiction and essays has long emphasized philosophical traditions, Merrell expands the context of this interrogation of traditions by revealing how early twentieth-century and contemporary mathematics and physics also participated in a similar exploration