Global Languages and Literatures

Craig Smith has provided an introduction and edition of John Macksoud's Other Illusions. This posthumous work, completed in 1973, reinforces a strain of relativistic theory that retrieves the Sophists and extends through Jacques Derrida to the present where many of us deal with constructed realities in our rhetorical theories. Macksoud was also offering a warning about pseudo-scientific research, a Philipic against the quantitative approach to communication theory. He not only attempted to reveal the rhetorical nature of their use of the scientific method, he tried to show that science itself was at base rhetorical. In form, the short book threatened the established order of the academic community. The book uses anecdotes, sayings, stories, and even jokes to mark off sections and to initiate new lines of thought. These devices were deemed subversive rather than performative because they are rarely, if ever, used in academic prose and because the messages they carry undercut normal ways of thinking.
Just Love Me reveals the thoughts and emotions of a woman struggling with a suddenly unmanageable life; numerous hospitalizations, suicide attempts, everyday turmoil, and finally, the arduous search for an accurate diagnosis of the illness responsible for it all: Alzheimer's disease (AD).This account is unique in that most books on the subject of Alzheimer's are written by a carepartner or medical professional. There are very few books actually written by a person living with the disease, and Just Love Me should be required reading for anyone who has any contact with a person afflicted with AD. This book is especially helpful for anyone related by birth, marriage, friendship, or those people who have a professional relationship with Alzheimer's sufferers.Jeanne Lee's very personal, frank description of her life experiences before, approaching, and during the early stages of AD enables readers to better understand the disease from the inside out; a view not often seen by non-sufferers. By getting inside the mind of the author and experiencing with her the worries and frustrations that constantly torment her, the symptoms of AD become less enigmatic for the reader.
In this revisionist study of the poetics of tragedy during the French classical age, John Lyons challenges prevailing notions of a coherent, unified, and widely accepted "classical doctrine."
This study of the social content of the only surviving Spanish epic provides a means of assessing the motives and intentions of the protagonist and of other characters. Chapters are devoted to such themes as the multifarious significance of kinship and lineage, with special attention to the role of fathers, uncles, and cousins in the world of clan loyalties; amity as a system of fictive kinship, personal honor, and public organization; the importance of women, and the meaning and function of marriage, dowry, and related practices; the emergence of the polity as a rivalry of social, legal, and economic systems; and the implications, within an essentially kin-ordered world, of the poem's notions of shame, honor, status, and social inequality.
This text explores the literary, cultural and political relationships of Francisco de Quevedo (1580–1645), one of the major writers of the Spanish Golden Age. It establishes the birth and development of the first Spanish literary field circa 1600 then focuses on the relationship between the literary field and the field of power (the King, the court at large and the Catholic Church hierarchy).
The twelve poems in the title piece express a respect for traditions. Another four poems conjure up images of a brother killed in war. And six poems paint icons, some from real objects and others from moments in the mind. Several poems create experiences in very small places, such as Winnemucca, Nevada, and Horsefly, British Columbia. This poet sees poems in subjects others might easily miss.
Francisco de Quevedo, the Spanish poet and satirist whose books were by far the most widely read in Spain in the 17 th century, died unaware that his genius had created modern satire in Spanish, and that for the ensuing five centuries, as we now know, his name would be a household word wherever Spanish was spoken. Between 1605 and 1621, Quevedo wrote a sequence of five "Dreams" or "Visions" ( Suenos y discursos ), in each of which he hilariously envisions Spanish society as populated by people rightfully condemned to Hell. These astonishingly witty and irreverent satires of contemporary Spanish culture, morality, prejudice and religious fanaticism, were composed in a style so allusive, elliptical and equivocal as to successfully entertain both those who barely understood their full range and import, and others who celebrated the poet's rebellious insinuations. Censorship prohibited the publication of such satire in its original form, but hundreds of copies were made by hand and circulated widely. In 1993 a critical edition of all of the surviving manuscripts was published. Today the Suenos are commonly read in modern editions of the first censored version, printed in 1627. The present book ( La tradicion. . . ), compares this version with all of the 43 extant manuscripts, and for the first time identifies those groups of manuscripts from which the publishers of the first edition derived their text. This text can now be seen as a version not only censored, but corrupted successively by copyists and editors who did not understand Quevedo's satire, and did not hesitate to add entire clauses, omit others and transfer sentences from one place to another.
Rereading canonic Spanish texts from Renaissance humanism to modernist literature, Read deploys a theoretical basis of post-structuralist thinking to offer a critique of traditional Hispanism in the light of its assumption of a transcendental subject and its corresponding insistence on the autonomy of the literary text.
From September 1862 until May 1865, Major William Watson served as surgeon with the 105th Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers, which fought at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, and elsewhere. Over the course of three years at war, he wrote 91 letters to his family, in which he describes his own war against death and disease. This well-educated and sensitive young man has left us a variety of impressions of camp life, marches, and battles; of a soldier's matter-of-fact willingness to accept-though not without grumbling-the rigors of his lot, of concern with the job at hand and with immediate needs like food and shelter; and of a veteran's indifference to the flag-waving of professional patriots. In spite of his often acute criticisms of the Union's military leadership, Watson never faltered in his belief in the Union cause and the ultimate outcome of the war nor in his dedication to Lincoln's major goals
George Ade, one of the most beloved writers of his day, carried on a lively correspondence with the most colorful of great and near-great. George M. Cohan, William Howard Taft, Theodore Roosevelt, John T. McCutcheon, James Whitcomb Riley, Finley Peter Dunne, Hamlin Garland all received letters from the Hoosier humorist. Ade’s keen observation, compact and straight-forward style, and understated humor mark his correspondence as well as his immensely popular newspaper columns, books, and plays. As Paul Fatout writes in his foreword: “The charm of George Ade lies in his good-natured contemplation of our species, which delineates, not with malice or with condescension, but with the gusty enjoyment of a spectator entertained by a continuous variety show.” Ade traveled the world over many times, but always returned to the home he never really left—Indiana. His companions and correspondents included presidents, senators, Hollywood moguls, and Broadway stars, but his first allegiance was to the farmlands and small towns of mid-America. From Hazelden Farm, near Brook, he kept in close touch with politicians from the precincts to the governor’s mansion. He wrote to educators, editors, and executives, and took an active part in the life and growth of his alma mater, Purdue University. Characteristically, the man who succeeded as a writer by setting down familiar situations sent some of his most interesting letters to ordinary citizens all over the state. Ade’s friendships were so diversified that his correspondence forms a patchwork of popular history, literature, politics, and entertainment. His interchange of ideas about people and events shaping the twentieth century as well as his own life will provide insights for students of varied aspects of American culture. This volume presents 182 of the most interesting and informative letters from the thousands of extant pieces of his correspondence in scores of collections scattered throughout the United States. The letters are arranged chronologically annotated with explanatory material and with sources. A foreword, introduction and Ade’s biography are included. Photographs, sketches, handwriting samples, and other illustrations which evoke the man and his times are interspersed with the text.
Lincoln's Censor examines the effect of government suppression on the Democratic press in Indiana during the spring of 1863. Indiana's Democratic newspaper editors were subject to Milo S. Hascall's General Order Number Nine, which proclaimed that all newspaper editors and public speakers that encouraged resistance to the draft or any other war measure would be treated as traitors. Brigadier General Hascall, commander of the District of Indiana, was amplifying General Order Number Thirty-eight of Major General Ambrose Everts Burnside, the commander of the Department of the Ohio. Burnside's order declared that criticism of the president and the war effort was tantamount to "declaring sympathies with the enemy." Eleven Democratic newspapers in Indiana faced suspension.
The study of biography has leaped from surveys of biographical writing and statements of biographical, practice to semiotic and poststructaralist discussions of, the modality of biography without adequate consideration of what has already been done to the theory of biography. Professor Novarr has closed that gap with a comprehensive and judicious historical survey and assessment of a I the major (and many of the minor) statements made about biography in the crucial period 188D-1970. The Lines of Life describes the diversity and complexity of theories of biography in the thirty years prior to the publication of Eminent Victorians and makes clear the importance of the ideas of Lesile Stephen, Sidney Lee, Edmund Gosse, and William Roscoe Thayer. It provides for the exciting decade after Eminent Victorians, rigorous assessments of the work of Harold Nicolson, Andre Maurois, Virginia Woolf, and Hesketh Pearson. It shows how theorists and critics in the fifties hedged on the question of biography as art. It traces, in the work of writers like David Cecil, Leon Edel, Mark Schorer, Paul Murray Kendall, and others, the nature of the relation between biographer and subject, the concept that biography is essentially the interpretation of one mind by another, and the idea that the biographer's angle of vision is both inevitable and important
This book is a very nuanced, meticulously researched and vividly written study of a series of important debates in German literary circles since the fall of the Berlin Wall and the rapid political transformations that have accompanied German unification. Rosellini not only offers trenchant interpretations of major controversies of the last decade in Germany, but he also provides the necessary background information needed to make sense of these important public debates. An Open Access PDF version of this book has also been made available at the request of the author.
The series concentrates on the efforts of the girls and women who, like their male counterparts, have obtained wonderful results in the air.
Machado de Assis (1839-1908) is Brazil's greatest writer and the most important Latin American writer of the nineteenth century. His subtle criticism of cherished institutions is evident to all readers, and critics have often mentioned his skepticism. In Machado de Assis, the Brazilian Pyrrhonian, however, a philosopher seriously examines Machado's philosophical position for the first time. Jose' Raimundo Maia Neto traces Machado's particular brand of skepticism to that of the ancient philosopher Pyrrho of Elis and reveals the sources through which he inherited that line of thought. He then shows how Machado's own philosophical development follows the stages proposed by Pyrrho for the development of a skeptical worldview.
Where does the Twain meet? As observer and reporter. As teacher and preacher. With a twinkle in his eye. With whimsy in his heart. Twain indeed speaks volumes for himself through his newspaper stories, humorous columns, letters, speeches, and interviews, gathered together here for the first time in one paperback volume and providing a picture of the consummate writer, unabashed, critical, and cutting. A perfect title for every Twain collection
There is no question that the Passion is the most controversial Jesus-if not religious-movieever made. The articles...are an attempt by academics to explain why. Five essays were presentedin an earlier version at the Jewish Studies Symposium on key issues raised by The Passion of the Christ held at Purdue University on March 30, 2004 (Garber, Mork, Pawlikowski, Robertson, Young); and 15 essays (Bartchy, Edelheit, Edelman, Feldman, Golan, Greenberg, Haas, Holdredge, Jacobs, Libowitz, Moore, Neusner, Wheeler, Zuckerman) complement the Purdue Symposium. The contributors reflect on a plethora of issues, and they show that concerned andinformed Jews and Christians together can assess dis/misinformation, monitor dissent, alleviate community fears, and reassure that the solid rock of Jewish-Catholic-Protestant dialogue, though assailed, has not become chipped. The passion over the "Passion" has proven to be a blessing, not a curse. Indeed, seize the teaching moment and develop the agenda. The respect of two ancient faith-communities demands and deserves this.
Adler's intent here is not to read the American experience through its theatre, but to approach American drama through a considerable body of representative, and oftentimes critically acclaimed, popular plays. He analyzes each of these plays-including such classics as O'Neill's Long Day's Journey into Night, Wilder's Our Town, Miller's Death of a Salesman, and Williams's Streetcar Named Desire-in a brief interpretive essay, focusing on themes and theatrical techniques
Written with the general Americanist rather than the theoretical specialist in mind, Modern Lives traces the development of the idea of "the lost generation" and reinterprets it in light of more recent versions of the American ig2os. Employing a wide range of historical, literary, and cultural theory, Marc Dolan focuses on American versions of "the lost generation," particularly as they emerged in the autobiographical writings of the generation's supposed "members." By examining the narrative and discursive forms that Ernest Hemingway, Malcolm Cowley, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and others imposed on the raw data of their lives, Dolan draws out the subtle relationships between personal and historical narratives of the early twentieth century, as well as the ways in which the mediating notion of a distinct "generation" allowed those authors to pass back and forth between "the personal" and "the historical
The book is a collection of fourteen essays by Abel on Hawthorne's fiction. The essays were published over a span of about thirty-five years in various scholarly journals. The author has revised some of these essays considerably and has added seven chapters to give the book continuity and unity.
Murder HE Wrote is the autobiography of a successful writer who has written more than 90 books. Hopefully, Murder HE Wrote (the title refers to the series of more than 20 best-selling murder mystery novels he's written based upon the popular TV show, "Murder, She Wrote") will inspire, and prove useful to those aspiring to a successful writing career, a profession not known for its high success rates. But more than explaining his writing techniques, he stresses the attitudes necessary for success as a writer-or in any endeavor, for that matter.
E.M. Schorb's book of pathologies and cures, Murderer's Day, reflects life on the mosquito coasts, the plains and foothills of Parnassus. There is less magic down here than there is up there, and the poet seems certain, as all poets must be, for wonder is their way, that there is even more magic beyond. Schorb hopes that his little missal/missile shines with truth and reflects his faith that, although it is dark down here, we are all going into a world of light
He was twice the winner of the Pulitzer Prize in fiction: in 1919 for The Magnificent Ambersons and in 1922 for Alice Adams. His play Clarence launched Alfred Lunt on his distinguished career and provided Helen Hayes with an early successful role. His Penrod books continued the American boy-story tradition which started with the works of Mark Twain. Early in this century, through his novel The Turmoil, he warned of sacrificing the environment to industrial growth. Yet, since his death in 1946, Booth Tarkington–this writer from the Midwest who accomplished so much–has faded from the memory of the reading public, and many of his works are out of print. But his memory is fresh and vivid in the mind of his grandniece Susanah Mayberry, and her recollections of him leap from the pages of her book. She recalls that as a small child, before she was aware of her uncle’s fame as a writer, he emerged as the one figure whose outline was clear among the blur of forms that made up her large family. “No one who met Booth Tarkington ever forgot him,” says his great-niece. So, she introduces the reader to this multifaceted individual: the young man-about-town, the prankster, the writer of humorous letters (who drew caricatures in the margins), the bereaved father, the inspiration of the affection of three women (simultaneously), and the lover and collector of art objects and portraits. The author of this volume draws primarily upon her own personal experiences, family lore, and letters (some never published before) to portray her amiable uncle. She tells of the pleasure it gave him to entertain his young nephews and nieces at his Tudor-style winter home in Indianapolis – where they played a spirited form of charades. She recalls vacations which she, as a college student, spent at his light-filled summer home in Kennebunkport, Maine – where she met his famous neighbors. During all of those times, Uncle Booth was the keen observer of youth, who created Penrod and friends from his observations, and the teacher o f youth, who transmitted his own love of art to his young relations. While recapturing memories of the unforgettable Tarkington, Mayberry recreates an era of elegant and leisurely living, when on the dining table “in the fingerbowls . . . were nosegays of sweet peas and lemon verbena or geranium leaves.” Susanah Mayberry shares with the reader a treasure of family photographs including Tarkington at various ages; interiors and exteriors of his homes; her father and uncles as children (the models of Penrod); the writer’s indomitable sister who championed his early work; and his devoted second wife, a “gentle dragon,” who kept his day-to-day life running smoothly. Indiana residents will feel “at home” with the frequent references to the state and its people. Indianapolis of the late nineteenth through the mid-twentieth centuries influenced Tarkington and his work. The city was his birthplace and his death place. He spent a year at Purdue University where he met such “brilliancies” as George Ade and John McCutcheon. Other famous and not-so-famous Hoosiers became a part of Tarkington’s life, and they—along with international literary, theatrical, and political luminaries—reappear in Susanah Mayberry’s recollections of her amiable uncle.
Paul Harris Stores did exactly what it was supposed to. It brought fashion, comfort, style, and functionality to millions of women in the Midwest. Paul Harris' run of 50 years is remarkable because so few retail stores make it that long and so few make it so big. His life and experiences tell readers much about U.S. culture, retail history, and a brand of entrepreneurship that appears to be making a comeback.