Health & Human Sciences

This inquiry into matters of heart, conducted under the shadows of pending surgery, awakens themes of boyhood, education, and marriage and prompt questions about loyalty to a deceased father, connections with immigrant grandparents, loss and rediscovery of faith, and solitude versus community. A medical narrative, the book also chronicles a span of contemporary American life. Throughout Amato's account, the consistent reminder of his upcoming bypass invites readers to reflect on their own lives and selves. This is an intelligent and witty guide to an immensely common operation that nevertheless for each patient constitutes a unique experience-a veritable rite of passage.
Articles by an array of international experts provide as an excellent resource for professionals and students involved in the area of disability studies. The book is divided into three parts - (1) disability and modern society; (2) working with people who are challenged; and (3) working within a disability-services environment. This approach mirrors the contemporary debate within a practice framework reflecting how individuals, organizations, and communities deal with the problem and solutions.At the beginning of each chapter, learning objectives are set out to aid the reader in dealing with the text and activities contained inside the chapter. The materials across the chapters are developed so that when finished, the reader will become more skilled in the area of modern community disability services. This integrated approach provides the key elements needed for both training and advancing knowledge in this fast growing area.
A Complete Guide to Alzheimer's's--Proofing Your Home is a comprehensive practical guide for helping in-home caregivers and health professionals who advise them, to evaluate the home environment and make modifications enhancing safety and function. Easy to read, the book offers the reader numerous new ideas on every page, each with the potential solve some small yet vexing problem. The book begins with an overview of how to evaluate the rooms and exterior areas of a typical home and how to formulate a plan that facilitates maximum function for both the care-recipient and caregiver.A strength of the book is the second chapter. It provides a disease overview focusing on symptom presentation and how it affects day to day function. This is particularly helpful for the caregiver as it explains how a symptom/behavior is represented in their home. Quotes familiar to professionals working with families help caregivers to recognize how this relates to their own situation. These quotes help to give the book focus and direction, but more important, the quotes provide a very empathetic and "human" touch and make the book highly readable. I find this approach much more salient than "academic approaches" to the description of dementia.Another strength is the glossary of terms, which is comprehensive and simple to understand. It can help the caregiver speak with health care professionals or understand recommendations - a problem even when the professional speaks in the simplest possible terms. A last strength is the recommendation of products designed for people with AD or for other purposes, but work well for people with AD. The authors have included a shopping guide for convenience of the reader. While this will need to be updated every few years, it is an invaluable resource.A Complete Guide to Alzheimer's-Proofing Your Home is a well-written thoughtful collection of ideas for home-based caregivers. The one drawback to the book is that it reinforces how terribly complex caring for people with dementia can be. The comprehensive table of contents can help caregivers sort out what they need to examine for each problem. This is a new approach to AD care and should, in my opinion, be an invaluable addition to the "Alzheimer's professional's"
Both accessible and insightful, this collection of personal critical essays employs a formal study of literature as framework for the consideration of universal issues, including grief management, death, and acceptance of, and benefit from, traumatic change. These topics offer Brackett the opportunity to reflect upon the joys and rigors of scholarship as she considers professional issues, such as academic advancement through publication. They stand as testimony to one professional's belief that academia should not only embrace but encourage a number of approaches to self-expression on the part of its scholars. Her personal commentary draws from the work and life stories of many writers, including Elizabeth Cary, Anne Bradstreet, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Rabindranath Tagore, Leo Tolstoy, Katherine Anne Porter, and V.S. Naipaul. Critical and philosophical commentary by notables such as Richard Rorty, Michel Foucault, Jane Tompkins, Lois McNay, Diane P. Freeman, Olvia Frey, Frances Murphy Zauhar, Janice Radway and Patricia Waugh interlace and advance Brackett's own speculations. The book makes clear Brackett's belief that no reasonable explanation exists for the necessity some scholars see in withholding results of literary study from a broader audience, unless it be a reluctance to write with the clarity necessary to make digestible and enjoyable the fruits of their profession.
This volume illustrates the diversity of ongoing research in the field of veterinary behavioral medicine and includes the current findings of scientists, veterinarians and practitioners. The materials included provide new additions to the growing knowledge base, refine or confirm current opinions, provide avenues for further research, and increase the appreciation and understanding of the different approaches used internationally within the discipline.
James and Eileen Goggin describe the interaction between Jewish and Gentile analysts before and after the Third Reich, demonstrating how most of the Gentile analysts quickly adapted to the new regimens demands, while the Jews were forced to emigrate.
In her book Fantasies of Gender and the Witch in Feminist Theory and Literature, Justyna Sempruch analyses contemporary representations of the "witch" as a locus for the cultural negotiation of genders. Sempruch revisits some of the most prominent traits in past and current perceptions in feminist scholarship of exclusion and difference. She examines a selection of 20th century US-American, Canadian, and European narratives to reveal the continued political relevance of metaphors sustained in the archetype of the "witch" widely thought to belong to pop-cultural or folkloristic formulations of the past. Through a critical re-reading of the feminist texts engaging with these metaphors, Sempruch develops a new concept of the witch, one that challenges traditional gender-biased theories linking it either to a malevolent "hag" on the margins of culture or to unrestrained "feminine" sexual desire. Sempruch turns, instead, to the causes for radical feminist critique of "feminine" sexuality as a fabrication of logocentric thinking and shows that the problematic conversion of the "hag" into a "superwoman" can be interpreted today as a therapeutic performance translating fixed identity into a site of continuous negotiation of the subject in process. Tracing the development of feminist constructs of the witch from 1970s radical texts to the present, Sempruch explores the early psychoanalytical writings of Cixous, Kristeva, and Irigaray and feminist reformulations of identity by Butler and Braidotti together with fictional texts from different political and cultural contexts.
Anne Bashkiroff was a pioneer in the fight for Alzheimer’s awareness. Her dear husband, Sasha, suffered for nine years with this terrible brain- and soul-damaging illness. Anne was faced with unanswered questions, economic heartaches, and lonely nights of suffering. The consequences of Alzheimer's and the extended burden the disease places on families and caregivers was not fully known in the 1970s. Instead of giving up, Bashkiroff moved to make the world aware of the silent disease. Her strength and dedication led her to help establish the Family Survival Project. In 1997, she testified before First Lady Rosalynn Carter about the needs of caregivers. Bashkiroff turned her inward suffering to outward hope.
In The Golden Bridge, Patty Dobbs Gross provides both personal and professional advice on how specially bred and trained dogs help to facilitate communication for children with autism and other developmental disabilities. This important information compendium is a guide for parents dealing with the social, emotional, and educational issues of raising children with challenges. Myths and labels concerning autism are explored, examined, and redefined. While focused on children, the advice that Gross shares will be immensely helpful for anyone involved in breeding, raising, and training dogs to mitigate any type of disability at any age.The Golden Bridge provides advice about living with autism, animal-assisted therapy and autism, training an assistance dog to work with a child with autism or a developmental disability, and using an assistance dog to deal with a child's grief. This impressive volume also contains a vast list of resources, including web sites, for follow-up information, a section on books about autism, and a directory of assistance dog providers.
Illness in the Academy investigates the deep-seated, widespread belief among academics and medical professionals that lived experiences outside the workplace should not be sacrificed to the ideal of objectivity those academic and medical professions so highly value. The 47 selections in this collection illuminate how academics bring their intellectual and creative tools, skills, and perspectives to bear on experiences of illness. The selections cross genres as well as bridge disciplines and cultures.
Each year there are an estimated 125,000 people with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia who leave the safety of their homes and families, unable to find their way back. Because families may find it difficult to believe anything so terrible could happen to them, they often do not prepare for it. Wandering is the skeleton in the Alzheimer's closet, the lurking danger and topic that is never discussed- until it is too late. In workbook form, In Search of the Alzheimer's Wanderer outlines steps that families can take to find their loved ones if they are one day discovered missing. This book is an invaluable tool providing answers that could save lives
  Mention the words “Seeing Eye,” and most people will associate them with guide dogs for the blind and partially-sighted. Mention the name “Dorothy Harrison Eustis,” and most people will not recognize it, even though she is the woman responsible for founding The Seeing Eye, the first guide dog school in the United States.   Since its inception eighty years ago, The Seeing Eye has trained thousands of people who are visually impaired to use guide dogs. The success of the program has spawned guide dog schools across the country and around the world, and the concept has been further expanded to include service dogs for people with other kinds of disabilities.   Drawing on correspondence, private papers, and newspaper accounts of the day, Miriam Ascarelli chronicles the life of Dorothy Harrison Eustis from her upper class childhood in Victorian Philadelphia to her years as a young mother in the upstate New York boomtown of Hoosick Falls, her widowhood, her failed second marriage to a man thirteen years her junior, and the confluence of events that led to her launching The Seeing Eye. In doing so, Ascarelli reveals both a driven woman and a very private person who shunned media coverage of herself but actively courted it for her organization.  
Just Love Me reveals the thoughts and emotions of a woman struggling with a suddenly unmanageable life; numerous hospitalizations, suicide attempts, everyday turmoil, and finally, the arduous search for an accurate diagnosis of the illness responsible for it all: Alzheimer's disease (AD).This account is unique in that most books on the subject of Alzheimer's are written by a carepartner or medical professional. There are very few books actually written by a person living with the disease, and Just Love Me should be required reading for anyone who has any contact with a person afflicted with AD. This book is especially helpful for anyone related by birth, marriage, friendship, or those people who have a professional relationship with Alzheimer's sufferers.Jeanne Lee's very personal, frank description of her life experiences before, approaching, and during the early stages of AD enables readers to better understand the disease from the inside out; a view not often seen by non-sufferers. By getting inside the mind of the author and experiencing with her the worries and frustrations that constantly torment her, the symptoms of AD become less enigmatic for the reader.
D'Ausilio provides a variety of unique, pithy,and just plain outrageous bits of out-of-theordinaryobservation. Coupled with intriguingand expansive photographs, Lay Your Cardson the Table will give you the hand to deal
Michael Hyde's Life-Giving Gift of Acknowledgment is a brilliant and courageous work. It is brilliant in taking up an essential gesture of humanity-acknowledgment-and elaborating it by recourse to films, novels, poetry, philosophy, religion, science, and social controversy. In spite of this breathtaking reach, Hyde never loses sight of his purpose, to understand and affirm the moral-ontological-rhetorical gift of acknowledging another. The book is courageous because it dares place rhetoric and science into productive conversation and remains open to both. It is courageous because it takes up such emotionally difficult issues as the symbolism of the Confederate flag, what it meant to be heroic after September 11, 2001, and the ethical character of life in a world of computer technology. Hyde has done here what he does best-offer a philosophical-rhetorical investigation of a principle even as he enacts the moral dimension of the principle in telling his story. This is a profound, revealing, and indeed inspirational, work.
Dogs know when we are feeling down. They love it when we are happy and seeking friendship and fun, and they understand when we are feeling sad and desperate. This book presents a series of real-life tales of the positive effects dogs have had on people at the end of their lives, chronicling the visits by two therapy dogs, Woody and Katie, to patients in a south Florida hospice facility. Through twenty-one stories, infused with humor amidst the sadness, Michelle Rivera, an experienced animal therapist, explores the many ways in which animals can ease human suffering. Her book begins with the deeply personal story of her own mother Katherine’s illness and dying appeal to have the company of a dog, and proceeds to tell the stories of patients young and old who the author was inspired to visit with her “hospice hounds.” As well as demonstrating many of the techniques of animal therapy, Rivera argues powerfully that not allowing pets in health care facilities is a counterproductive policy that deprives patients of comfort at the time they need it most. Some of the stories were previously published in Hospice Hounds (2001), but the author has substantially expanded her introduction and added an invaluable final section that gives practical tips on training and certifying your dog to be a therapy animal.
Business and industry leaders are eager to find ways to spark the creative instinct in their work forces. This newly translated work examines the multi-layered environment of innovation by melding the thoughts of business management pundits like Peter Senge with the views of artist, politicians, and other non-traditional thinkers like Tao Ho, Peter Greenaway, and Wolfgang Rihm.
The Psyche of Feminism argues that a feminist ethics, in order to be both feminist and ethical, needs to embrace psychoanalysis. After reviewing the relation between feminism and psychoanalysis and arguing for the centrality of psychoanalysis to feminist thought, the study offers an analysis of two attempts by George Sand to reimagine the sexual relationship (Letters to Marcie, Lelia), where the emphasis is on political injustice and the impossibility of women's desires. Moving from rights and desires to the question of pleasures, Peebles then takes up a relatively little-read work by Colette, The Pure and the Impure, in which the narrator suggests that pleasure and its corporeal language hold the key to any understanding of masculinity and femininity. We are then led to the risky question of ""neutrality"" put forward by Nathalie Sarraute ( You Don't Love Yourself ), whose work forces a psychoana­lytic feminism to face the question: what if sexual difference itself is a ruse? Does the notion of a human neutrality condemn us either to a bygone humanism or to psycho­sis? The final chapter of the work synthesizes these analyses, and argues for a fundamental feminist rethinking of the ideal of equality, an ideal that figures significantly—and uneasily—in each of the works this book treats.
Serious illness and mortality, those most universal, unavoidable, and frightening of human experiences, are the focus of this pioneering study, which has been hailed as a telling and provocative commentary on our times. As modern medicine has become more scientific and dispassionate, a new literary genre as emerged: pathography, the personal narrative concerning illness, treatment and sometimes death. Hawkins's sensitive reading of numerous pathographies highlights the assumptions, attitudes, and myths that people bring to the medical encounter. One factor emerges again and again in these "case studies": the tendency in contemporary medical practice to focus primarily not on the needs of the individual who is sick but on the condition that we call disease. Recommended for medical practitioners, the clergy, caregivers, students of popular culture, and the general reader, Reconstructing Illness demonstrates that "only when we hear both the doctor's and the patient's voice will we have a medicine that is truly human."
Serious illness and mortality, those most universal, unavoidable, and frightening of human experiences, are the focus of this pioneering study, which has been hailed as a telling and provocative commentary on our times. As modern medicine has become more scientific and dispassionate, a new literary genre as emerged: pathography, the personal narrative concerning illness, treatment and sometimes death. Hawkins's sensitive reading of numerous pathographies highlights the assumptions, attitudes, and myths that people bring to the medical encounter. One factor emerges again and again in these "case studies": the tendency in contemporary medical practice to focus primarily not on the needs of the individual who is sick but on the condition that we call disease. Recommended for medical practitioners, the clergy, caregivers, students of popular culture, and the general reader, Reconstructing Illness demonstrates that "only when we hear both the doctor's and the patient's voice will we have a medicine that is truly human."
Whether you're hiking with your canine friend in a remote area or work with a dog on a search-and-rescue team or police force, you need to be prepared for emergencies when veterinary service is not available. Rescuing Rover: A First Aid and Disaster Guide for Dog Owners provides dog owners, handlers, and emergency physicians with an understandable guide for safe treatment until the dog can be transported to a veterinarian. Although a number of books describe some techniques for the emergency care of dogs, there is no single illustrated summary that is as practical. With its concise, easy-to-read instructions, detailed and beautifully rendered illustrations, and convenient format, this book covers such common medical procedures as bandaging an ear and constructing a makeshift muzzle. Written in consultation with canine handlers from FEMA, staff from the AAVDM and the Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine, it can also be used as a practical learning guide for veterinary medical and technical students.
Ellison put her career in research biochemistry on hold in order to raise two daughters. After 10 years, she wanted to work again but was too out of touch with technology and too attached to her rural home to go back to biochemistry. What to do? She turned her hobby of spinning into a business: sheepherding. These are her memories, advice, and lessons learned from the first seven years of the business, and they're delightful. Ellison's chapters flow sensitively--sometimes exuding a mother's common sense, sometimes McMurtryesque pathos, sometimes gently pointed Bombeckish humor. Undoubtedly this is a great acquisition for rural area libraries, but it's more than a farmer's account. This is inspiration for all women who may be contemplating joining the workforce yet feel unprepared or unsure that what they are interested in could become a fulfilling business.
In a critical dialogue with the metaphysical tradition from Plato to Hegel to contemporary schools of thought, the author convincingly argues that traditional rationalist metaphysics has failed to accomplish its goal of demonstrating the existence of a divine cause and moral purpose of the world. To replace the defective rationalist metaphysics, the author builds a new metaphysics on the idea that moods and affects make manifest the world's felt meanings; he argues that each feature of the world is a felt meaning in the sense that each feature is a source of a feeling-response if and when it appears. The author asserts that we must synthesize our two ways of knowing-poetic evocations and exact analyses-in order to decide which mood or affect is the appropriate appreciation of any given feature of the world. Smith gives evocative and exact explications of such features as the world's temporality, appearance, and mind-independency, as these features appear in the appropriate recitations.
Obesity is at epidemic levels worldwide. In the U.S. alone, it is estimated that by 2018 the cost of treating weight-related illnesses will double to almost $350 billion a year.  A 2010 report by the U.S. Surgeon General estimates that two-thirds of American adults and almost one in three children are now overweight or obese. Similar statistics emphasize the staggering problem in other industrialized countries. This volume originated in a special 2009 symposium funded in part by a grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Development (NICHD) and sponsorship from Mars-Waltham© on how human-animal interaction may help fight obesity across the lifespan. It provides systematic presentation of the scientific evidence for this powerful expression of the benefits of the human-animal bond. The volume will be especially valuable as a sourcebook of evidence-based studies for public health professionals treating overweight humans and veterinarians treating obese dogs.
Animal abuse as a predictor of abuse against humans has been documented extensively. Society TMs ever-rising violence has prompted experts to ask what alternatives are available to identify the early signs and stop the cycle. The International Handbook of Animal Abuse and Cruelty: Theory, Research, and Application is the authoritative, up-to-date compendium covering the historical, legal, research, and applied issues related to animal abuse and cruelty from scholars worldwide.