History

This study focuses on the transformation of the U.S. agricultural economy in the middle of the nineteenth center and its impact on farm famalies. In the first detailed case study of th etransition of subsistence to commercial agriculture, te author examines call formation, migration, and household structure in the context of emerging agricultural markets and the growing availability of cheap consumer goods.
The Second World War in Europe has generated more literature than perhaps any other event in modern history. Albania at War reviews the most important developments in Albania from the Italian invasion of the country in 1939 to the accession to power of the Albanian Communist Party and the establishment of a "people's democracy" in 1946. Fischer analyzes in great detail Italian goals and objectives in Albania and explains the eventual failure of Rome's policy, the subsequent German invasion of the country, and the rise of organized resistance movements against the Axis Powers.This unique pathbreaking book provides a vigorous and thought-provoking analysis of competing external interests in Albania and explores the great obstacles that the Albanians faced in regaining their independence at the end of the war. Albania at War, 1939-1945 thoroughly covers the developments in Albania during that turbulent period. It is essential reading for all students of Albanian history.
The Ambivalence of Identity examines nation-building in Austria and uses the Austrian experience to explore the conceptual foundations of nationhood
In 1955, Hugh Willoughby left for a Midwestern American university (Purdue University). He jotted down notes of his impressions and experiences to send back to his English friends, which were subsequently put together in a series of letters. These letters are uninhibited and never whittled down to spare American sensitivity. This newer annotated edition gives descriptions of events and practices that might have slipped out of modern recollection and provides a look at the American way of life and education that still insightful.
Aristocratic Redoubt: The Austro-Hungarian Foreign Office on the Eve of the First World War is a study of the nobility who served in the foreign office prior to World War I. Following the lead of historians who are reexamining pre-industrial elites in England and Germany, Godsey deals with such facets of aristocratic life as education, wealth, religion, and ethnicity. He contends that although the pre-war aristocracy has been stereotyped as frivolous and decadent, the Austro-Hungarian nobility, and thus the monarchy, in fact had great staying power. This work is a social history of the bureaucracy of the Ballhausplatz primarily in the decade leading up to 1914, though it provides a thorough overview of the service during the entire Dualist period
Rothenberg's work in the first analytical, full, length study of the army of Francis Joseph throughout its history from 1815-1918.
Rojas's Celestina (1499) is perhaps the second greatest work of Spanish literature, right after Don Quixote, and Delicado sought to surpass it with La Lozana andaluza (1530), an important precedent of the picaresque novel.Both works were written during the height of the Inquisition, when the only relatively safe way for New Christian writers of Jewish extraction like Rojas and Delicado to express what they felt about the discrimination they suffered and their doubts regarding the faith that had been forced upon their ancestors was in a covert, indirect manner. Some scholars have detected this subversive element in Rojas' and Delicado's corrosive view of the Christian societies in which they lived, but this book goes far beyond such impressionism, showing through abundant textual evidence that these two authors used superficial bawdiness and claims regarding the morality of their respective works as cover to encode attacks against the central dogmas of Christianity: the Annunciation, the Virgin Birth, the Incarnation, and the Holy Trinity.This book, which will generate controversy among Hispanists, many of whom have refused to examine these works for non-Catholic views, will be of interest not only to students and scholars of Spanish literature, but also to those involved in Jewish studies, Medieval European history, and cultural studies.
Balkan Anschluss tackles the thorny issue of the disappearance of Montenegro as a sovereign state in the course of and as a result of the First World War, a problem with clear contemporary relevance. In particular, Pavlovic investigates the ambiguous and often troubled relationship between two "Serb states," Montenegro and Serbia. The ultimate conclusion this book makes is that Montenegro was not so much "liberated" as it was "annexed" by Serbia at the end of World War I and that the people of Montenegro were denied an opportunity to exercise self-determination according to internationally recognized norms.
Authoritarian leaders such as Enver Hoxha, Todor Zhivkov, Josip Broz Tito and Slobodan Milosevic are part of a time-honored tradition of Balkan authoritarian rule that saw the domination of some of the most colorful but also brutal leaders of twentieth century. Among the latter were the wartime Croatian fascist Ante Pavlevic and Nicolae Ceausescu. Royal absolutists from the interwar period - Zog of Albania, Alexander of Yugoslavia and Carol II of Romania - and the Greek military dictators General Metaxas (1930s) and Colonel Papadopoulos (1967-74) are included. Kemal Ataturk's career is seen to have many links with the Balkans. This book brings the 'strongmen' to life, providing insights into their personalities and the forces that brought them to prominence. An enduring question is: has the age of the Balkan 'strongmen' truly ended?
The story told here of is one of adaptation and determination as the petty noble. Lacger family of Castres in southwestern France evolved -- and sometimes advanced their position--through the tr6ubled times of the Reformation and Wars of Religion, an all too brief period of tolerance, and the later proscription, of Protestantism. In the early 15oos, the family emerged from obscurity, some later attained influential posts and amassed considerable fortunes. While some family members embraced Catholicism for professional gain, family concerns were stiff important, as many then bequeathed their fortunes to Protestant family members.
Well, let's face it. There's no question in my mind that some of the people over there [U.S. State Department]—whose names are in my book—were actually just plain anti-Semitic. It's just that simple. There's no question according to the transcript of Josiah E. DuBois, Jr., during a tape-recorded interview conducted for the Harry S. Truman Library, 1973. Blowing the Whistle on Genocide tells the story of Josiah E. DuBois, Jr., a young treasury department lawyer who risked his career to alert the world to the Holocaust. As Nazism rose in Germany, many countries refused to allow Jewish immigration. The United States, spurred on by the America First Committee, wanted to remain neutral during the early days of World War II. Anti-Semitic influences kept the United States from filling its quotas for refugees, supposedly to keep Nazi spies out of the country. DuBois exposed the inequities in America's refugee policy and forced the United States government to take action to rescue the displaced Jews. Josiah E. DuBois, Jr., was a different kind of hero of the Holocaust. He was not a rescuer, and he did not shelter refugees. He was a whistle-blower and opened the eyes of the global community to Nazi atrocities.
This wide-ranging study offers a unique perspective to examine the conditions, constraints, and concerns of city government during the first half of the nineteenth century. Decisions concerning wastewater disposal in New York City reflect nineteenth-century notions of disease, the environment, and city responsibility. The decision to construct a comprehensive sewer system was a complex one that pitted individual liberty against the common. good and political considerations against those of professional physicians and engineers. This history of policy formation is, then, a story of changing values and ideas that must be understood within the context of the social, economic, political, and intellectual milieu of the middle of the nineteenth century.
When the Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine was founded fifty years ago, it would have been hard for the instructors and administrators who taught in makeshift classrooms and laboratories to imagine all of the accomplishments that would be born from their pioneering spirit. Learn when: the first women graduated from the school; the Veterinary Technology Program was established; the Purdue Comparative Oncology Program was founded by the Veterinary Medicine faculty; the School offered DVM students choices for specialization, including small animal, large animal, and equine medicine. This book gives an insider's view into the birth and growth of the Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine. From those early days-when veterinary care was primarily for draft and coach horses- to today's comparative medicine programs that benefit both humans and animals. This book details how the school has continuously provided excellent education and care.
Charlie and the Shawneetown Dame is a dramatization of a true story from the Prohibition era, involving one of the more bizarre gang wars in the annals of American crime lore, replete with homemade tank battles, crude bombings from an open cockpit aircraft, and chronicling the life of Charlie Birger, a flamboyant, slightly mad Al Capone wannabe. And then there's the dame, a beautiful young blonde society babe, whose sexual double-dealing entices then infuriates both rival's renegade leaders. A rapid, riveting read, Bain himself considers this his best book.
Spielman presents the role of the Habsburg court in the rise of Vienna the early modem period. His study clearly shows the extraordinarily complex web of interrelationships and interdependencies between the court, its servants, and the city as each strove to protect its privileges. The author's innovative approach consists in identifying the specific role that the court quartering system played in the expansion of the government's involvement in the development of the city. in so doing, Spielman ties in the two approaches traditionally used in histories of early modem Germany and Austria: the growth of the modem bureaucracy and the development of the Baroque.
The idea of complementing borders is appropriately ambiguous with respect to Latin America. People inhabiting cultural borders do not belong to either of the two sides. Yet they are contained within the complementation that emerges when two or more cultures interdependently and incongruously interact.In giving an account of complementing borders, this volume alludes to the Latin American context, most particularly Brazil and Mexico, through notions of rhythms and resonances, euphonies an discords, continuous flows and syncopes, all of which are found in everyday life, the arts, politics, economics, and social institutions and practices. The general theme, emerging from Charles S. Peirce's process philosophy, is that of ebb and flow, fusion and diffusion, ordering and disordering, and the intermixing and dispersal, of propensities and proclivities among Latin American cultures, past and present.The story begins with a dialogue in the form of a satirical play on various Jorge Luis Borges characters. Latin America is then presented in terms of invention and perpetual re-invention. As such, Latin America as sympathetic vibrations creating cultural patterning brings about notions of vagueness within generality, by way of homogenizing and heterogenizing tendencies within hegemonizing pressures. The reader comes away with a renewed sense of Latin American border complementing.
This is the story of a remarkable life and a journey, from the privileged world of Prussian aristocracy, through the horrors of World War II, to high society in the television age of postwar America. It is also an account of a spiritual voyage, from a conventional Christian upbringing, through marriage to Pastor Martin Niemoeller, to conversion to Judaism.Born during the turbulent days of the Weimar Republic, the author was the goddaughter of Kaiser Wilhelm II (to whom her father was financial advisor). During her teenage years, she witnessed the rise of the Third Reich and her family’s resistance to it, culminating in their involvement in “Operation Valkyrie,” the ill-fated attempt to assassinate Hitler and form a new government. At war’s end, she worked with British Intelligence to uncover Nazis leaders. Keeping a promise to her father, she left Germany for a new life in the United States in the 1950s, working for NBC and raising her son in the exciting world of New York, only to return to Germany as the wife of Martin Niemoeller, the voice of religious resistance during the Third Reich and of German guilt and conscience in the postwar decades. Upon her husband's death in 1984 she returned to America, after having converted to Judaism in London, and turned yet another page by becoming an active public speaker and author. The title reflects a story of three parts: “Crowns,” the world of nobility in which the author was raised; “Crosses,” her life with Martin Niemoeller and his battles with the Third Reich; and “Stars,” the spiritual journey that brought her to Judaism.
James and Eileen Goggin describe the interaction between Jewish and Gentile analysts before and after the Third Reich, demonstrating how most of the Gentile analysts quickly adapted to the new regimens demands, while the Jews were forced to emigrate.
Whether or not Haider has followed the ideological path of his compatriot Adolf Hitler, says Austrian political historian Höbelt, he has certainly followed his route to publicity around the world. He explores the politics of modern Austria, and debunks the myth that Haider is driven by passion rather than self-interest.
In the early 1900s, Mary Matthews and Lella Gaddis forged trails for women at Purdue University and throughout Indiana. Mary was the first dean of the School of Home Economics. Lella was Indiana’s first state leader of Home Demonstration. In 1914, Mary hired Lella to organize Purdue’s new Home Economics Extension Service. According to those who knew them, Lella was a “sparkler” who traveled the state instructing rural women about nutrition, hygiene, safe water, childcare, and more. “Reserved” Mary established Purdue’s School of Home Economics, created Indiana’s first nursery school, and authored a popular textbook. Both women used their natural talents and connections to achieve their goals in spite of a male-dominated society. As a land grant institution, Purdue University has always been very connected to the American countryside. Based on extensive oral history and archival research, this book sheds new light on the important role female staff and faculty played in improving the quality of life for rural women during the first half of the twentieth century. It is also a fascinating story, engagingly told, of two very different personalities united in a common goal.
This book provides a detailed analysis of U.S. economic transformation in the last 50 years, including the principal drivers for economic growth, U.S. demographic transformation, and the changing sector structure of the U.S. economy. Economic Transformation of the United States, 1950-2000 , provides contemporary and histori-cal contexts to illustrate how technological innovation and the changing American ideology play a role in the process of U.S. economic transformation. It describes the services sector in which one set of service industries is indentified as "wealth providers" and another set as "job providers."
This study, the first English-language book on advanced education in the Austrian lands during the nineteenth century, is recommended for scholars and students in the history of education, modern social history, and the history of the Habsburg Monarchy.
Egon Erwin Kisch (1885-1948) is widely regarded as one of the most outstanding journalists of the twentieth century. He is also credited with virtually defining reportage as a form of literary art in which accuracy of observation and fidelity to facts combine with creative narrative. Restless, doggedly inquisitive, fascinated with the unusual, deeply committed to decency and justice in human affairs, Kisch pursued a life of worldwide adventure and reporting. He visited North Africa, the Soviet Union, Central Asia, Australia, China, and the United States, where he traveled from one coast to the other as an ordinary seaman, made friends with Charlie Chaplin and Upton Sinclair, and commented with wit and irony on American life.
The book is organized around three dual political biographies: author and dramatist Hugo von Hofmannsthal is compared and contrasted to the parallel development of Leopold von Andrian; Karl Renner's political theories are examined in their temporal context and juxtaposed to the historical scholarship and political career of Josef Redlich; and the historical works of Heinrich Friedjung and the bureaucratic career of Ernest von Koerber are analyzed as parallel and partly complementing preoccupations with the crisis of the Austrian state around 1900. Each of the dual biographies focuses on a distinct problem in the development of the Imperial Austrian state in the early twentieth century.
Harry Spring kept detailed diaries throughout most of his life. Harry died in 1974, but through his diaries he lives to tell us about his experiences. His diary for the time from November 28, 1917 to August 19, 1918 were lost during the fighting in the Argonne Forest, but in 1974, just before he died, he wrote some supplementary notes of what he could remember of the time. Harry Spring never intended or expected that his diaries would be published. They are therefore as private and personal as they are detailed and accurate. He never tried to make his diaries politically correct – he wrote exactly what he felt. This is why these diaries are so powerful.