History

Writing about the theater, the cabaret, fellow artists and feuds, politics and war, the eight artists assembled here represent the finest of the "small form," the sketches and essays fostered in the atmosphere of the Vienna coffeehouse to capture the fleeting impressions of a rapidly changing world. Above all, they are concerned with their world, Austria and particularly Vienna
This collection of speeches delivered in 1987 presents the widely diverging opinions of four men: an eminent politician, a professional soldier, a government consultant, and a distinguished scholar. The first contributor, Senator George S. McGovern, ran as the Democratic candidate for president in 1972 on a platform that called for the withdrawal of American troops from Vietnam. The second speaker, General William C. Westmoreland, commanded American military forces in Vietnam until growing battlefield casualties and economic costs undermined support for the strategy of attrition in the United States. The third essay is by Edward N. Luttwak, a strong advocate for military reform in the United States and a frequent participant in high-level government discussions about American strategic interests throughout the world. The fourth speaker Thomas J. McCormack, is a diplomatic historian at the University of Wisconsin and an astute critic of American foreign policy. Each lecture is followed by a lively question-and-answer session that highlights the key points of agreement and disagreement with respect to the fundamental issues raised in the lectures. In a stimulating foreword, Akira Iriye challenges readers to think about the Vietnam War in relationship to the current debate about the role that the United States should play in world affairs.
In Virginia's Native Son, the election of L. Douglas Wilder in Virginia represents the first and only time an African-American has been elected Governor in the United States history. The book hits on five main points of his election and administration (an analysis of the campaign victory, the media's response to the campaign, the racism involved with the election and administration, the administration itself, and the legacy of the administration
Westward We Came is a memoir of Harold B. Kildahl, Sr. and his family pulling up roots in Norway and immigrating to the United States in 1866. It is a vivid description of their travels and settlement in southern Minnesota. Westward We Came is an authentic depiction of difficult pioneer life-true Americana, including the hardships as well as the joys of that time and place.
All paid jobs absorb and degrade the mind. - AristotleOnly by strict specialization can the scientific worker become fully conscious. -- Max WeberNo race can prosper till it learns that there is as much dignity in tilling a field as in writing a poem. - Booker T. WashingtonThe group must always dictate the modes of activity for the individual. -- Mary Parker FollettWhy Work: The Perceptions of "A Real Job" and the Rhetoric of Work through the Ages explores the contemporary cultural construction of work, beginning with the expression, "A Real Job." Over time, the concept of "work" was thought to be inherently understood by those who examined societal structures and human interactions. Today, the concept is more transient, and past definitions can be regarded as lacking because the concept of "work" arose from the particulars of an environment. This volume examines "work" in the writings of Aristotle, Plato, Confucius, St. Benedict, Adam Smith, Karl Marx, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Du Bois, Mother Jones, Emma Goldman, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, Frederick Winslow Taylor, and Mary Parker Follett to answer the question, "Can the concept of work be divorced from the thinker's past?" A final chapter re-examines the core issue in light of the varying concept of "work" and ask one more time "why work?" This work is a result of an Honors seminar at Purdue University.
As professor of farm finance and Governor of the Farm Credit Administration, William I. Myers promoted scientific farm management and co-operative marketing. This text provides a biography of a pioneer who played a role in transforming farming from a way of life into a science and business
Words at War: The Civil War and American Journalism analyzes the various ways in which the nation's newspaper editors, reporters, and war correspondents covered the biggest story of their lives-the Civil War-and in doing so both reflected and shaped the responses of their readers. The four sections of the book, Fighting Words, Confederates and Copperheads, The Union Forever, and Continuing Conflict trace the evolving role of the press in the antebellum, wartime, and postwar periods.
Spain’s Golden Age represents a transition from a largely oral tradition to a world in which information and culture were transmitted by way of written or printed documents. Contemporary theory has done much to elucidate the cultural and aesthetic implications of this transition. Utilizing concepts derived from such theorists as Derrida, Ong, and Austin, this study examines how writing and inscription are foregrounded and problematized in five Golden Age dramas: El villano en su rincón, by Lope de Vega; La estrella de Sevilla, of disputed authorship; El ejemplo mayor de la desdicha, by Mira de Amescua; Cautela contra cautela, by Tirso de Molina; and La cisma de Inglaterra, by Calderón de la Barca.
In the late 1970s, Brazil was experiencing the return to democracy through a gradual political opening and the re-birth of its civil society. Writing Identity examines the intricate connections between artistic production and political action. It centers on the politics of the black movement and the literary production of a Sao Paulo-based group of Afro-Brazilian writers, the Quilombhoje. Using Pierre Bourdieu's theory of the field of cultural production, the manuscript explores the relationship between black writers and the Brazilian dominant canon, studying the reception and criticism of contemporary Afro-Brazilian literature. After the 1940s, the Brazilian literary field underwent several transformations. Literary criticism's displacement from the newspapers to the universities placed a growing emphasis on aesthetics and style. Academic critics denounced the focus on a political and racial agenda as major weaknesses of Afro-Brazilian writing, and stressed, the need for aesthetic experimentation within the literary field. Writing Identity investigates how Afro-Brazilian writers maintained strong connections to the black movement in Brazil, and yet sought to fuse a social and racial agenda with more sophisticated literary practices. As active militants in the black movement, Quilombhoje authors strove to strengthen a collective sense of black identity for Afro-Brazilians.