Juvenile Nonfiction

This nonfiction picture book is a children’s version of NASA astronaut Jerry L. Ross’s autobiography, Spacewalker: My Journey in Space and Faith as NASA’s Record-Setting Frequent Flyer, designed for ages 7–12. Told in friendly first-person narration, it represents how Ross followed his dream from rural 1950s northern Indiana to Purdue University and then outer space.   The forty-page book is illustrated with personal photos and memorabilia. It is formatted into twenty-three narratives organized in chronological order illustrating events and experiences in Ross’s life. Pages attractively interweave photos and text while prompts encourage readers to engage in in the story.   Ross possessed specific character traits that helped him make choices and overcome obstacles as he struggled against the odds to realize his dream: curiosity, persistence, and believing in oneself. As the story unfolds and readers begin to make personal connections with Ross, his approach to problem solving and working through setbacks provides a powerful example for children.   Content area concepts are integrated throughout the story, including but not limited to science, technology, engineering, math, visual literacy, financial literacy, geography, flight, and the race to space. Gravity, for example, is a major theme illustrated within the content of the story. Online guides for teachers using the book in a classroom setting (third to fourth grade recommended) are linked to throughout.A map of the United States on the inside front cover invites children to follow the path of Ross’s journey from Crown Point, Indiana, to Kennedy Space Center. A timeline on the inside back cover compares and contrasts benchmark events in Ross’s life and career with important events in flight and space travel history. Further electronic materials are available at www.jerrylross.com.  
If you want to get downright buggy, pick up this wonderful collection of insect talesfrom the "Bug Bowl" guru, Tom Turpin. After you're through, you'll know more about the six-legged kingdom and its occupants than any bookworm that you run across. How does insect suturing work? Which insect did the ancient Egyptians worship as a god? What did Ogden Nash have to say about termites? Which insect produces "Turkey Red" dye? What bug has survived for 300 million years? How does a horse fly manage to fly without its head? Each tale is easily accessible, provides fun and scientific facts, and is self-contained. Juveniles and adults alike will be fascinated with the world of Turpin's bugs. The nicely illustrated collection won't give you ants in your pants, but just might put a flea in your ear.
The author of Flies in the Face of Fashion, Mites Make Right, and Other Bugdacious Tales is back with more ditties on the insect kingdom. Find out about Aesop's insects, Edgar Allan Poe's Gold Bug, and Ogden Nash's creepy crawlies. Dig up some facts on the Colorado and Japanese beetles, and cash in on the million dollar beetle. Head for cover, the Bombardier beetles are coming! If you're in the dark, hook up with a firefly. Bugs have been around longer than your great-great-grandma—400 million years before to be somewhat exact. Insects strolled around with dinosaurs and kept on going even when the behemoths disappeared. What's Buggin You Now? let's you catch the bug without the jar!