Language Arts & Disciplines

First-person narrative does not always fall under the genre of autobiography. In the centuries before the genre was defined, authors often patterned their personal narratives after prestigious discourses, such as hagiography, historiography, and the literary miscellany.Caballero noble desbaratado: Autobiografía e invención en el siglo XVI: "Noble Knight Disrupted: Autobiography and Invention in the Sixteenth Century analyzes several first-person narratives from Spain and the conditions of their writing and reception. It focuses on the sixteenth-century Libro de la vida y costumbres (Book of Life and Customs) by Alonso Enríquez de Guzmán (1499-1547), the knight of the title. One chapter looks at antecedents to the central work: the late fourteenth-century by Leonor López de Córdoba, who narrates difficult passages of her life; the Brief Summary of the Life and Deeds by Diego García de Paredes, who speaks of duels and battles as an object lesson in honor and courage for his son; and Cautiverio y trabajos Captivity and Travails by Diego Galán, a tale of captivity and flight in Muslim lands that constitutes an early example of fictionalized autobiography. The study also examines the influence of writers like Bartolomé de Torres Naharro, Antonio de Guevara, and Pedro Mexía and the vitality of lyric poetry on both sides of the Atlantic. Although the Biblioteca de Autores Españoles has devoted a volume to Enríquez de Guzmán, there has never been a book-length study dedicated to this author. This book fills that gap and constitutes a valuable contribution to the study of autobiography in Spanish.
Given the increasing attention to managing, publishing, and preserving research datasets as scholarly assets, what competencies in working with research data will graduate students in STEM disciplines need to be successful in their fields? And what role can librarians play in helping students attain these competencies? In addressing these questions, this book articulates a new area of opportunity for librarians and other information professionals, developing educational programs that introduce graduate students to the knowledge and skills needed to work with research data. The term “data information literacy” has been adopted with the deliberate intent of tying two emerging roles for librarians together. By viewing information literacy and data services as complementary rather than separate activities, the contributors seek to leverage the progress made and the lessons learned in each service area. The intent of the publication is to help librarians cultivate strategies and approaches for developing data information literacy programs of their own using the work done in the multiyear, IMLS-supported Data Information Literacy (DIL) project as real-world case studies. The initial chapters introduce the concepts and ideas behind data information literacy, such as the twelve data competencies. The middle chapters describe five case studies in data information literacy conducted at different institutions (Cornell, Purdue, Minnesota, Oregon), each focused on a different disciplinary area in science and engineering. They detail the approaches taken, how the programs were implemented, and the assessment metrics used to evaluate their impact. The later chapters include the “DIL Toolkit,” a distillation of the lessons learned, which is presented as a handbook for librarians interested in developing their own DIL programs. The book concludes with recommendations for future directions and growth of data information literacy. More information about the DIL project can be found on the project’s website: datainfolit.org.  
El intelectual y la cultura de masas, by Javier García Liendo, studies the responses of Ángel Rama (Uruguay) and José María Arguedas (Peru) to the effects of mass culture on Andean indigenous cultures and Latin American print culture during the second half of the twentieth century. It explores the part that Rama and Arguedas played in the conceptualization and promotion of new cultural spaces made possible by commodification and industrialization, as capitalism transformed the imaginaries and materialities that had shaped their cultural projects for Andean and Latin American cultures. Through a material analysis of print culture objects, in particular those resulting from Rama’s editorial ventures—such as pocket paperbacks and a popular encyclopedia—this work examines the transformations occurring at the time in Latin America at the level of production and circulation of culture, and thus sheds light on the emergence of new networks of communication between intellectuals and national and regional publics. Similarly, it explores the role of emergent communication technologies (sound recording and radio) in the reshaping of rural indigenous cultures into a mass-oriented popular culture in Peru. In this context, Arguedas’s work with folklore and his later involvement in the Andean popular music scene in Lima are studied as responses to a violent process of commercialization of traditional Andean musical culture, a result of mass migration from rural areas to cities and urbanization. Finally, this book presents an understanding of Rama and Arguedas that transcends their categorization as literary critic and writer, respectively, by analyzing their work through the concept of practice, which encompasses the totality of their work, including journalism, anthropology, folklore, editorial work, intellectual networking, and cultural promotion. Its chapters invite a rethinking of established notions of the relation between culture and capitalism during the heyday of revolution in the Latin American intellectual field.
This book is both a themed volume on translation and a Festschrift for Leonard J. Greenspoon, the Philip M. and Ethel Klutznick Professor in Jewish Civilization and professor of classical and near Eastern studies and of theology at Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. Professor Greenspoon has made significant contributions to the study of Jewish biblical translations, particularly the ancient translation of the Hebrew Bible into Greek, known as the Septuagint. In this volume, an internationally renowned group of scholars presents a wide range of essays on Bible translation, the influence of culture on biblical translation, Bible translations’ reciprocal influence on culture, and the translation of various Jewish texts and collections, especially the Septuagint.
This book offers original research by leading scholars from the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, France, and Russia, which covers the central areas of Shpet's work on phenomenology, philosophy of language, cultural theory, and aesthetics and takes forward the current state of knowledge and debates on his contribution to these fields of enquiry. The book also contains, for the first time in English translation, the most seminal portions of Shpet's book-length study of hermeneutics, which is his most significant work for contemporary students of cultural theory. The first part of the book maps out Shpet's legacy in the main areas of his multi-faceted work; the second part examines in closer detail particular aspects of Shpet's philosophical affiliations and contributions in the framework of cultural theory, phenomenology, hermeneutics, and in the field of Russian intellectual history; the final part features the publication of extracts from Shpet's 1918 book on hermeneutics.
Knights of the Quill offers a unique assessment of war correspondence in Southern newspapers during the American Civil War. The men and women who covered the battles and political developments for Southern newspapers were of a different breed than those who reported the war for the North. They were doctors, lawyers, teachers, editors, and businessmen, nearly all of them with college and professional degrees. Sleeping on beds of snow, dining on raw corn and burned bread, they exhibited a dedication that laid the groundwork for news gathering in the twenty-first century. Objectivity and accuracy became important news values, as shows that Southern war correspondence easily equaled in quality the work produced by reporters for Northern newspapers. With its emphasis on primary sources, the book offers an important and enduring historical perspective on the Civil War and also meets the highest standards of historical scholarship.  
Is Brazil part of Latin America, or an island unto itself? As Nossa and Nuestra América: Inter-American Dialogues demonstrates, this question has been debated by Brazilian and Spanish American intellectuals alike since the early nineteenth century, though it has received limited scholarly attention and its answer is less obvious than you might think.This book charts Brazil’s evolving and often conflicted relationship with the idea of Latin America through a detailed comparative investigation of four crucial Latin American essayists: Uruguayan critic José Enrique Rodó, Brazilian writer-diplomat Joaquim Nabuco, Mexican humanist Alfonso Reyes, and Sérgio Buarque de Holanda, one of Brazil’s preeminent historians. While these writers are canonical figures in their respective national literary traditions, their thoughts on Brazilian–Spanish American relations are seldom investigated, and they are rarely approached from a comparative perspective. In Nossa and Nuestra América, Newcomb traces the development of two parallel essayistic traditions: Spanish American continentalist discourse and Brazil’s solidly national exegetic tradition. With these essayistic traditions in mind, he argues that Brazil plays a necessary—and necessarily problematic—role in the intellectual construction of “Latin America.” Further, in traversing the Luso-Hispanic frontier and bringing four of Latin America’s preeminent thinkers into critical dialogue, Newcomb calls for a truly comparative approach to Luso-Brazilian and Spanish American literary and cultural studies. Nossa and Nuestra América will be of interest to scholars and students of Latin American and Luso-Brazilian literature and ideas, and to anyone interested in rethinking comparative approaches to literary texts written in Portuguese and Spanish.
Why are twentieth-century novelists from former British colonies in the Americas preoccupied with British Romantic poetry? In Romantic Revisions, Lauren Rule Maxwell examines five novels—Kincaid's Lucy, Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, McCarthy's Blood Meridian, Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, and Harris's Palace of the Peacock—that contain crucial scenes engaging British Romantic poetry. Each work adapts figures from British Romantic poetry and translates them into an American context. Kincaid relies on the repeated image of the daffodil, Atwood displaces Lucy, McCarthy upends the American arcadia, Fitzgerald heaps Keatsian images of excess, and Harris transforms the albatross. In her close readings, Maxwell suggests that the novels reframe Romantic poetry to allegorically confront empire, revealing how subjectivity is shaped by considerations of place and power. Returning to British Romantic poetry allows the novels to extend the Romantic poetics of landscape that traditionally considered the British subject’s relation to place. By recasting Romantic poetics in the Americas, these novels show how negotiations of identity and power are defined by the legacies of British imperialism, illustrating that these nations, their peoples, and their works of art are truly postcolonial. While many postcolonial scholars and critics have dismissed the idea that Romantic poetry can be used to critique colonialism, Maxwell suggests that, on the contrary, it has provided contemporary writers across the Americas with a means of charting the literary and cultural legacies of British imperialism in the New World. The poems of the British Romantics offer postcolonial writers particularly rich material, Maxwell argues, because they characterize British influence at the height of the British empire. In explaining how the novels adapt figures from British Romantic poetry, Romantic Revisions provides scholars and students working in postcolonial studies, Romanticism, and English-language literature with a new look at politics of location in the Americas.
Some of the most important writers of the twentieth century, including Borges, Cortázar, Rulfo, and García Márquez, have explored ambiguous sites of a disquieting nature. Their characters face merging perspectives, deferral, darkness, or emptiness. Such a space is neither a site of projection (as utopia or dystopia) nor a neutral setting (as the topos). For the characters, it is real and active, at once elusive and transforming. Despite the challenges of visualizing such slippery spaces, filmic experimentations in Spanish American cinema since the 1960s have sought to adapt these texts to the screen. Ilka Kressner’s Sites of Disquiet examines these representations of alternative dimensions in Spanish American short narratives and their transformations to the cinematic screen. The study is informed by contemporary critical approaches to spatiality, especially the concepts of atopos (non-space), spaces of mobility, sites of différance, of a self-effacing presence, and sonic spaces. Kressner’s comparative study of textual and cinematic constructions of non-spaces highlights the potential and limits of inter-arts adaptation. Film not only portrays the sites in ways that are intrinsic to the medium, but during the cinematic translation, it further develops the textual presentations of space. Text and film illuminate each other in their renderings of echoes, gaps, absences, and radical openness. The shared focus of the two media on precarious spaces highlights their awareness of the physical and situational conditions in the works. Therefore, it vindicates the import of space and dwelling, and the often underestimated impact of surroundings on the human body and mind. Despite their heterogeneity, the artistic elaborations of these ambivalent atopoi all share a liberating impulse: they assert creative and open-ended interactions with space where volatility ceases to be a negative term.
Text and Image in Modern European Culture is a collection of essays that are transnational and interdisciplinary in scope. Employing a range of innovative comparative approaches to reassess and undermine traditional boundaries between art forms and national cultures, the contributors shed new light on the relations between literature and the visual arts in Europe after 1850. Following tenets of comparative cultural studies, work presented in this volume explores international creative dialogues between writers and visual artists, ekphrasis in literature, literature and design (fashion, architecture), hybrid texts (visual poetry, surrealist pocket museums, poetic photo-texts), and text and image relations under the impact of modern technologies (avant-garde experiments, digital poetry).   The discussion encompasses pivotal fin de siècle, modernist, and postmodernist works and movements in Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Russia, and Spain. A selected bibliography of work published in the field is also included. The volume will appeal to scholars of comparative literature, art history, and visual studies, and it includes contributions appropriate for supplementary reading in senior undergraduate and graduate seminars.   Contents: “Introduction to Text and Image in Modern European Culture” (Robert Lethbridge); Part One, Cross-Cultural Networks: “The Myth of Psyche in the Work of D'Annunzio and Burne-Jones” (Giuliana Pieri); “The Symbolist Context of the Siren Motif in Moreau's Painting and Bryusov's Poetry” (Natasha Grigorian); “Images of Paris in the Work of Brassaï and Miller” (Caroline Blinder); Part Two, Ekphrasis and Beyond:  “The Reciprocation of the Image in Two Poems by Rilke” (William Waters); “Photography and Painting in Proust's A la recherche du temps perdu" (Thomas Baldwin); "Photography in Proust's A la recherche du temps perdu" (Áine Larkin); Part Three, Text and Design: "Text and Image in Fashion Periodicals of the Second French Empire" (Kate Nelson Best); "Architecture and Utopia in Scheerbart's Rakkóx der Billionär" (Christine Angela Knoop); Part Four, Hybrid Texts: "Word and Image in Apollinaire's 'Lettre-Océan'" (Margaret Rigaud-Drayton); "Text-Image Relations in French and Spanish Surrealist Literary Reviews from the 1920s and 1930s" (Alicia Kent); "How to Read a Poetic Photo-Text" (Joanna Madloch); Part Five, Multimedia Encounters: "Constructivist and Futurist Multimedia Experiments in Russian Poetry" (Svetlana Nikitina); "Science and Symptom from Mallarmé to the Digital Poet" (Emile Fromet de Rosnay); Part Six, Thematic Bibliography: "Bibliography for the Study of Text and Image in Modern European Culture" (Natasha Grigorian).    
The C-SPAN Archives records, indexes, and preserves all C-SPAN programming for historical, educational, and research uses. Every C-SPAN program aired since 1987, from all House and Senate sessions in the US Congress, to hearings, presidential speeches, conventions, and campaign events, totaling over 200,000 hours, is contained in the video library and is immediately and freely accessible through the database and electronic archival systems developed and maintained by staff. Whereas C-SPAN is best known as a resource for political processes and policy information, the Archives also offers rich educational research and teaching opportunities. This book provides guidance and inspiration to scholars who may be interested in using the Archives to illuminate concepts and processes in varied communication and political science subfields using a range of methodologies for discovery, learning, and engagement. Applications described range from teaching rhetoric to enhancing TV audience’s viewing experience. The book links to illustrative clips from the Archives to help readers appreciate the usability and richness of the source material and the pedagogical possibilities it offers. Many of the essays are authored by faculty connected with the Purdue University School of Communication, named after the founder of C-SPAN Brian Lamb. The book is divided into four parts: Part 1 consists of an overview of the C-SPAN Archives, the technology involved in establishing and updating its online presence, and the C-SPAN copyright and use policy. Featured are the ways in which the collection is indexed and tips on how individuals can find particular materials. This section provides an essential foundation for scholars’ and practitioners’ increased use of this valuable resource. Parts 2 and 3 contain case studies describing how scholars use the Archives in their research, teaching, and engagement activities. Some case studies were first presented during a preconference at the National Communication Association (NCA) convention in November 2013, while others have been invited or solicited through open calls. Part 4 explores future directions for C-SPAN Archive use as a window into American life and global politics.   Table of Contents Introduction   Part I: Overview of the C-SPAN Archives. Introduction to C-SPAN, its mission, and its academic commitment (Susan Swain, President and co-CEO, C-SPAN) Introduction to the C-SPAN Video Library (Robert X. Browning, Director, C-SPAN Archives) Commentary (Brian Lamb, Founder and Executive Chairperson, C-SPAN)   Part II: Research Case Studies Preserving Black Political Agency in the Age of Obama: Utilizing the C-SPAN Video Archives in Rhetorical Scholarship (Theon E. Hill, Westchester University) Using the C-SPAN Archives to Enhance the Production and Dissemination of News (Stephanie E. Bor, University of Nevada Reno) Designing Multidisciplinary C-SPAN Design Teams (William Oakes and Carla Zoltowksi, Purdue University) Measuring Emotion in Public Figures using the C-SPAN Archives (Christopher Kowal, Purdue University)  Enhancing the C-SPAN Archives with Non-Textual Sentiment and Communicative Metadata (Sorin Matei, Purdue University) Going “Beyond the Headlines”: The C-SPAN Archives, Grassroots’ 84, and New Directions in American Political History (Kathryn Cramer Brownell, Purdue University)  Deference in the District: An Analysis of Congressional Town Hall Meetings from the C-SPAN Video Library (Colene Lind, University of Texas at Austin)   Part III: Teaching Case Studies PICC: Learning from C-SPAN as an Educational Tool and Resource (Carolyn Curiel, Purdue University)  Using the C-SPAN Archives to Teach Mass Communication Theory (Glenn Sparks, Purdue University)  Teaching American Government Concepts Using C-SPAN (Robert X Browning, Purdue University)  Creating a Playlist of Communication Scholars Featured in the C-SPAN Archives (Trevor Parry-Giles, National Communication Association)   Part IV: Future Possibilities  C-SPAN Archives Distinguished Lecture (Roderick P. Hart, University of Texas at Austin)  Reflections on the Potential and Challenges for Discovery, Learning, and Engagement (Robert Browning and Patrice M. Buzzanell, Purdue University)  
Almost one hundred presentations from the thirty-third annual Charleston Library Conference (held November 6–9, 2013) are included in this annual proceedings volume. Major themes of the meeting included open access publishing, demand-driven acquisition, the future of university presses, and data-driven decision making. While the Charleston meeting remains a core one for acquisitions librarians in dialog with publishers and vendors, the breadth of coverage of this volume reflects the fact that this conference is now one of the major venues for leaders in the publishing and library communities to shape strategy and prepare for the future. At least 1,500 delegates attended the 2013 meeting, ranging from the staff of small public library systems to the CEOs of major corporations. This fully indexed, copyedited volume provides a rich source for the latest evidence-based research and lessons from practice in a range of information science fields. The contributors are leaders in the library, publishing, and vendor communities.
Over one hundred presentations from the 35th annual Charleston Library Conference (held November 4–7, 2015) are included in this annual proceedings volume. Major themes of the meeting included streaming video, analysis and assessment, demand-driven acquisition, the future of university presses, and open access publishing. While the Charleston meeting remains a core one for acquisitions librarians in dialog with publishers and vendors, the breadth of coverage of this volume reflects the fact that this conference is now one of the major venues for leaders in the publishing and library communities to shape strategy and prepare for the future. Almost 1,800 delegates attended the 2015 meeting, ranging from the staff of small public library systems to the CEOs of major corporations. This fully indexed, copyedited volume provides a rich source for the latest evidence-based research and lessons from practice in a range of information science fields. The contributors are leaders in the library, publishing, and vendor communities.
In 1948, the noted book designer and Purdue alumnus Bruce Rogers wrote a book that documented and illustrated his creation of the Centaur typeface. The book was privately printed by Rogers himself under the name of his studio, October House. This limited edition of the book was transferred to the Purdue Libraries at the time of his death along with his other papers and books. Over the years the remaining stock has found its home in the Special Collections of the Libraries. And although known as something of a collector's item by those who are aware of the few copies in circulation, it is here available to the general market for the first time. Centaur Types is a fascinating book for several reasons: in the designer's own words, we learn of the evolution of the typeface and of his interest in the art and craft of creating type; it demonstrates different and comparable typefaces, and gives examples of Centaur from six to seventy-two point; and lastly, it stands as a fitting example of fine book-making from one of the master book designers of his time.
Epimetheus has largely been forgotten, and yet, he was once credited with bringing humans into the world naked, unshod, without bed, and unarmed. Rather than view this condition as one of deficiency to be covered over through some kind of technical artifice, Commemorating Epimetheus describes the human condition positively in terms of its state of origin. In other words, Amis seeks to articulate the goodness of fragility. The goodness of our fragility is approached phenomenologically and described in terms of sharing, caring, meeting, dwelling, and loving. These ways of existing with one another are not merely accidental characteristics of human beings or accidental characteristics of our relations with one another, but are inherently human. That is, we come into the world dependent on the care of others; we come to share in humanness through their care, and their care enables us to meet others, dwell with others, and, perhaps, love others. Commemorating Epimetheus investigates being human in terms of our relationships with one another.
"With this important treatise on the contemporary philosophy of interpretation, Schrag takes his stand at the leading edge of hermeneutic discussion. . . . Highly recommended."-Choice"He (Schrag) marvelously exemplifies and practices the ideal of philosophy as a reflective overcoming of one-sidedness. . . . His book is well worth reading for an up-to-date, state of the art discussion of the most fundamental issues in the debate between modernism and post-modernism."-Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology"Calvin O. Schrag is one of those remarkable writers who can draw widely from the diverse and complex work of contemporary philosophy, and do so without sacrificing detailed interpretation."-International Studies in Philosophy"The presentation is as vigilant and original as it is knowledgeable and lucid." -Phenomenological Inquiry
Stephanie Hainsfurther, who has more than 600 articles in print, and Emily Esteron, the editor of the New Mexico Business Weekly, provide an insiders look at breaking into the writing world. Each chapter of Covering the Business Beat is packed full of tips and tried practices to clarify the path to journalistic success. To aid the reader, the authors have provided thoughtful "to do" lists, interviews with magazine editors and content collectors, concise chat boxes covering specific topics like "Myths and Truths About Query Letters," and an appendix listing additional reading sources. By "telling it like it is," Hainsfurther and Esteron have provided a roadmap to get your byline in print. A valuable resource for aspiring writers, writing students, and writers who need a new angle on the business of writing.
This book provides a basic primer on how to create successful and effective teams. It is appropriate for large, medium, or small non-profit or for-profit organizations. The practical tips included in this book detail a wide array of team-oriented helpful hints. These practical application tools can be utilized to improve teams if they already exist. If teams do not exist, it provides a step-by-step process in creating a team-oriented environment, such as how to create a team culture in the organization and a specific organizational design that will make teams more effective. It also covers the essentials of teamwork that are critical to making teams effective. The orientation of this book offers a new paradigm for selecting and managing teams. It differs from other books as it describes exactly how to match the right people for each team. Each team player has two roles to bring to a team-their functional/professional role based on their expertise (i.e. a financial background), and a team competency role that is based on their innate personal strengths. Creating Effective and Successful Teams describes how to leverage each team member's functional/professional-based competencies with a set of personality-based competencies that can translate into a particular team role they would best play to make teams effective and successful.
Interviews with some of the country's top literary figures, including Charles Baxter, Charles Simic, Donald Revell, Gerald Stern, Sandra Gilbert, Catherine Bowman, Campbell McGrath, and a previously unpublished interview with Russell Banks, are anthologized for the first time in this compelling collection
Any examination of contemporary society must recognize a central place for information and communication processes and for the technologies and institutions on which they rely, particularly for public communication. The essays in this volume juxtapose two central concepts of recent social and political thought -- civil society and information society - and relate them to the complex nature of contemporary public communication.A number of authors, including several contributors to this collection, argue that on the eve of the twenty-first century, civil society is beginning to disintegrate everywhere. In this volume, fifteen scholars from ten different countries address that argument by problematizing the relation between the older concept, civil society, and the newer one, information society, and offering perspectives on future directions.
Craig Smith has provided an introduction and edition of John Macksoud's Other Illusions. This posthumous work, completed in 1973, reinforces a strain of relativistic theory that retrieves the Sophists and extends through Jacques Derrida to the present where many of us deal with constructed realities in our rhetorical theories. Macksoud was also offering a warning about pseudo-scientific research, a Philipic against the quantitative approach to communication theory. He not only attempted to reveal the rhetorical nature of their use of the scientific method, he tried to show that science itself was at base rhetorical. In form, the short book threatened the established order of the academic community. The book uses anecdotes, sayings, stories, and even jokes to mark off sections and to initiate new lines of thought. These devices were deemed subversive rather than performative because they are rarely, if ever, used in academic prose and because the messages they carry undercut normal ways of thinking.
Lincoln's Censor examines the effect of government suppression on the Democratic press in Indiana during the spring of 1863. Indiana's Democratic newspaper editors were subject to Milo S. Hascall's General Order Number Nine, which proclaimed that all newspaper editors and public speakers that encouraged resistance to the draft or any other war measure would be treated as traitors. Brigadier General Hascall, commander of the District of Indiana, was amplifying General Order Number Thirty-eight of Major General Ambrose Everts Burnside, the commander of the Department of the Ohio. Burnside's order declared that criticism of the president and the war effort was tantamount to "declaring sympathies with the enemy." Eleven Democratic newspapers in Indiana faced suspension.
The study of biography has leaped from surveys of biographical writing and statements of biographical, practice to semiotic and poststructaralist discussions of, the modality of biography without adequate consideration of what has already been done to the theory of biography. Professor Novarr has closed that gap with a comprehensive and judicious historical survey and assessment of a I the major (and many of the minor) statements made about biography in the crucial period 188D-1970. The Lines of Life describes the diversity and complexity of theories of biography in the thirty years prior to the publication of Eminent Victorians and makes clear the importance of the ideas of Lesile Stephen, Sidney Lee, Edmund Gosse, and William Roscoe Thayer. It provides for the exciting decade after Eminent Victorians, rigorous assessments of the work of Harold Nicolson, Andre Maurois, Virginia Woolf, and Hesketh Pearson. It shows how theorists and critics in the fifties hedged on the question of biography as art. It traces, in the work of writers like David Cecil, Leon Edel, Mark Schorer, Paul Murray Kendall, and others, the nature of the relation between biographer and subject, the concept that biography is essentially the interpretation of one mind by another, and the idea that the biographer's angle of vision is both inevitable and important
Perspective on Philosophy of Communication provides readers with an appreciation of philosophy of communication as central to understanding and guiding communicative action in a postmodern culture. Each chapter provides readers with an understanding of the perspective of a well-recognized philosopher(s) and addresses how his/her work creatively informs current problems and issues in human communication. This work provides an opportunity for readers to engage the interpretive, creative, and ultimately pragmatic spirit of selected philosophers who open the possibilities of communicative content in different ways.
A compilation of Irving Howe’s interviews during the last fifteen years of his life, this book represents what could be viewed as the sequel to Howe’s intellectual autobiography, A Margin of Hope, which took the story of his life only up to the late 1970s. Many of these interviews were never published and have existed only as personal tapes in the hands of such scholars and activists as Todd Gitlin and Maurice Isserman. Others were originally published in such venues as The New York Times, The Jerusalem Post, and the PBS documentary Arguing the World. Howe never organized his thoughts about the last fifteen years of his life, during which he gained renown for World of Our Fathers, received a MacArthur Fellowship, and became widely regarded as the leading left-liberal intellectual in the U.S. and, arguably, the leading literary critic in America following the deaths of Lionel Trilling and Edmund Wilson. During this time, Howe also struggled to redefine the American Left in an environment that discounted and marginalized it. Indeed, these interviews may have particular significance today, a period of new opportunities for the liberal Left, yet one in which it struggles to construct some coherent identity and compelling program. The editors worked with the full cooperation of Howe’s family. His daughter, Nina, contributed an afterword and provided a number of illustrations and photos that have never before appeared in print.