Language Arts & Disciplines

This book provides a basic primer on how to create successful and effective teams. It is appropriate for large, medium, or small non-profit or for-profit organizations. The practical tips included in this book detail a wide array of team-oriented helpful hints. These practical application tools can be utilized to improve teams if they already exist. If teams do not exist, it provides a step-by-step process in creating a team-oriented environment, such as how to create a team culture in the organization and a specific organizational design that will make teams more effective. It also covers the essentials of teamwork that are critical to making teams effective. The orientation of this book offers a new paradigm for selecting and managing teams. It differs from other books as it describes exactly how to match the right people for each team. Each team player has two roles to bring to a team-their functional/professional role based on their expertise (i.e. a financial background), and a team competency role that is based on their innate personal strengths. Creating Effective and Successful Teams describes how to leverage each team member's functional/professional-based competencies with a set of personality-based competencies that can translate into a particular team role they would best play to make teams effective and successful.
Interviews with some of the country's top literary figures, including Charles Baxter, Charles Simic, Donald Revell, Gerald Stern, Sandra Gilbert, Catherine Bowman, Campbell McGrath, and a previously unpublished interview with Russell Banks, are anthologized for the first time in this compelling collection
Any examination of contemporary society must recognize a central place for information and communication processes and for the technologies and institutions on which they rely, particularly for public communication. The essays in this volume juxtapose two central concepts of recent social and political thought -- civil society and information society - and relate them to the complex nature of contemporary public communication.A number of authors, including several contributors to this collection, argue that on the eve of the twenty-first century, civil society is beginning to disintegrate everywhere. In this volume, fifteen scholars from ten different countries address that argument by problematizing the relation between the older concept, civil society, and the newer one, information society, and offering perspectives on future directions.
Craig Smith has provided an introduction and edition of John Macksoud's Other Illusions. This posthumous work, completed in 1973, reinforces a strain of relativistic theory that retrieves the Sophists and extends through Jacques Derrida to the present where many of us deal with constructed realities in our rhetorical theories. Macksoud was also offering a warning about pseudo-scientific research, a Philipic against the quantitative approach to communication theory. He not only attempted to reveal the rhetorical nature of their use of the scientific method, he tried to show that science itself was at base rhetorical. In form, the short book threatened the established order of the academic community. The book uses anecdotes, sayings, stories, and even jokes to mark off sections and to initiate new lines of thought. These devices were deemed subversive rather than performative because they are rarely, if ever, used in academic prose and because the messages they carry undercut normal ways of thinking.
Lincoln's Censor examines the effect of government suppression on the Democratic press in Indiana during the spring of 1863. Indiana's Democratic newspaper editors were subject to Milo S. Hascall's General Order Number Nine, which proclaimed that all newspaper editors and public speakers that encouraged resistance to the draft or any other war measure would be treated as traitors. Brigadier General Hascall, commander of the District of Indiana, was amplifying General Order Number Thirty-eight of Major General Ambrose Everts Burnside, the commander of the Department of the Ohio. Burnside's order declared that criticism of the president and the war effort was tantamount to "declaring sympathies with the enemy." Eleven Democratic newspapers in Indiana faced suspension.
The study of biography has leaped from surveys of biographical writing and statements of biographical, practice to semiotic and poststructaralist discussions of, the modality of biography without adequate consideration of what has already been done to the theory of biography. Professor Novarr has closed that gap with a comprehensive and judicious historical survey and assessment of a I the major (and many of the minor) statements made about biography in the crucial period 188D-1970. The Lines of Life describes the diversity and complexity of theories of biography in the thirty years prior to the publication of Eminent Victorians and makes clear the importance of the ideas of Lesile Stephen, Sidney Lee, Edmund Gosse, and William Roscoe Thayer. It provides for the exciting decade after Eminent Victorians, rigorous assessments of the work of Harold Nicolson, Andre Maurois, Virginia Woolf, and Hesketh Pearson. It shows how theorists and critics in the fifties hedged on the question of biography as art. It traces, in the work of writers like David Cecil, Leon Edel, Mark Schorer, Paul Murray Kendall, and others, the nature of the relation between biographer and subject, the concept that biography is essentially the interpretation of one mind by another, and the idea that the biographer's angle of vision is both inevitable and important
Perspective on Philosophy of Communication provides readers with an appreciation of philosophy of communication as central to understanding and guiding communicative action in a postmodern culture. Each chapter provides readers with an understanding of the perspective of a well-recognized philosopher(s) and addresses how his/her work creatively informs current problems and issues in human communication. This work provides an opportunity for readers to engage the interpretive, creative, and ultimately pragmatic spirit of selected philosophers who open the possibilities of communicative content in different ways.
A compilation of Irving Howe’s interviews during the last fifteen years of his life, this book represents what could be viewed as the sequel to Howe’s intellectual autobiography, A Margin of Hope, which took the story of his life only up to the late 1970s. Many of these interviews were never published and have existed only as personal tapes in the hands of such scholars and activists as Todd Gitlin and Maurice Isserman. Others were originally published in such venues as The New York Times, The Jerusalem Post, and the PBS documentary Arguing the World. Howe never organized his thoughts about the last fifteen years of his life, during which he gained renown for World of Our Fathers, received a MacArthur Fellowship, and became widely regarded as the leading left-liberal intellectual in the U.S. and, arguably, the leading literary critic in America following the deaths of Lionel Trilling and Edmund Wilson. During this time, Howe also struggled to redefine the American Left in an environment that discounted and marginalized it. Indeed, these interviews may have particular significance today, a period of new opportunities for the liberal Left, yet one in which it struggles to construct some coherent identity and compelling program. The editors worked with the full cooperation of Howe’s family. His daughter, Nina, contributed an afterword and provided a number of illustrations and photos that have never before appeared in print.
Merrell's specific focus in this interdisciplinary study is the modernism/postmodernism dichotomy and Peirce's precocious realization that the world does not lend itself to the simplistic binarism of modernist thought. In Merrell's examination of postmodern phenomena, the reader is taken through various facets of the cognitive sciences, philosophy of science, mathematics, and literary theory. Throughout this work, Merrell. is scrupulously aware that we are participants within, not detached spectators of, our signs. We understand them while we interact with them, during which process we, and our signs as well, invariably undergo change
In 1948, the noted book designer and Purdue alumnus Bruce Rogers wrote a book that documented and illustrated his creation of the Centaur typeface. The book was privately printed by Rogers himself under the name of his studio, October House. This limited edition of the book was transferred to the Purdue Libraries at the time of his death along with his other papers and books. Over the years the remaining stock has found its home in the Special Collections of the Libraries. And although known as something of a collector's item by those who are aware of the few copies in circulation, it is here available to the general market for the first time. Centaur Types is a fascinating book for several reasons: in the designer's own words, we learn of the evolution of the typeface and of his interest in the art and craft of creating type; it demonstrates different and comparable typefaces, and gives examples of Centaur from six to seventy-two point; and lastly, it stands as a fitting example of fine book-making from one of the master book designers of his time.
Volume 6 of The Year in C-SPAN Archives Research series focuses on the rapidly changing rhetoric coloring American politics. An increasingly polarized electorate combined with advances in technology have led to a combative and pitched rhetoric through more and more outlets. Each chapter is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing on communication studies, political science, history, and other fields. Using the extensive collection of the C-SPAN Video Library, chapters cover the highly visible Thomas and Kavanaugh judicial nomination hearings as well as the ongoing debate around impeachment. Other pieces focus on the rhetoric of the 2008 Wall Street crisis, presidential campaign announcements, White House press conferences, floor time by women in the House of Representatives, the use of Twitter by legislators, and the puzzle of zero population growth. Collectively, they paint a picture of how Congress and the president approach the broad topic of political rhetoric using C-SPAN video as the basis for their research. The C-SPAN Video Library is unique because there is no other research collection that is based on video research of contemporary politics. Methodologically distinctive, much of the research uses new techniques to analyze video, text, and spoken words of political leaders. No other book examines such a wide range of topics—from immigration to climate change to race relations—using video as the basis for research.
The Three Person Solution resolves problems with human interaction by formalizing three person relationships. Two against one dynamics disappear. Double binds dissolve. A collaborative relational practice becomes possible for many people. Two person relationships benefit indirectly. Our tendency is to view any three person interaction in classic dramatic terms, but the structure of this relational practice, called Threeing, is not a narrative structure. The Three do not interact dramatically following a story line to an ending. Rather, the Three interact recursively, following a circuit that balances relationships. To partake in the process of Threeing, narrative expectations must be abandoned. The practice of Threeing can keep relationships healthy and thriving in family settings, intercultural situations, educational programs, collaborative research, collaborative art making, peace making, governance, management, online groups, worker training and environmental initiatives. This book includes an explanation of the theory of Threeing based on the cybernetics of Gregory Bateson and the philosophy of Charles Peirce, examples of Threeing in education and worker training, and detailed instructions for using the Three Person Solution.
Without Covers:// literary_magazines@the_digital_edge is a unique insider's look at how literary magazines have adapted to the arrival of the Internet age. Written by editors, writers, and poets, this authoritative collection covers a range of topics - from the overall financial challenges to the more mundane question of how to number the initial online volume of a 30-year old journal.Nineteen essays delve into the philosophical and practical issues surrounding the digital transformation of a variety of literary magazines. Essays include: "What is a Book?" "From Mimeograph to html: Literary Magazines Online," "the Editor in an Internet Age," "Epublishing and Literature: Challenge and Opportunity," "The Literary Magazine, the Web, and the Changing of the Avant-Garde," and much more.
Without Covers:// literary_magazines@the_digital_edge is a unique insider's look at how literary magazines have adapted to the arrival of the Internet age. Written by editors, writers, and poets, this authoritative collection covers a range of topics - from the overall financial challenges to the more mundane question of how to number the initial online volume of a 30-year old journal.
Words at War: The Civil War and American Journalism analyzes the various ways in which the nation's newspaper editors, reporters, and war correspondents covered the biggest story of their lives-the Civil War-and in doing so both reflected and shaped the responses of their readers. The four sections of the book, Fighting Words, Confederates and Copperheads, The Union Forever, and Continuing Conflict trace the evolving role of the press in the antebellum, wartime, and postwar periods.