Leadership

Walther Leisler Kiep is one of the most independent and influential German post-war politicians. He is also a successful entrepreneur and longtime chairman of Atlantik-Brücke, the influential German-American friendship organization, which he now serves as honorary chairman.   In his autobiography, Kiep speaks frankly about a life at the center of power: as an independent politician and treasurer of the governing CDU party from 1970 to 1991, who did not shrink from conflict with party leaders Helmut Kohl and Franz Josef Strauss; as Minister of Finance in Lower Saxony; as a longtime member of the Volkswagen Supervisory board for 21 years; and as an ambassador for German-American relations, and confidant of several US presidents. As well as presenting an inside history of the relationship between Germany and the United States, the book sheds particular light on the struggle for German unification and that country’s complex relationship with the Middle East.   "One of Germany’s most distinguished statesmen, Dr. Walther Leisler Kiep has come to personify the commitment of postwar German leaders to close German-American relations. It was a distinct pleasure for me to collaborate with Walther, and I deeply valued his wise counsel. Through his ongoing passionate and persistent contributions as a leading foreign policy voice in Germany and as longtime chairman of Atlantik-Bruecke, Dr. Kiep has played an extraordinary role in building trust and mutual understanding between our two countries. His memoir is an invaluable addition to our understanding of international diplomacy."—Lee H. Hamilton, former Congressman and Co-Chair of the 9/11 Commission, former Director of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and presently Director of the Center on Congress at Indiana University   “Kiep is an entertaining storyteller, and he shows a good sense of narrative pace. His memoirs are also of immediate relevance for scholars of international history. Over the past decade, historians have been eager to uncover the activities of ‘transnational,’ nongovernmental actors, as opposed to formal government-to-government relations. From this standpoint, Kiep’s wide-ranging activities as a diplomatic and financial troubleshooter are illuminating,”—William Glenn Gray, Purdue University.
The late J. Kirby Risk II called himself “a small-town businessman from the banks of the Wabash.” He was much more. The fastidious, dapper man from Lafayette, Indiana, exuded philanthropy and free enterprise. Like a sheepdog, he tended the flock, rounded up strays, darted to key places to close up stragglers, and nudged everyone toward a common goal. Sometimes his stubborn persistence caused clashes. His demanding behavior was for good, no matter what others thought. That was Kirby’s way.   Kirby’s integrity was the basis for his two occupations. His first career was compassion, and his second career was the building of the battery company he cofounded in 1926 with $500 borrowed from his father. Today, Kirby Risk Corporation is a multimillion-dollar electrical products and services industry headquartered in Lafayette, Indiana, and led by Kirby’s son, Jim.   Kirby’s Way captures the essence of this imitable gentleman, who with his wife of fifty-five years, Caroline, raised four children, gave time, money, and meals to strangers, refugees, Purdue University students, and their beloved community, while building from their kitchen table a successful Midwest corporation. He believed in “sacrificial service.” Kirby noticed people. He recognized their importance. In turn, they loved him and wanted to help him. He dwelled on his favorite song, “Mankind is My Business.” Relationships shaped his success. Kirby was quiet about his deeds. He lived the Bible passage, Matthew 6:3—“But when you do a kindness to someone, do it secretly—do not tell your left hand what your right hand is doing.”   Kirby Risk may not have wanted this book. Yet he would have esteemed it as a parable, a spiritual truth that compels readers to discover certainties for themselves. From heaven, he tends the flock and rounds up strays, so more people might live Kirby’s Way.
Veterinary medicine has undergone sweeping changes in the last few decades. Women now account for 55 percent of the active veterinarians in the field, and nearly 80 percent of veterinary students are women. However, average salaries have dropped as this shift has occurred, and even with women in the vast majority, only 25 percent of leadership roles are held by women.   These trends point to gender-based inequality that veterinary medicine, a profession that tilts so heavily toward women, is struggling to address. How will the profession respond? What will this mean for our students and schools? What will it mean for our pets entrusted to veterinarian care? Who has succeeded in these situations? Who is taking action to lead change? What can we learn from them to lead the pack in our lives?   Leaders of the Pack, by Julie Kumble and Dr. Donald Smith, explores key themes in leadership and highlights women in veterinary medicine whose stories embody those themes. In it, Kumble and Smith cull over three years of interviews to profile a wide variety of women as they share triumphs and challenges, lucky as well as tough breaks, and the sound advice and words that inspired them to take their careers in unanticipated directions. By sharing unique stories that illuminate different paths to leadership and reflecting on best practices through commentary and research, Leaders of the Pack will allow more female leaders to create wider pathways to the top of their profession.
Choosing the right people to carry out a project is essential to its success. When multiple projects are combined into a complex program, the “human aspect” becomes even more important. This book is the first to truly balance a complete account of the technical aspects of project and program management with a practical approach to understanding and developing the core competencies required to accomplish desired goals. Drawing on almost thirty years of senior managerial experience in the defense and software industries, where the successful completion of multimillion-dollar projects is a strategic imperative, the author has a unique understanding of both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of program management. On the technical side, this book is a complete introduction to predicting costs, setting schedules, and assessing risks. On the people side, it sheds new light on how to mold different personality types into a team, how to motivate the team’s members, and how to produce extraordinary results.   After exploring the concept of “competencies” and showing how people must be at the heart of any organizational decision, Springer focuses on the essential qualities of leadership, the dynamics of teams, and the relationship between a team and the individuals that compose the team. He shows how an inclusive approach is essential to effective decision making. Using these insights, he then details the essential parts of the program management approach, describing the best way to define, organize, and schedule the work to be done, identifying risks and controlling costs during the whole process.   This is a uniquely insightful and practical text that will be invaluable reading for all professionals involved in the dynamic field of project and program management. Tested in a number of classes, the second edition includes numerous pedagogical improvements. New research on competency models is presented and more emphasis is placed on the importance for project managers of understanding the global context.      
How do you turn your dreams into reality? How do you make things happen for you, rather than let things happen to you? Don’t be humble about who you are and what you are capable of. Stand tall and stand out. Be known. Be recognized as a leader, and most of all, know you are a leader,” is Susan Bulkeley Butler's call to action for her readers to take responsibility for their lives.   In this updated second edition of the best-selling Become the CEO of You, Inc., Susan has provided strategies for improving your life and new techniques for advancing your career. The book is focused around her “Make it Happen” model, which is based on three decades of experience working with Fortune 500 companies. The steps include: Develop a clear aspiration for You, Inc.; build your board of directors; develop your plan to make your aspiration happen; and navigate your day-to-day journey.   The second edition is completely revised and includes new topics such as: The importance of executive coaching; developing your image in today’s world; taking a long-term view of your life and career; new opportunities for balancing career and family; use of social networking techniques . . . the good, bad and ugly; and preparing for promotion.
Advocates that the only elements that count in any enterprise are the quality of the leadership and the quality of the people, and that it is the task of the leaders to create the environment in which all people are energized to work together for the benefit of the enterprise and themselves.
The authors--academics and military men--cite examples throughout military history, including quotes, stories, and diagrams, that teach important lessons for business leaders. Their central theory is that an interacting environment sets typical conditions in which an organization and its strategy will succeed. Critical factors supporting this theory are explained in chapters covering the environment, organization, and strategy in the planning stage, and communication, action, and results in the execution phase. The appendix reviews military-business maxims, which include looking at the big picture first, looking for what causes change, being ready to deal with the worst, making sure the mission is clear, assigning objectives and not actions, and learning from everyone else. The final admonition is to learn why we make a mistake and how to avoid it next time. While the linkage of military and business performance is not a new concept, the authors' presentation in story form enhances traditional concepts to make them relevant and applicable to modern managers.
Paul Harris Stores did exactly what it was supposed to. It brought fashion, comfort, style, and functionality to millions of women in the Midwest. Paul Harris' run of 50 years is remarkable because so few retail stores make it that long and so few make it so big. His life and experiences tell readers much about U.S. culture, retail history, and a brand of entrepreneurship that appears to be making a comeback.
Throughout history, women have struggled to change the workplace, change government, change society. So what’s next? It’s time for women to change the world! Whether on the job, in politics, or in their community, there has never been a better time for women to make a difference in the world, contends author, mentor, and corporate pioneer Susan Bulkeley Butler in Women Count: A Guide to Changing the World.   Through her experience as the first female partner of a major consulting firm and founder of the Susan Bulkeley Butler Institute for the Development of Women Leaders, Butler’s unique insights have changed the lives of countless women. In Women Count, she shows readers how to change the world through a series of inspiring case studies that chronicle how she and other pioneering women in a range of fields have done so in years past. Women represent half of the country’s population, half of the country’s college graduates, and around 50 percent of the country’s workforce. Butler envisions a day when they will also make up their fair share of elected and appointed positions, including in corporate boardrooms.   Amid financial meltdowns, wars, and societal struggles, never before has the world so greatly needed the unique abilities of women to lead the way. But as history has shown, to make change, women must step into their power and become “women who count,” Butler contends. Then and only then, she argues, can women truly change the world.