Library and Information Sciences

Academic E-Books: Publishers, Librarians, and Users provides readers with a view of the changing and emerging roles of electronic books in higher education. The three main sections contain contributions by experts in the publisher/vendor arena, as well as by librarians who report on both the challenges of offering and managing e-books and on the issues surrounding patron use of e-books. The case study section offers perspectives from seven different sizes and types of libraries whose librarians describe innovative and thought-provoking projects involving e-books.   Read about perspectives on e-books from organizations as diverse as a commercial publisher and an association press. Learn about the viewpoint of a jobber. Find out about the e-book challenges facing librarians, such as the quest to control costs in the patron-driven acquisitions (PDA) model, how to solve the dilemma of resource sharing with e-books, and how to manage PDA in the consortial environment. See what patron use of e-books reveals about reading habits and disciplinary differences.   Finally, in the case study section, discover how to promote scholarly e-books, how to manage an e-reader checkout program, and how one library replaced most of its print collection with e-books. These and other examples illustrate how innovative librarians use e-books to enhance users’ experiences with scholarly works.  
Almost one hundred presentations from the 32nd annual Charleston Library Conference (held November 7-10, 2012) are included in this annual proceedings volume. Major themes of the meeting included alternative metrics for measuring impact, patron-driven acquisition, Open Access monographs, the future of university presses, and techniques for minimizing duplication and emphasizing the unique in library collections.   While the Charleston meeting remains a core one for acquisitions librarians in dialog with publishers and vendors, the breadth of coverage of this volume reflects the fact that this conference is now one of the major venues for leaders in the publishing and library communities to shape strategy and prepare for the future.   Almost 1,500 delegates attended the 2012 meeting, ranging from the staff of small public library systems to the CEOs of major corporations. This fully-indexed, copyedited volume provides a rich source for the latest evidence-based research and lessons from practice in a range of information science fields. The contributors are leaders in the library, publishing, and vendor communities.  
This book is a guide to the latest research using the C-SPAN Archives. In this book, nine authors present original work using the video archives to study presidential debates, public opinion and Congress, analysis of the Violence Against Women Act and the Great Lakes freshwater legislation, as well as President Clinton’s grand jury testimony. The C-SPAN Archives contain over 220,000 hours of first run digital video of the nation’s public affairs record. These and other essays serve as guides for scholars who want to explore the research potential of this robust public policy and communications resource.    
Plato's Republic was the inspiration for the theme of the 2009 Charleston Conference - Issues in Book and Serial Acquisition - Necessity is the Mother of Invention. The Conference, held November 4-7 in Charleston, SC, included ten preconferences, over 15 plenary sessions and over 120 concurrent sessions. The theme reflected the changes and innovations that are taking place in libraries, collection development and acquisitions as we expand our services in the global marketplace amid tough economic times of budget cuts, furloughs, and cancelation of some resources. We are looking for ideas and innovation. The Charleston Conference continues to be a major event for information exchange among librarians, vendors and publishers. Now in its twenty-nineth year the Conference continues to be one of the most popular conferences in the South East. Conference attendees continue to remark on the informative and thought-provoking sessions. The Conference provides a collegial atmosphere where librarians, publishers and vendors talk freely and directly about issues facing their libraries and information providers. All this interaction occurs in the wonderful city of Charleston, South Carolina. This is the fifth year that Beth R. Bernhardt has put together the proceedings from the Conference and the first year for Leah Hinds. We are pleased to share some of the learning experiences that we, and other attendees, had at the conference.
Held November 3-6, 2010, the theme of the 2010 Charleston Conference, the annual event that explores issues in book and serial acquisition, was “Anything Goes.” 2010 marked the thirtieth anniversary of the conference, and the theme revealed a sense of uncertainty about the future of librarianship in a digital environment marked by rapidly changing systems and practices. The conference focused on topics and themes in collection development, journals and serials management, technology and product development, collaboration between and among libraries and their communities, and managing e-book and monograph collections.   The Charleston Conference continues to be a major event for information exchange among librarians, vendors, and publishers. Conference attendees always remark on the informative, thought-provoking sessions and the collegial atmosphere where information professionals can talk directly about issues facing their industry. This volume shares the best of the presentations and panels.  
Copyright law is a critical issue for authors, librarians, publishers, and information vendors. It is also a complex area, with many shades of gray. Librarians continually need to seek answers to questions ranging from the reproduction of copyrighted works for library users, through the performance of audiovisual works, to the digitization and display of protected works on library websites. This book presents updated versions of the author’s copyright columns published in Against the Grain, the leading journal in acquisitions librarianship since the late 1990s. It is the first volume in the series Charleston Insights in Library, Archival, and Information Sciences. The aim of the Charleston Insights series is to focus on important topics in library and information science, presenting the issues in a relatively jargon-free way that is accessible to all types of information professionals, including librarians, publishers, and vendors, and this goal shapes the pragmatic and accessible tone of the book.   The volume is presented in question-and-answer format. The questions are real, submitted by librarians, educators, and other information professionals who have attended the author’s copyright law workshops and presentations or submitted them to her by e-mail or telephone. The author has selected the questions and answers that have general applicability. She has then arranged them into logical chapters, each prefaced by a short introduction to the topic. Because it is written in an accessible and clear style, readers may want to review the entire work or they can just access particular chapters or even specific questions as they need them. The volume includes an index to facilitate reference use.  
Given the increasing attention to managing, publishing, and preserving research datasets as scholarly assets, what competencies in working with research data will graduate students in STEM disciplines need to be successful in their fields? And what role can librarians play in helping students attain these competencies? In addressing these questions, this book articulates a new area of opportunity for librarians and other information professionals, developing educational programs that introduce graduate students to the knowledge and skills needed to work with research data. The term “data information literacy” has been adopted with the deliberate intent of tying two emerging roles for librarians together. By viewing information literacy and data services as complementary rather than separate activities, the contributors seek to leverage the progress made and the lessons learned in each service area. The intent of the publication is to help librarians cultivate strategies and approaches for developing data information literacy programs of their own using the work done in the multiyear, IMLS-supported Data Information Literacy (DIL) project as real-world case studies. The initial chapters introduce the concepts and ideas behind data information literacy, such as the twelve data competencies. The middle chapters describe five case studies in data information literacy conducted at different institutions (Cornell, Purdue, Minnesota, Oregon), each focused on a different disciplinary area in science and engineering. They detail the approaches taken, how the programs were implemented, and the assessment metrics used to evaluate their impact. The later chapters include the “DIL Toolkit,” a distillation of the lessons learned, which is presented as a handbook for librarians interested in developing their own DIL programs. The book concludes with recommendations for future directions and growth of data information literacy. More information about the DIL project can be found on the project’s website: datainfolit.org.  
Laying the Foundation: Digital Humanities in Academic Libraries examines the library’s role in the development, implementation, and instruction of successful digital humanities projects. It pays special attention to the critical role of librarians in building sustainable programs. It also examines how libraries can support the use of digital scholarship tools and techniques in undergraduate education.   Academic libraries are nexuses of research and technology; as such, they provide fertile ground for cultivating and curating digital scholarship. However, adding digital humanities to library service models requires a clear understanding of the resources and skills required. Integrating digital scholarship into existing models calls for a reimagining of the roles of libraries and librarians. In many cases, these reimagined roles call for expanded responsibilities, often in the areas of collaborative instruction and digital asset management, and in turn these expanded responsibilities can strain already stretched resources.   Laying the Foundation provides practical solutions to the challenges of successfully incorporating digital humanities programs into existing library services. Collectively, its authors argue that librarians are critical resources for teaching digital humanities to undergraduate students and that libraries are essential for publishing, preserving, and making accessible digital scholarship.  
The first edition of the Library Publishing Directory provides a snapshot of the publishing activities of 115 academic and research libraries, including information about the number and types of publications they produce, the services they offer authors, how they are staffed and funded, and the future plans of institutions that are engaged in this emerging field. In documenting the breadth and depth of activities in this field, this resource aims to articulate the unique value of library publishing; establish it as a significant and growing community of practice; and to raise its visibility within a number of stakeholder communities, including administrators, funding agencies, other scholarly publishers, librarians, and content creators. Specifically it is hoped that this Directory will: • Introduce all readers to the emerging field of library publishing and help articulate its unique characteristics as a distinctive "publishing field." • Facilitate collaboration among library publishers and other publishing entities, especially the university presses and learned societies that share their values. • Alert authors of scholarly content to a range of potential publishing partners dedicated to supporting their experimentation with new forms of scholarly communication and open access business models. The Directory is also available Open Access in several electronic formats through www.librarypublishing.org
The third edition of the Library Publishing Directory provides a snapshot of the publishing activities of over 100 academic and research libraries, including information about the number and types of publications they produce, the services they offer authors, how they are staffed and funded, and their future plans. In documenting the breadth and depth of activities in this field, this resource aims to articulate the unique value of library publishing; to establish it as a significant and growing community of practice; and to raise its visibility within a number of stakeholder communities, including administrators, funding agencies, other scholarly publishers, librarians, and content creators.     Specifically, this Directory:   • Introduces readers to the growing field of library publishing and helps articulate its unique characteristics as a distinctive publishing field. • Facilitates collaboration among library publishers and other publishing entities, especially the university presses and learned societies that share their values. • Alerts authors of scholarly content to a range of potential publishing partners dedicated to supporting their experimentation with new forms of scholarly communication and open access business models. • Enables benchmarking and identification of trends in the field. The Directory is also available Open Access in several electronic formats through www.librarypublishing.org.  
Quickly following what many expected to be a wholesale revolution in library practices, institutional repositories encountered unforeseen problems and a surprising lack of impact. Clunky or cumbersome interfaces, lack of perceived value and use by scholars, fear of copyright infringement, and the like tended to dampen excitement and adoption.   This collection of essays, arranged in five thematic sections, is intended to take the pulse of institutional repositories—to see how they have matured and what can be expected from them, as well as introduce what may be the future role of the institutional repository.   Making Institutional Repositories Work takes novices as well as seasoned practitioners through the practical and conceptual steps necessary to develop a functioning institutional repository, customized to the needs and culture of the home institution. The first section covers all aspects of system platforms, including hosted and open-source options, big data capabilities and integration, and issues related to discoverability. The second section addresses policy issues, from the basics to open-source and deposit mandates. The third section focuses on recruiting and even creating content. Authors in this section will address the ways that different disciplines tend to have different motivations for deposit, as well as the various ways that institutional repositories can serve as publishing platforms. The fourth section covers assessment and success measures for all involved—librarians, deans, and administrators. The theory and practice of traditional metrics, alt metrics, and peer review receive chapter-length treatment. The fifth section provides case studies that include a boots-on-the-ground perspective of issues raised in the first four sections. By noting trends and potentialities, this final section, authored by Executive Director of SPARC Heather Joseph, makes future predictions and helps managers position institutional repositories to be responsive to change and even shape the evolution of scholarly communication.  
Reference service, the idea that librarians provide direct assistance to users, has been a central function of libraries for over a century. Today’s libraries are even more complex and intimidating to new users than libraries of the past, and the technical and social contexts in which users experience their library’s resources add to this complexity. The availability of a friendly librarian who helps users find materials, search for information on a topic, interpret citations, identify quality information, and format bibliographies has become a standard component of what libraries do. However, changes in technologies, economics, and user populations are causing many libraries to question the need and function of traditional reference services.   This book examines how library services meet user needs in the twenty-first century. Many libraries are asking key questions about reference services, such as: Should librarians be on call waiting for users or out in the community promoting the library? Should we assign staff to help users one-on-one or is it more effective to assign them to build and use tools to teach users how to find and evaluate information? Will we continue to purchase commercial reference sources or just use Wikipedia and other free resources on the web? With the proliferation of information available today, how can we help users evaluate search results and select the best resources that they can find? And how do we evaluate the effectiveness of reference services?   Through contributions from the leading scholars and practitioners in the field, this volume addresses such issues and how they affect practices in public and academic libraries. In addition, it presents perspectives from the publishing community and the creators of discovery tools. Each section is enhanced by short case studies that highlight real-world practices and experiences.   Foreword: Joseph Janes, University of Washington  Introduction (David A. Tyckoson, California State University, Fresno, and John G. Dove, Credo Reference)  Part I: Skills and Services  Ch. 1: Participatory Approaches to Building Community-Centered Libraries (Anastasia Diamond-Ortiz, Cleveland Public Library, and Buffy J. Hamilton (Norcross High School Media Center) Ch. 2: Guiding Learners: Information Literacy (Alesia McManus, Howard Community College, Maryland) Ch. 3: The Reference Interview Revisited (M. Kathleen Kern, University of Illinois) Ch. 4: Readers’ Advisory Services as Reference Services (Jessica E. Moyer, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) Part II: Content and Information Sources Ch. 5: Reference Publishing in the 21st Century (Rolf A. Janke, Mission Bell Media) Ch. 6: Wikipedia, User-generated Content, and the Future of Reference Sources (Phoebe Ayers, Wikimedia Foundation and University of California, Davis) Part III: Tools and Technologies Ch. 7: Discovery Tools (Michael Courtney, Indiana University) Ch. 8: Collaborative Virtual Reference (Kris Johnson, AskColorado) Ch. 9: The Value of Reference Services (Amanda Clay Powers, Mississippi State University) Where Do We Go from Here? (David A. Tyckoson and John G. Dove)   A set of 23 studies illustrate many of the topics discussed with practical examples. Topics include: Personal Librarians (Martha Adkins, University of San Diego); Roving Reference (Madeline Cohen and Kevin Saw, Lehman College, CUNY); Twitter Reference Services (Amanda L. Folk, University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg); Community Outreach Through LibGuides (Mandi Goodsett, Georgia Southwestern State University, and Kirstin Dougan, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign); Integration of Library Resources Into the Course Management System (Janet Pinkley, California State University, Channel Islands, and Margaret Driscoll, University of California, Santa Barbara); Reference Services to Patrons With Disabilities (Michael Saar, Lamar University, Texas); Library Staff and Faculty Perceptions of Reference Service Change (Mara H. Sansolo, Pasco-Hernando State College, and Kaya van Beynen, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg); On-Call Reference Services (Krista Schmidt, Western Carolina University); Peer Reference Tutoring (Michelle Twait, Gustavus Adolphus College); Single Service Point Reference Services (Diane Hunter and Mary E. Anderson, University of Missouri-Kansas City); Embedding Reference Services in a Learning Management System (Jolanda-Pieta van Arnhem and James Williams, College of Charleston); Analyzing Usage Logs to Optimize Search Results (Christine Stohn, Ex Libris); Educating Reference Librarians for First-Day Success (Elizabeth Mahoney and Christinger Tomer, University of Pittsburgh); Reference: An Architect’s View (Rayford W. Law, Rayford Law Architecture+Planning); Discovery and the Digital Reference Desk (Andrew Nagy, ProQuest); OCLC and Discovery (John McCullough, OCLC); Discovery Services at OhioLINK (Ron Burns, EBSCO, and Theda Schwing, OhioLINK); A Solution for Teaching Reference Sources (Denise Beaubien Bennett, University of Florida); Crowdsourcing Reference and Library Help (Ilana Stonebraker and Tao Zhang, Purdue University); Embedding LibraryThing for Libraries in the Online Library Catalog (Amanda Viana, Norton Public Library, Massachusetts); Serving the Somewhere Out There Patron (Nicolette Sosulski, Portage District Library, Michigan); 24/7 Global Virtual Reference Cooperation (Susan McGlamery, OCLC QuestionPoint); and Boosting User Engagement With Online Social Tools (Georgina Parsons, Brunel University London, United Kingdom).
It has become increasingly accepted that important digital data must be retained and shared in order to preserve and promote knowledge, advance research in and across all disciplines of scholarly endeavor, and maximize the return on investment of public funds.   To meet this challenge, colleges and universities are adding data services to existing infrastructures by drawing on the expertise of information professionals who are already involved in the acquisition, management and preservation of data in their daily jobs. Data services include planning and implementing good data management practices, thereby increasing researchers’ ability to compete for grant funding and ensuring that data collections with continuing value are preserved for reuse.   This volume provides a framework to guide information professionals in academic libraries, presses, and data centers through the process of managing research data from the planning stages through the life of a grant project and beyond. It illustrates principles of good practice with use-case examples and illuminates promising data service models through case studies of innovative, successful projects and collaborations.   Table of Contents   Introduction to Research Data Management, Joyce M. Ray PART 1: UNDERSTANDING THE POLICY CONTEXT The Policy and Institutional Framework, James L. Mullins Data Governance: Where Technology and Policy Collide, MacKenzie Smith PART 2: PLANNING FOR DATA MANAGEMENT The Use of Life Cycle Models in Developing and Supporting Data Services, Jake Carlson Data Management Assessment and Planning Tools, Andrew Sallans and Sherry Lake Trustworthy Data Repositories: The Value and Benefits of Auditing and Certification, Bernard F. Reilly, Jr., and Marie E. Waltz PART 3: MANAGING PROJECT DATA Copyright, Open Data, and the Availability-Usability Gap: Challenges, Opportunities, and Approaches for Libraries, Melissa Levine Metadata Services, Jenn Riley Data Citation: Principles and Practice, Jan Brase, Yvonne Socha, Sarah Callaghan, Christine L. Borgman, Paul F. Uhlir, and Bonnie Carroll PART 4: ARCHIVING AND MANAGING RESEARCH DATA IN REPOSITORIES Assimilating Digital Repositories Into the Active Research Process,Tyler Walters Partnering to Curate and Archive Social Science Data, Jared Lyle, George Alter, and Ann Green Managing and Archiving Research Data:Local Repository and Cloud-Based Practices, Michele Kimpton and Carol Minton Morris Chronopolis Repository Services, David Minor, Brian E. C. Schottlaender, and Ardys Kozbial PART 5: MEASURING SUCCESS Evaluating a Complex Project: DataONE, Suzie Allard What to Measure? Toward Metrics for Research Data Management, Angus Whyte, Laura Molloy, Neil Beagrie, and John Houghton PART 6: BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER: CASE STUDIES An Institutional Perspective on Data Curation Services: A View from Cornell University,Gail Steinhart Purdue University Research Repository: Collaborations in Data Management, D. Scott Brandt Data Curation for the Humanities: Perspectives From Rice University, Geneva Henry Developing Data Management Services for Researchers at the University of Oregon, Brian Westra CLOSING REFLECTIONS: LOOKING AHEAD The Next Generation of Challenges in the Curation of Scholarly Data, Clifford Lynch About the Contributors Index   Praise for Research Data Management   “Joyce Ray has brought together an impressive group of library thinkers and data management experts to cover all aspects of research data management now and into the future. This book covers the entire data life cycle—from incentives and mandates for sharing research data, to metadata standards and best practices of describing data for discovery, to preservation and archiving of datasets for use by future generations. Information professionals in the library and archival communities are a natural fit to lead the myriad tasks of research data management, and they will find inspiration in the insights provided in each chapter.” Carol Tenopir. Chancellor’s Professor and Board of Visitors Professor, School of Information Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville     "Increasing funder requirements relating to research data, combined with a growing awareness of the value that accessible, citable, reusable data can offer to researchers, mean that every research organisation needs to take research data management seriously as an institutional imperative. This timely book contains contributions on every aspect of the problem from people with practical experience of the solutions. The editor, Joyce Ray, has been closely involved with the community's developing understanding of the challenges for many years; she has drawn together essential guidance and useful case studies that will be of value to all university information and research services." Kevin Ashley, Director, Digital Curation Centre, University of Edinburgh     “Research data management is becoming a crucial issue for European universities as they tackle the challenges posed by data-driven science. The League of European Research Universities (LERU) is about to publish its ‘Roadmap for Research Data,’ which will guide universities in their decision making as they tackle the data deluge. This book, therefore, is timely and will provide well-documented guidance on the contributions that the library sector can make. Data-driven research has the potential to revolutionize the way research is conducted, and there is a tremendously important role for libraries to play.” Paul Ayris, Director of UCL Library Services and UCL Copyright Officer, President of LIBER (Association of European Research Libraries), Chair of the LERU Chief Information Officers Community     “The variety of approaches and experiences give this book broad appeal for information professionals at different size organizations with different priorities. The details of the process that organizations went through to try and meet data services needs is extremely helpful. This manuscript gets down to the nuts and bolts, and the case studies are its greatest feature.” Stephanie Wright, Data Services Coordinator, University of Washington Libraries     “As a research library-based data management specialist, I have struggled to find robust resources with up-to-date practical information without having to scour the Internet for hours. This book will be a major asset to all professionals who are in a similar position. It is important because it provides relevant, timely, practical information about topics that I deal with every day—repositories, governance, copyright, metadata, data citation, and so forth—and it’s all collected in one place. In a more philosophical sense, the book may provide a vehicle for getting everyone in the data services field ‘on the same page’ with regard to the latest and greatest in research data management, in the sense that the book provides a benchmark for the state of our profession. We all recognize that data services are new to libraries, and many of us are doing a bit of DIY in terms of developing our services. The result of the ‘pull yourself up by your bootstraps’ approach is that services vary wildly across institutions. The availability of a book like this enables librarians (and other data stewardship professionals) everywhere to seek out a common reference, which fosters dialog and consistency of approach.” Amanda L. Whitmire, Data Management Specialist, Center for Digital Scholarship and Services, Oregon State University Libraries and Press     “This collection of timely articles on the emerging field of librarian support for research data management includes a good selection of topics and well-chosen authors. As a practitioner, I found the case study articles the most useful and interesting parts of the book. They were meaty, blow-by-blow accounts of how an organization, like mine, struggled and succeeded with these uncertain challenges of data management. This is not just a collection of articles written by key players from major grant-funded groups, but also real librarians implementing real services that you can relate to, and best of all, implement yourself.” Lisa Johnston, Research Services Librarian, Co-Director of the University Digital Conservancy, University of Minnesota Libraries     "This book represents a foundational contribution from the guardians of institutional data that will give confidence to those who appreciate the huge potential of data based research in seeking solutions to global and societal challenges in the future." John Wood, Secretary-General, Association of Commonwealth Universities and European Chair of the Research Data Alliance     “Research data will drive the next generation of innovation, and the deployment of effective data infrastructure is essential to enable data access and use. The topics in this book are both important and timely, and the contributors and editor read like a Who’s Who of key players in the field.” Francine Berman, Chair of Research Data Alliance/US and Co-Chair of the National Academies Board on Research Data and Information     “A hallmark of every emergent profession is the initial codification of the knowledge that distinguishes it as a specialization. Research Data Management serves this function for the cluster of professionals coalescing to support data-intensive science, also known as e-science or cyberinfrastructure. The diverse talents of the contributors to this work reflect the rich intellectual roots undergirding this new data profession. Future generations of data curators, data scientists, data librarians, data managers, and other data specialists will look upon this volume as a seminal work.” Charles Humphrey, Research Data Services Coordinator, University of Alberta Libraries 
The current publishing environment has experienced a drastic change in the way content is created, delivered, and acquired, particularly for libraries. With the increasing importance of digital publishing, more than half the titles published in the United States are self-published. With this growth in self-published materials, librarians, publishers, and vendors have been forced to rethink channels of production, distribution, and access as it applies to the new content. Self-Publishing and Collection Development: Opportunities and Challenges for Libraries will address multiple aspects of how public and academic libraries can deal with the increase in self-published titles.   While both academic and public libraries have started to grapple with the burgeoning issues associated with self-published books, many difficulties remain. To develop effective policies and procedures, stakeholders must now tackle questions associated with the transformation of the publishing landscape. Obstacles to self-publishing include the lack of reviews, the absence of cataloging and bibliographic control, proprietary formats for e-books, and the difficulty for vendors in providing these works.   General chapters will include information on reviewing sources, cataloging and bibliographic control, and vendor issues. Information addressing public libraries issues will highlight initiatives to make self-published materials available at the Los Gatos Public Library in California and the Kent District Library in Michigan. Chapters on academic library issues will address why self-published materials are important for academic institutions, especially those with comprehensive collecting interests. Several self-published authors focus on how they attempt to make their works more suitable for public libraries. Finally, the book concludes with a bibliographic essay on self-publishing   As the term “traditional publishing” begins to fade and new content producers join the conversation, librarians, publishers, and vendors will play an important role in facilitating and managing the shift.  
The theme of the 2011 Charleston Conference, the annual event that explores issues in book and serial acquisition, was “Something’s Gotta Give.” The conference, held November 2–5, 2011, in Charleston, SC, included 9 pre-meetings, more than 10 plenaries, and over 120 concurrent sessions. The theme reflected the increasing sense of strain felt by both libraries and publishers as troubling economic trends and rapid technological change challenge the information supply chain. What part of the system will buckle under this pressure? Who will be the winners and who will be the losers in this stressful environment?   The Charleston Conference continues to be a major event for information exchange among librarians, vendors, and publishers. As it begins its fourth decade, the Conference is one of the most popular international meetings for information professionals, with almost 1,500 delegates. Conference attendees continue to remark on the informative and thought-provoking sessions. The Conference provides a collegial atmosphere where librarians, vendors, and publishers talk freely and directly about issues facing libraries and information providers. In this volume, the organizers of the meeting are pleased to share some of the learning experiences that they—and other attendees—had at the conference.
Over one hundred presentations from the thirty-fourth Charleston Library Conference (held November 5–8, 2014) are included in this annual proceedings volume. Major themes of the meeting included patron-driven acquisitions versus librarian-driven acquisitions; marketing library resources to faculty and students to increase use; measuring and demonstrating the library's role and impact in the retention of students and faculty; the desirability of textbook purchasing by the library; changes in workflows necessitated by the move to virtual collections; the importance of self-publishing and open access publishing as a collection strategy; the hybrid publisher and the hybrid author; the library’s role in the collection of data, datasets, and data curation; and data-driven decision making. While the Charleston meeting remains a core one for acquisitions, serials, and collection development librarians in dialog with publishers and vendors, the breadth of coverage of this volume reflects the fact that the Charleston Conference is now one of the major venues for leaders in the information community to shape strategy and prepare for the future.   Over 1,600 delegates attended the 2014 meeting, ranging from the staff of small public library systems to CEOs of major corporations. This fully indexed, copyedited volume provides a rich source for the latest evidence-based research and lessons from practice in a range of information science fields. The contributors are leaders in the library, publishing, and vendor communities.  
C-SPAN is the network of record for US political affairs, broadcasting live gavel-to-gavel proceedings of the House of Representatives and the Senate, and to other forums where public policy is discussed, debated, and decided––without editing, commentary, or analysis and with a balanced presentation of points of view. The C-SPAN Archives, located adjacent to Purdue University, is the home of the online C-SPAN Video Library. The Archives has copied all of C-SPAN's television content since 1987. Extensive indexing, captioning, and other enhanced online features provide researchers, policy analysts, students, teachers, and public officials with an unparalleled chronological and internally cross-referenced record for deeper study. The Year in C-SPAN Archives Research presents the finest interdisciplinary research utilizing tools of the C-SPAN Video Library. Each volume highlights recent scholarship and comprises leading experts and emerging voices in political science, journalism, psychology, computer science, communication, and a variety of other disciplines. Each section within each volume includes responses from expert discussants. Developed in partnership with the Brian Lamb School of Communication and with support from the C-SPAN Education Foundation, C-SPAN Insights is guided by the ideal that all experimental outcomes, including those from our American experiment, can be best improved by directed study driving richer engagement and better understanding. The Year in C-SPAN Archives Research—Volume 4, edited by Robert X. Browning, advances our understanding of the framing of mental health, HIV/AIDS, policing, and public health, and explores subjects such as audience reactions in C-SPAN covered debates, the Twitter presidency of Donald Trump, and collaborative learning using the C-SPAN Video Library.  
Almost one hundred presentations from the thirty-third annual Charleston Library Conference (held November 6–9, 2013) are included in this annual proceedings volume. Major themes of the meeting included open access publishing, demand-driven acquisition, the future of university presses, and data-driven decision making. While the Charleston meeting remains a core one for acquisitions librarians in dialog with publishers and vendors, the breadth of coverage of this volume reflects the fact that this conference is now one of the major venues for leaders in the publishing and library communities to shape strategy and prepare for the future. At least 1,500 delegates attended the 2013 meeting, ranging from the staff of small public library systems to the CEOs of major corporations. This fully indexed, copyedited volume provides a rich source for the latest evidence-based research and lessons from practice in a range of information science fields. The contributors are leaders in the library, publishing, and vendor communities.