Nursing and Dementia Care

Afternoons with Puppy is a heartwarming account of dynamic relationships and outcomes involving a therapist, his therapy animals, and his patients over the course of almost two decades. It is a narrative of Dr. Fine's experiences and the growing respect for the power of the animals effect on his patients and himself.
This volume is a collection of chapters all contributed by individuals who have presented their ideas at conferences and who take moderate stands with the use of animals in research. Specifically the chapters bear of the issues of: notions of the moral standings of animals, history of the methods of argumentation, knowledge of the animal mind, nature and value of regulatory structures, how respect for animals can be converted from theory to action in the laboratory. The chapters have been tempered by open discussion with individuals with different opinions and not audiences of true believers. It is the hope of all, that careful consideration of the positions in these chapters will leave reader with a deepened understanding--not necessarily a hardened position.
The professional communities of psychologists and child welfare specialists to a deeper, higher and more encompassing awareness and understanding of the crucial linking of caring for animals and children in human experience. The combination of careful research, documentation, and compelling narrative accounts are blended into a rich resource to help professionals and concerned citizens and parents understand how the ethics of caring are not bounded by species. Educators, clergy, coaches, law enforcement, and mental health workers, parents, students of developmental science.
The beloved best seller has been revised and expanded for the fifth edition. Jolene Brackey has a vision: that we will soon look beyond the challenges of Alzheimer's disease to focus more of our energies on creating moments of joy. When people have short-term memory loss, their lives are made up of moments. We are not able to create perfectly wonderful days for people with dementia or Alzheimer’s, but we can create perfectly wonderful moments, moments that put a smile on their faces and a twinkle in their eyes. Five minutes later, they will not remember what we did or said, but the feeling that we left them with will linger. The new edition of Creating Moments of Joy is filled with more practical advice sprinkled with hope, encouragement, new stories, and generous helpings of humor. In this volume, Brackey reveals that our greatest teacher is having cared for and loved someone with Alzheimer’s and that often what we have most to learn about is ourselves.   
With a sense of urgency, Dr. Tyler has collected and transcribed some 750 folk remedies still alive in the memories of more than 175 Hoosier-area correspondents. The pharmacologist, who has thirty years experience with natural-product remedies, fears these cures will soon be forgotten, since modern medicine usually writes them off as hoax, and those who practice them are becoming fewer and fewer. By suggesting further investigation of some remedies, warning readers against downright dangerous "cures," and noting the constitutive ingredients of those proven effective, Tyler invites further illumination of this shady region between superstition and science while entertaining his reader with much fascinating medical tore. Hoosiers, folklore followers, physicians, and pharmacologists will appreciate the meticulous clarity of Tyler's scientific commentary on folk medicines.
The storyteller has a fascinating place in our world. Storyteller Sidney Homan tells tales of growing up in Philadelphia in the 1940s and 50s accounts of Bruzzy the Bully; of John Crapp, the television salesman; of Leslie Doober and his rotten banana; of drunken Uncle Eddie, and of the Queen of the mushrooms. Sometimes comic, sometimes bittersweet, A Fish in the Moonlight illuminates the growth of both storyteller and listener.
Holding a dead baby. Standing up to a supervisor. Washing a bedridden patient's hair. Talking past and through one another in a case conference. Smoothing a sheet over a patient's disintegrating body. Firing a longtime friend and co-worker. Literature can be a rich source of guidance to help with contemporary ethical dilemmas facing health care professionals and patients. Poems and stories can help to identify moral problems, promote empathy, and tolerate ambiguity in health and illness. The depth and detail within stories and poems allow readers to experience the contradictory feelings, complex relationships, and situational messiness that characterize ethical quandaries in actual practice. These works by women in health care contribute to our understanding by introducing characters who struggle with illness and aging or who try to make sense of their own feelings in the face of pain and mortality. Who better to capture the essence of this complexity than people working directly within it?
This book gathers, in one place, those measures presently used to study the human-companion animal bond. The measures chosen for inclusion are the most heavily used by researchers, as well as measures that appear to be innovative or relate to the different aspects of the human-companion animal relationship. The measures cover the human-animal bond principally by attachment, but also by fear, abuse, or neglect.
At Wit's End is a simple, straightforward, and easy-to-read summary about Alzheimer's as a disease and condition, written without technical jargon and impractical detail. About 33% of the population will eventually provide care for someone with Alzheimer's. The strain to maintain the medical well-being and mental health stability of a loved one with Alzheimer's can be enormous. Still, providing care, enhancing the value of living, can be amply rewarding. Many books delve into other areas of Alzheimer's emphasizing the financial, legal, and treatment needs of the afflicted. At Wit's End is unique since it not only explains the psychiatric and psychological aspects of Alzheimer's but helps family members or caregivers discover a wealth of effective interventions. Kraus focuses on the whole person and his/her social, psychological, physical, and spiritual life.Find out"How Alzheimer's can be distinguished from normal aging and other diseases that mimic its symptoms;"How the disorder affects changes in functional abilities how an Alzheimer's daily competence is viewed by psychiatric and legal communities;"How rational think is distorted leading to a wide array of behaviors like agitation, impatience, wandering, and inappropriate expressions of sexuality;"What medical treatments are available, both traditional and alternative. At Wit's End gives families and caregivers a new outlook on Alzheimer's.
Pets play a greater role in our emotional and physical health than ever before, says the Purdue University professor who is co-author of his revised edition of Between Pets and People: The Importance of Animal Companionship. The book by Alan M. Beck of Purdue's School of Veterinary Medicine and Aaron H. Katcher, psychiatrist and professor emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania, explores the emotional and physical benefits of owning a pet and analyzes the complex relationship between people and pets. "The study of the importance of the relationship between people and animals is a growing field and has the potential to be part of the whole human-health field," says Beck, director of Purdue's Center for Applied Ethology and Human-Animal Interaction. "The social milieu on where animals fit into society has really changed in the last 13 years. We've gone from recognizing the potential of animals being a significant positive contribution to certain populations, such as the elderly, to actual documentation." Beck and Katcher note a 1992 study by an Australian cardiologist of 5,000 people who visited a clinic to find ways to reduce heart disease. The study found that people with pets had lower blood pressure and lower blood fat levels than those without pets, even though the two groups were alike in diet and exercise. The authors also point to the trend by nursing homes to incorporate animals into the routine and environment for patients. For example, in the early 1980s nursing homes typically did not allow pets to visit patients, while today nearly half of the homes have an organized program for animal therapy, Beck says. In addition to exploring physical benefits, the book covers such topics as pets as family members, pets as therapists, talking to pets, and how pets can teach us to become better companions to friends and family. The book also has a list of Web sites by such organizations as Canine Companions for Independence and the American Kennel Club. While pets provide health benefits, they can create problems, Beck and Katcher say. "There is no medicine that doesn't have some side effects," Beck says. For example, more pet ownership has public-health implications such as more dog bites, he notes. And some people whose pets die grieve to the point of illness, he says. But grief over the loss of an animal is not new, Beck says. Ancient Egyptians shaved their eyebrows after their cats died, and the Roman emperor Caligula had his horse entombed.
What happens behind the doors of the animal shelter? This book will introduce the reader to the work culture of animal shelter employees, volunteers, activists, educators, and pets. By weaving together her own personal memoirs with interviews with workers, the author describes the traditions, philosophies, history, and current social dynamics of a typical animal welfare community. She examines how the daily interactions, personal philosophies, disparate methods, technology, and life experiences of the humans and pets influence the care of homeless animals, often playing an intricate role in the life or death situation each pet eventually faces.The author also describes her own experience with a "rescued" dog, touching upon the issues of victimization and redemption that she finds characterize the animal welfare field. The animals in the book are presented as active participants in this daily drama, able to communicate their needs to their caretakers and form lasting impressions. Throughout the book, workers, volunteers, and activists tell their own stories-stories that embody the hopes, frustrations, successes, and failures in bridging the bond between homeless pets and new families.
This inquiry into matters of heart, conducted under the shadows of pending surgery, awakens themes of boyhood, education, and marriage and prompt questions about loyalty to a deceased father, connections with immigrant grandparents, loss and rediscovery of faith, and solitude versus community. A medical narrative, the book also chronicles a span of contemporary American life. Throughout Amato's account, the consistent reminder of his upcoming bypass invites readers to reflect on their own lives and selves. This is an intelligent and witty guide to an immensely common operation that nevertheless for each patient constitutes a unique experience-a veritable rite of passage.
Articles by an array of international experts provide as an excellent resource for professionals and students involved in the area of disability studies. The book is divided into three parts - (1) disability and modern society; (2) working with people who are challenged; and (3) working within a disability-services environment. This approach mirrors the contemporary debate within a practice framework reflecting how individuals, organizations, and communities deal with the problem and solutions.At the beginning of each chapter, learning objectives are set out to aid the reader in dealing with the text and activities contained inside the chapter. The materials across the chapters are developed so that when finished, the reader will become more skilled in the area of modern community disability services. This integrated approach provides the key elements needed for both training and advancing knowledge in this fast growing area.
A Complete Guide to Alzheimer's's--Proofing Your Home is a comprehensive practical guide for helping in-home caregivers and health professionals who advise them, to evaluate the home environment and make modifications enhancing safety and function. Easy to read, the book offers the reader numerous new ideas on every page, each with the potential solve some small yet vexing problem. The book begins with an overview of how to evaluate the rooms and exterior areas of a typical home and how to formulate a plan that facilitates maximum function for both the care-recipient and caregiver.A strength of the book is the second chapter. It provides a disease overview focusing on symptom presentation and how it affects day to day function. This is particularly helpful for the caregiver as it explains how a symptom/behavior is represented in their home. Quotes familiar to professionals working with families help caregivers to recognize how this relates to their own situation. These quotes help to give the book focus and direction, but more important, the quotes provide a very empathetic and "human" touch and make the book highly readable. I find this approach much more salient than "academic approaches" to the description of dementia.Another strength is the glossary of terms, which is comprehensive and simple to understand. It can help the caregiver speak with health care professionals or understand recommendations - a problem even when the professional speaks in the simplest possible terms. A last strength is the recommendation of products designed for people with AD or for other purposes, but work well for people with AD. The authors have included a shopping guide for convenience of the reader. While this will need to be updated every few years, it is an invaluable resource.A Complete Guide to Alzheimer's-Proofing Your Home is a well-written thoughtful collection of ideas for home-based caregivers. The one drawback to the book is that it reinforces how terribly complex caring for people with dementia can be. The comprehensive table of contents can help caregivers sort out what they need to examine for each problem. This is a new approach to AD care and should, in my opinion, be an invaluable addition to the "Alzheimer's professional's"
This volume illustrates the diversity of ongoing research in the field of veterinary behavioral medicine and includes the current findings of scientists, veterinarians and practitioners. The materials included provide new additions to the growing knowledge base, refine or confirm current opinions, provide avenues for further research, and increase the appreciation and understanding of the different approaches used internationally within the discipline.
Anne Bashkiroff was a pioneer in the fight for Alzheimer’s awareness. Her dear husband, Sasha, suffered for nine years with this terrible brain- and soul-damaging illness. Anne was faced with unanswered questions, economic heartaches, and lonely nights of suffering. The consequences of Alzheimer's and the extended burden the disease places on families and caregivers was not fully known in the 1970s. Instead of giving up, Bashkiroff moved to make the world aware of the silent disease. Her strength and dedication led her to help establish the Family Survival Project. In 1997, she testified before First Lady Rosalynn Carter about the needs of caregivers. Bashkiroff turned her inward suffering to outward hope.
In The Golden Bridge, Patty Dobbs Gross provides both personal and professional advice on how specially bred and trained dogs help to facilitate communication for children with autism and other developmental disabilities. This important information compendium is a guide for parents dealing with the social, emotional, and educational issues of raising children with challenges. Myths and labels concerning autism are explored, examined, and redefined. While focused on children, the advice that Gross shares will be immensely helpful for anyone involved in breeding, raising, and training dogs to mitigate any type of disability at any age.The Golden Bridge provides advice about living with autism, animal-assisted therapy and autism, training an assistance dog to work with a child with autism or a developmental disability, and using an assistance dog to deal with a child's grief. This impressive volume also contains a vast list of resources, including web sites, for follow-up information, a section on books about autism, and a directory of assistance dog providers.
Illness in the Academy investigates the deep-seated, widespread belief among academics and medical professionals that lived experiences outside the workplace should not be sacrificed to the ideal of objectivity those academic and medical professions so highly value. The 47 selections in this collection illuminate how academics bring their intellectual and creative tools, skills, and perspectives to bear on experiences of illness. The selections cross genres as well as bridge disciplines and cultures.
Each year there are an estimated 125,000 people with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia who leave the safety of their homes and families, unable to find their way back. Because families may find it difficult to believe anything so terrible could happen to them, they often do not prepare for it. Wandering is the skeleton in the Alzheimer's closet, the lurking danger and topic that is never discussed- until it is too late. In workbook form, In Search of the Alzheimer's Wanderer outlines steps that families can take to find their loved ones if they are one day discovered missing. This book is an invaluable tool providing answers that could save lives
Just Love Me reveals the thoughts and emotions of a woman struggling with a suddenly unmanageable life; numerous hospitalizations, suicide attempts, everyday turmoil, and finally, the arduous search for an accurate diagnosis of the illness responsible for it all: Alzheimer's disease (AD).This account is unique in that most books on the subject of Alzheimer's are written by a carepartner or medical professional. There are very few books actually written by a person living with the disease, and Just Love Me should be required reading for anyone who has any contact with a person afflicted with AD. This book is especially helpful for anyone related by birth, marriage, friendship, or those people who have a professional relationship with Alzheimer's sufferers.Jeanne Lee's very personal, frank description of her life experiences before, approaching, and during the early stages of AD enables readers to better understand the disease from the inside out; a view not often seen by non-sufferers. By getting inside the mind of the author and experiencing with her the worries and frustrations that constantly torment her, the symptoms of AD become less enigmatic for the reader.
Dogs know when we are feeling down. They love it when we are happy and seeking friendship and fun, and they understand when we are feeling sad and desperate. This book presents a series of real-life tales of the positive effects dogs have had on people at the end of their lives, chronicling the visits by two therapy dogs, Woody and Katie, to patients in a south Florida hospice facility. Through twenty-one stories, infused with humor amidst the sadness, Michelle Rivera, an experienced animal therapist, explores the many ways in which animals can ease human suffering. Her book begins with the deeply personal story of her own mother Katherine’s illness and dying appeal to have the company of a dog, and proceeds to tell the stories of patients young and old who the author was inspired to visit with her “hospice hounds.” As well as demonstrating many of the techniques of animal therapy, Rivera argues powerfully that not allowing pets in health care facilities is a counterproductive policy that deprives patients of comfort at the time they need it most. Some of the stories were previously published in Hospice Hounds (2001), but the author has substantially expanded her introduction and added an invaluable final section that gives practical tips on training and certifying your dog to be a therapy animal.
Whether you're hiking with your canine friend in a remote area or work with a dog on a search-and-rescue team or police force, you need to be prepared for emergencies when veterinary service is not available. Rescuing Rover: A First Aid and Disaster Guide for Dog Owners provides dog owners, handlers, and emergency physicians with an understandable guide for safe treatment until the dog can be transported to a veterinarian. Although a number of books describe some techniques for the emergency care of dogs, there is no single illustrated summary that is as practical. With its concise, easy-to-read instructions, detailed and beautifully rendered illustrations, and convenient format, this book covers such common medical procedures as bandaging an ear and constructing a makeshift muzzle. Written in consultation with canine handlers from FEMA, staff from the AAVDM and the Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine, it can also be used as a practical learning guide for veterinary medical and technical students.
choices were right, what choices were wrong, and how can she now help those whose journey is just beginning. She clearly and wisely explains that in Alzheimer's there are no "right" ways, no "best" decisions, no "perfect" answers. The Return Journey is the result of Sue's personal journals during her mother's 8-year illness and her correspondence with other caregivers kind enough to share their innermost feelings and emotions. Their stories provide the reader with an insider's view - lessons to be learned from looking through the personal peephole of family members at the heart of the experience itself.
Ellison put her career in research biochemistry on hold in order to raise two daughters. After 10 years, she wanted to work again but was too out of touch with technology and too attached to her rural home to go back to biochemistry. What to do? She turned her hobby of spinning into a business: sheepherding. These are her memories, advice, and lessons learned from the first seven years of the business, and they're delightful. Ellison's chapters flow sensitively--sometimes exuding a mother's common sense, sometimes McMurtryesque pathos, sometimes gently pointed Bombeckish humor. Undoubtedly this is a great acquisition for rural area libraries, but it's more than a farmer's account. This is inspiration for all women who may be contemplating joining the workforce yet feel unprepared or unsure that what they are interested in could become a fulfilling business.