Philosophy

Whether or not Haider has followed the ideological path of his compatriot Adolf Hitler, says Austrian political historian Höbelt, he has certainly followed his route to publicity around the world. He explores the politics of modern Austria, and debunks the myth that Haider is driven by passion rather than self-interest.
The book has four parts. The first provides a lengthy explication and critique of Derrida, a service still much needed by today's philosophers and literary theorists. The second part locates a recension of Heideggerian thought at a site the author calls centric mysticism. Throughout this section, there are original applications to literature. The third part presents the full-scale analysis of Nagarjunist technique, and then goes on to develop a "differential" Zen contrasting very much with the "centric" Zen of Suzuki. Replete with treatments of Buddhist poetry, it is bound to be of great interest to Buddhologists. The fourth part applies "differentialism" to monotheism and Christian theology and develops a non-entitative trinitarianism, which will revise, it is hoped, contemporary theology significantly. Two appendices, in a concrete way, apply to literary theory and criticism what the author has worked out in the body of the book
Doing Philosophy with Others portrays philosophy as a communicative endeavor energized by dialogical transactions in which the involved parties strive for an understanding of the meaning of their corporate existence. As suggested by the book's title, conversation, reminiscence, and reflection are entwined activities and processes. Reminiscence and reflection are understood as parts of dialogic encounters that stimulate the embodied conversational economy. Concrete illustrations of these encounters are provided in the conversations of the author with leading philosophers of the twentieth century. These varied conversations, some going back over fifty years, take the form of interviews, joint presentations, epistolary transactions, and casual exchanges of ideas. The postscript addresses issues pertaining to the role of narrative in everyday engagements, the struggle for multicultural understanding, the challenges of conversing across the disciplines in the present-day university, communication as constitutive of knowledge and self-identity, and the requirement for a transvaluation of the political.
Long recognized as one of the greatest medieval philosophical theologians, John Duns Scotus made his most innovative theoretical contributions in the area of metaphysics. A careful and detailed study of his argument for the existence of God and the theory of knowledge that makes this possible provides the most direct access to his basic ideas. Unlike the Five Ways of Thomas Aquinas or Anselm's famous Proslogion argument, Scotus's proof is of another order of complexity and amounts to a little "summa" of his metaphysics. Among those theologians to accept Aristotle's scientific theory, Scotus is perhaps the first to realize fully its negative consequences if the philosophical doctrines of divine illumination and the analogical concept of being interact. His treatment of the God-question is distinguished for its deliberatively holistic approach to what was conventionally a series of unrelated topics.
In Edmund Husserl's Phenomenology, Joseph J. Kockelmans provides the reader with a biographical sketch and an overview of the salient features of Husserl's thought. Kockelmans focuses on the essay for the Encyclopedia Britannica of 1928, Husserl's most Important effort to articulate the aims of phenomenology for a more general audience. Included are Husserl's text -- in the original German and in English translation on facing pages -- a synopsis, and an extensive commentary that relates Husserl's work as a whole to the essay for the Encyclopedia.
In 1991, Lawrence Grossman wrote that "a new political system is taking shape in the United States. As we approach the twenty-first century, America is turning into an electronic republic, a democratic system that is vastly increasing the people's day-to-day influence on decisions of state." Grossman's forecast implied a sea change in the way citizens would interact with, and participate in, their representative government; a revamping of the way Americans would 'do' citizenship. Harnessing the power of technology to promote the ideal of democracy that first pulsed through our nation over 230 years ago may be a feasible achievement in a technocratic age, but whether technology can help achieve a revolution as seismic as the political one that our founding fathers initiated may be a practical impossibility. Fusing the power of technology and democratic ideals opens opportunities for greater access to information and offers a medium for people to be heard and express their voice with dissemination to the masses through digital tools, such as blogs, podcasts, and wikis. Indeed, the emergence of the Internet as a nearly ubiquitous element of American society has brought about new opportunities to enhance citizen engagement in democratic politics and to increase the level of civic engagement among American citizens. Despite such rhetoric, however, research has indicated that Grossman's "electronic republic" has, for the most part, failed to come to fruition
It is now widely accepted that The Ethics of Deconstruction was the first book to argue for the ethical turn in Derrida's work. Critchley shows as powerfully as possible how deconstruction and persuasive ethical consequences are vital to our thinking through of questions relating to politics and democracy. Parts of the book have been published in several European languages and a complete edition will appear in German next year. This new edition will update and confirm this title as a standard reference work in the area of French philosophy and theory.
This volume concerns itself with the ethical principles and concepts relating to the environment: nature, resources and the planet. This is placed in the context of ethical theory, and consideration is given to the way these values have transformed received ethical traditions. Issues include the intrinsic value of nonhuman species, obligations to future generations, and the aesthetic needs of humanity. Both the universal responsibilities and their application are investigated. The international responsibilities to the planet are seen in the context of some of the most alarming future scenarios: limited access to water, the changing global climate, population explosion, the destruction of ecosystems, and even the extinction of humanity
Johann Gottlieb Fichte's Wissenscbaftslebre arises out of a particularly stormy period in the philosopher's personal, academic, and intellectual life. The work he produced is many things at once: an epistemology or theory of knowledge, a philosophical anthropology, an ethics or metaethics, the foundation for a political theory (Rousseau), the basis for an aesthetic program (Romanticism), perhaps even a philosophy of nature. Seidel presents the English and German text of part 1 of the Wissenscbaftsiebre, followed by a commentary on the text. The work concludes with a summary of parts 2 and 3 of the Wissenscbafislebre. An annotated bibliography surveys the important literature on the philosopher.
Neither journalistic nor sensationalistic eye-witness accounts, this is the first book of serious reflection on the moral background and issues of internal legality surrounding the events of Guantanamo Bay.
Part of the challenge in homeland security research is developing plans for emerging areas of research. In order to provide a solid basis for future needs, authors will comment on current information in their fields and provide directions for future scientific research in their areas. This volume will cover the following topics: Coordinating Effective Government Responses to Bio-terrorism; Interagency Relations in Animal Biosecurity Disasters; Nuclear Power Plant Security; Modeling and Analysis of Public Policies for Managing the Risks to Homeland Security; Security Screening; and Use of Advanced 3D Visualization for Bio-terror Crises Communication Training. This volume is a must for all who are involved with issues of homeland security from planners to administrators to researchers. The editors of this volume are members of the Purdue Homeland Security Institute, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana.
Human Rights Ethics makes an important contribution to contemporary philosophical and political debates concerning the advancement of global justice and human rights. Butler's book also lays claim to a significant place in both normative ethics and human rights studies in as much as it seeks to vindicate a universalistic, rational approach to human rights ethics. Butler's innovative approach is not based on murky claims to "natural rights" that supposedly hold wherever human beings exist; nor does it succumb to the traditional problems of justification associated with utilitarianism, Kantianism, and other procedural approaches to human rights studies. Instead, Butler proposes "a dialectical justification of human rights by indirect proof" that claims not to be question begging. Very much in the spirit of Hegel and Habermas, Butler proposes to vindicate a "totally rational account of human rights," but one that depends concretely and historically on a dialectically constructed "right to freedom of thought in its universal modes."
Georg Groddeck (1866-1934), who was trained as a physician but became famous for his success as a healer, introduced a radical concept in that we virtually always cause our own illness and injury; therefore, we can cure and avoid both. He utilized the technique of psychoanalysis to communicate with the source of the illness. In The Interpretation of Illness, Homer goes beyond Groddeck's initial insight to emphasize that illness is a communication to others, especially a call for sympathy. No one consciously likes to be sick or hurt; but we all, consciously or unconsciously, tell others about our ills, expecting them to extend sympathy. Interpretation is a series of letters from Homer, writing under the persona "Augie," to a friend. Appropriately enough, this style is similar to the format used by Groddeck in The Book of the It.
Craig Smith has provided an introduction and edition of John Macksoud's Other Illusions. This posthumous work, completed in 1973, reinforces a strain of relativistic theory that retrieves the Sophists and extends through Jacques Derrida to the present where many of us deal with constructed realities in our rhetorical theories. Macksoud was also offering a warning about pseudo-scientific research, a Philipic against the quantitative approach to communication theory. He not only attempted to reveal the rhetorical nature of their use of the scientific method, he tried to show that science itself was at base rhetorical. In form, the short book threatened the established order of the academic community. The book uses anecdotes, sayings, stories, and even jokes to mark off sections and to initiate new lines of thought. These devices were deemed subversive rather than performative because they are rarely, if ever, used in academic prose and because the messages they carry undercut normal ways of thinking.
Kant and the Unity of Reason is a comprehensive reconstruction and a detailed analysis of Kant's Critique of Judgment. In the light of the third Critique, the book offers a final interpretation of the critical project as a whole. It proposes a new reading of Kant's notion of human experience in which domains as different as knowledge, morality, the experience of beauty and life are finally viewed in a unified perspective. The book proposes a reading of Kant's critical project as one of the most sophisticated attempts in the history of philosophy to articulate a complex notion of human "sensibility" as an alternative to both 18th century empiricism and rationalism. The fundamental contribution of rationality to human experience cannot be fully appreciated if the sensuous component of experience is not adequately taken into account. For Kant, "sensibility" includes functions as different as sensation, intuition, perception, emotion, passion, drive, moral feeling, and feeling of pleasure and displeasure.Kant's idea of "reflective" judgment is the peculiar discovery of the third Critique. Reflective judgment articulates the interplay between sensibility and rationality, the world of nature and the human mind in order to constitute human experience and the sphere of human intersubjective relationships. In the act of reflection, Kant's philosophy finally comes to reflect upon itself and the meaning of its critical endeavor.
The genesis of Knights of the Plow: Oliver H. Kelley and the Origins of the Grange inrepublican Ideology was a public history project. . . . As Woods notes in his preface tothe book, the more he learned about the Grange founder, the less satisfied he became withthe existing interpretation of the ideological origins of the Grange. . . . In Knights of thePlow, Woods gives us a carefully researched and ably told story of the origins of theGrange and the formative life of its founder. Unique to this work is the author's analysisof the organization's intellectual roots in nineteenth-century liberal republicanism, anideological position which sought to reconcile the traditional values of Jeffersonianrepublicanism with the new values of liberal capitalism. In this endeavor as well, Woodsably argues his case."
Land and Law of California represents a collection of 13 essays by Paul W. Gates. Gates discusses and analyzes those those california land policies which date back to mid 1800's that have shaped present day landholdings in California
Learning and Knowledge for the Network Society discusses technology, policy and manage-ment in a context much influenced by a dynamic of change and a necessary balance between the creation and diffusion of knowledge. It is largely grounded on empirical experiences of different regional and national contexts and addresses the dynamics of the process of knowledge accumulation, which drives a learning society. This fact is reflected in the trend in developed economies towards an increasing investment in advanced technology, research and development, education, and culture, but also in the process of inclusive development, which should be considered for less-developed countries. Concepts such as learning ability, creativity, and sustained flexibility gain greater importance as guiding principles for the conduct of individuals, institutions, nations, and regions. It is thus legitimate to question the traditional way of viewing the role that contemporary institutions play in the process of economic development and to argue for the need to promote systems of innovation and competence building based on learning and knowledge networks
Michael Hyde's Life-Giving Gift of Acknowledgment is a brilliant and courageous work. It is brilliant in taking up an essential gesture of humanity-acknowledgment-and elaborating it by recourse to films, novels, poetry, philosophy, religion, science, and social controversy. In spite of this breathtaking reach, Hyde never loses sight of his purpose, to understand and affirm the moral-ontological-rhetorical gift of acknowledging another. The book is courageous because it dares place rhetoric and science into productive conversation and remains open to both. It is courageous because it takes up such emotionally difficult issues as the symbolism of the Confederate flag, what it meant to be heroic after September 11, 2001, and the ethical character of life in a world of computer technology. Hyde has done here what he does best-offer a philosophical-rhetorical investigation of a principle even as he enacts the moral dimension of the principle in telling his story. This is a profound, revealing, and indeed inspirational, work.
This book is a very nuanced, meticulously researched and vividly written study of a series of important debates in German literary circles since the fall of the Berlin Wall and the rapid political transformations that have accompanied German unification. Rosellini not only offers trenchant interpretations of major controversies of the last decade in Germany, but he also provides the necessary background information needed to make sense of these important public debates. An Open Access PDF version of this book has also been made available at the request of the author.
The great crisis of twentieth-century philosophy has been the loss of meaning as a criterion for conduct. With the collapse of the historical sociologies of the nineteenth century and their replacement by relativistic doctrines, contemporary thought has retreated to the fleeting present moment as the ground for describing action. In Meaning and Appreciation, Michael Weinstein traces the history of the failure of historical meaning, showing how the disappearance of collective purpose has altered our sense of time and made us aware that we are the creators of our time perspectives. Drawing upon the vitalistic tradition of Bergson, Weinstein returns to the intuition of the dur6e and argues that beneath practical life, we are rooted in successive lived presents. Weinstein identifies the lived present with appreciation, arguing that the life of expression, not nihilism, lies beyond the wreckage of historical teleology, The climax of Weinstein's work is an original vision of human existence, in which our essence is to express one another to ourselves. Vindicating our intrinsic sociality against the abstract and mechanistic claims of both individualism and collectivism, the author argues that our destiny is not to project meanings into a symbolic future, but to attend to and care for one another in the present. Weinstein's sensitive analysis offers new insights into such contemporary movements as existentialism, the sociology of knowledge, and cultural philosophy, evaluating all of them in terms of the fundamental tension in our society.
The contributions to this volume are divided into three parts, each introduced by one of the editors, and a general introduction which discusses the peculiarities of the Swiss case of state formation and nation building. The five chapters of Part I provide an idea of the variety of approaches and perspectives which currently exist in the study of nationhood and national identity. The authors of these contributions clarify basic concepts, show the deep and intractable ambiguity of classic distinctions, and point to new forces within nation-states which have seriously weakened their internal cohesion. All of these considerations give rise to new challenges for nationalist representations of the world and established institutions of social integration. Under present conditions, national identity and political solidarity have to compete with other, crosscutting ways of creating boundaries: ethnic and cultural fragmentation, gender and sexual divides, or divisions in the labor market. In Part II, the recent experiences of a selected number of countries- Belgium , Austria , Germany , Croatia , and Israel -are presented to illustrate the great diversity of current challenges to national identities. Processes such as globalization and European integration have had an impact on all of them, but mobilization by regional move-ments, reunification of separate territorial parts, the differentiation of formerly homogeneous ethnic identities, the sequels of war, and the country-specific historical legacies, interact with these global processes to constitute many different challenges for national identities and nationhood. Finally, the two contributions in Part III show that the process of European integra- tion gives rise to different images and fulfills different functions for the various nations involved, but it has not yet been able to shape a new European identity.
Ockham's views on many subjects have been misunderstood, including his views on ethics. This book is designed to avoid pitfalls that arise in reading medieval philosophy generally and Ockham in particular.
Essays explore the origins of the current situation in global financial capital from the perspectives of economics, geography, international law, and international politics. Specific topics include offshore and the structural building of sovereignty, international banking and offshore finance, and offshore finance and citizenship. Includes case studies on tax havens, such as Malaysia, Malta, and South Africa
Hegel is one of the most important modern philosophers, whose thought influenced the development of existentialism, Marxism, pragmatism, hermeneutics and deconstruction. Yet Hegel's central text, the monumental Science of Logic, still remains for most philosophers (both figuratively and literally) a firmly closed book. The purpose of The Opening of Hegel's Science of Logic is to dispel the myths that surround the Logic and to show that Hegel's unjustly neglected text is a work of extraordinary subtlety and insight. Part One argues that the Logic provides a rigorous derivation of the fundamental categories of thought and contrasts Hegel's approach to the categories with that of Kant. It goes on to examine the historical and linguistic presuppositions of Hegel's self-critical, "presuppositionless" logic and, in the process, considers several significant criticisms of such logic advanced by Schelling, Feuerbach, Gadamer and Kierkegaard. Separate chapters are devoted to the relationship between logic and ontology in Hegel's Logic and to the relationship between the Logic itself and the Phenomenology.Part Two contains the text - in German and English - of the first two chapters of Hegel's Logic, which cover such categories as being, becoming, something, limit, finitude and infinity. Part Three then provides a clear and accessible commentary on these two chapters that both examines Hegel's arguments in detail and relates his insights to those of other philosophers, such as Descartes, Spinoza, Kant, Nietzsche and Levinas. The Opening of Hegel's Science of Logic aims to help students and scholars read Hegel's often formidably difficult text for themselves and discover the wealth of philosophical riches that it contains. It also argues that Hegel's project of a presuppositionless science of logic is one that deserves serious consideration today