Philosophy

Perspective on Philosophy of Communication provides readers with an appreciation of philosophy of communication as central to understanding and guiding communicative action in a postmodern culture. Each chapter provides readers with an understanding of the perspective of a well-recognized philosopher(s) and addresses how his/her work creatively informs current problems and issues in human communication. This work provides an opportunity for readers to engage the interpretive, creative, and ultimately pragmatic spirit of selected philosophers who open the possibilities of communicative content in different ways.
The Pbaedrus lies at the heart of Plato's work, and the topics it discusses are central to his thought. In its treatment of the topics of the soul, the ideas and love, it is closely tied to the other dialogues of Plato's "middle period," the Pbaedo, the Symposium, and the Republic
The central concern of these eight studies and essays is the understanding and critique of culture at the shifty boundaries between the Modem and the Postmodern epochs. The author contends that what needs to be addressed is the very abyss, the "spacetime" between the Modem and the Postmodern worldviews, as well as the tension between aesthetics and ethics, critical discourse and the creative arts, in an effort to rethink multireferential processes of signification. The keystone of the book is Carravetta's notion of Diaphoristics, a theory of interpretation as dialogue. Diaphora, or difference, refers to the ancient quarrel between poetry and philosophy and signifies the movement between asymmetrical or heterogeneous forms of discourse that have, both historically and speculatively, home the transfer of meaning from one semantic/hermeneutic field to another. The author focuses on the necessary risk and duplicity of criticism and develops nonagonistic models based on figuration and rhetorical dynamics.
This is a book about the human sciences. However, it is not a treatise on scientific methodology nor is it a proposal for a unification of the human sciences through an integration of their findings within a general conceptual scheme. This book is also, and at the same time, a book about the philosophical study of man.
This book brings together essays from leading Nietzsche scholars to examine a variety of key ideas in Nietzsche's writings that have been marginalized or slighted because they do not fit neatly into any of the usual categories of Nietzsche scholarship. The essays open up fresh perspectives on Nietzsche and will inspire constructive debate about his relevance to a variety of current philosophical, political, social, and cultural concerns.
Scholars from different disciplines and perspectives increasingly recognize that modern regional economic growth critically depends on factors like active networking, favorable institutions, entrepreneurial spirit and a fast production and circulation of knowledge. Regional Development and Conditions for Innovation in the Network Society is organized in three main parts. Part I, titled "Emerging Concepts and Approaches," has four chapters that focus on the key concepts of innovation and sustainability and on evolutionary thinking. In addition, an overall picture is given of approaches to innovation in a spatial context and to regional policymaking. Part II, titled "Telecom Infrastructures Strategies and Implications," has five chapters with a focus on the adoption strategy of ICT by various governments and on implications of ICT use on housing and production. Part III, "Conditions for Networks, Entrepreneurship and Development of High-Tech Clusters," contains seven chapters, each with a focus on requirements for high-technology based economic growth, such as technology competence, job features, the role of change agents, venture capital and specific networking.
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) presents himself several times as a physician of culture. He considers it his task to make a diagnosis of the culture of his age, to point to the latent or patent diseases, but also to the possibilities to overcome them. His diagnosis, prognosis, and prescriptions implied an overcoming of traditional interpretation of what is going on in the main domains of culture: knowledge, morality, religion, and art. This book presents Nietzsche's thoughts on knowledge and reality, on morality and politics, and on religion. Preceding these main dialogues is an introduction on the art of reading Nietzsche's texts and on his art of writing.
Written in the context of critical dialogues about the war on terror and the global crisis in human rights violations, authors of the collected volume Representing Humanity in an Age of Terror, edited by Sophia A. McClennen and Henry James Morello, ask a series of questions: What definitions of humanity account for the persistence of human rights violations? How do we define terror and how do we understand the ways that terror affects the representation of those that both suffer and profit from it? Why is it that the representation of terror often depends on a distorted (for example, racist, fascist, xenophobic, essentialist, eliminationist) representation of human beings? And, most importantly, can representation, especially forms of art, rescue humanity from the forces of terror or does it run the risk of making it possible?The authors of the volume's articles discuss aspects of terror with regard to human rights events across the globe, but especially in the United States, Latin America, and Europe. Their discussion and reflection demonstrate that the need to question continuously and to engage in permanent critique does not contradict the need to seek answers, to advocate social change, and to intervene critically. With contributions by scholars, activists, and artists, the articles collected here offer strategies for intervening critically in debates about the connections between terror and human rights as they are taking place across contemporary society. The work presented in the volume is intended for scholars, as well as undergraduate and graduate students in fields of the humanities and social sciences including political science, sociology, history, literary study, cultural studies, and cultural anthropology.
In the 1860s and 1870s, Danubian Romania embarked on its difficult transition from political subordination to independence. Throughout this arduous process, Romanians faced perplexing challenges from the neighboring empires of Russia, Austria-Hungary, and Turkey, plus persistent meddling in their affairs by West European powers. The battle for independence affected, and was affected by, such issues as Romania's quest for progress, its internal civil rights, and its relations with other Balkan nationalities. In tracing the complicated interaction of these elements, Frederick Kellogg explores the development of Romanian railroads and trade, Romanian anti-Semitism, and Balkan nationalism and Bulgarian revolutionary currents. Russia's war against Turkey and the subsequent peace agreements brought about constitutional change and territorial sacrifice for Romania, along with annexation between the lower Danube River and the Black Sea. Using sources cuffed from little-known Romanian and other European archives and libraries, Kellogg convincingly explains why and how the powers interacted with one another and with Romania, and how Romanian political leaders responded to provocations and opportunities throughout the momentous passage to independent statehood.
Homeland security has occupied the news since 9/11. Still, much of the research about security risks, types of threats, and other vital data remains unsubstantiated. Using the tools that verify scientific finding, the editors have moved the issues of homeland security to a level above rhetoric and hearsay. Authors, in this volume, review the current literature, critique current information, and provide suggestions for future research in several areas. Topics in this volume include: Risk and Crisis Communication Strategies in Response to Bioterrorism; Security Issues in Water Infrastructure; Fundamental Causes of International Terrorism; Understanding, Measuring, Modeling, and Management of Risks to Homeland Security; Biosensors for Detection of Nerve Agents and Agricultural Pesticides; Detection of Bacterial Pathogens and Toxins; Anti-crop bioterrorism; and Medical Biosurveillance. This volume is a must for all who are involved with issues of homeland security from planners to administrators to researchers. The editors of this volume are members of the Purdue Homeland Security Institute, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana except Daniel R. Dolk who is at the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California.
Merrell's specific focus in this interdisciplinary study is the modernism/postmodernism dichotomy and Peirce's precocious realization that the world does not lend itself to the simplistic binarism of modernist thought. In Merrell's examination of postmodern phenomena, the reader is taken through various facets of the cognitive sciences, philosophy of science, mathematics, and literary theory. Throughout this work, Merrell. is scrupulously aware that we are participants within, not detached spectators of, our signs. We understand them while we interact with them, during which process we, and our signs as well, invariably undergo change
De Dijn's comprehensive introduction to Spinoza's philosophy is based on two key texts. He first provides an in-depth analysis of Spinoza's Treatise on the Improvement of the Understanding, which De Dijn characterizes as his introduction to philosophy. This notoriously difficult text is here made accessible, even in its details. This analysis is followed by a comprehensive survey of Spinoza's metaphysics as presented in his famous Ethics. De Dijn demonstrates how Spinoza's central philosophical project as introduced in the Treatise-the linkage of knowledge and salvation-is perfectly realized in the Ethics. In this way the unity of Spinoza's thought is shown to consist in his preoccupation with the "ethical" question of salvation. The book also contains introductory chapters on Spinoza's life and work, the original Latin text of the Treatise and its new English translation by Edwin Curley, and an annotated bibliography on the secondary literature.
This volume contains three sections of essays which examine the role of commemoration and public celebrations in the creation of a national identity in Habsburg lands. It also seeks to engage historians of culture and of nationalism in other geographic fields as well as colleagues who work on Habsburg Central Europe, but write about nationalism from different vantage points. There is hope that this work will help generate a dialogue, especially with colleagues who live in the regions that were analyzed. Many of the authors consider the commemorations discussed in this volume from very different points of view, as they themselves are strongly rooted in a historical context that remains much closer to the nationalism we critique.
The history of the Habsburg Monarchy and Austria in the early modern period continues to capture the interest of many scholars. This collection of essays by twenty leading authorities from the United States, Austria, Germany, Great Britain, and the Netherlands focuses on the interplay between the Habsburg government and a multiplicity of social aspects. As a whole, State and Society in Early Modern Austria reexamines and sometimes debunks old views about the Habsburg Monarchy and provides insight into the current historical thinking on the early modern state. Moreover, this broad focus will help the reader understand the complex cultural heritage of the turbulent nationalities of East Central Europe.
Mohamoud's work considers the underlying causes for the breakdown of the state across both time and space. Time is considered across the triple history - the pre-colonial, colonial and post colonial processes. Space is used in the sense of taking the whole of Somalia as a unit of analysis. This approach enables the discovery of different structural crises over a period of time and examines these cumulative effects on the current upheavals in Somalia. Among the approaches, State Collapse and Post-Conflict Developments in Africa covers the constraints in the harsh material environment; the subsistence pastoral mode of existence; the colonial intervention and the subsequent division of the land into five parts; Cold War geopolitics; decades of armed struggles; and the post-colonial crisis of governance.
The American thinker Charles Sanders Peirce, best known as the founder of pragmatism, has been influential not only in the pragmatic tradition but more recently in the philosophy of science and the study of semiotics, or sign theory. Strands of System provides an accessible overview of Peirce's systematic philosophy for those who are beginning to explore his thinking and its import for more recent trends in philosophy.
The Amish Schools of Indiana studies the history of the Old Order Amish parochial school movement in Indiana from its beginnings in 1948 through the 2001 2002 school year. Included in the work are complete descriptions of buildings and grounds, as well as descriptive essays on the pupils and their teachers, the curriculum, the values that are taught, and the religious community that surrounds and supports the school. Readers are invited into the school at numerous points, to sit in on classes, school programs, and impromptu celebrations, as they read anecdotal accounts of real experiences. While preserving the anonymity and Amish proscription against posed pictures, the book makes generous use of photographs to document the current state of Old Order Amish education in Indiana.
Leadership of the future requires you go beyond the numbers. By linking the ancient past with the present and the East with the West, Donald Cyr puts leadership in a global perspective.The Art of Global Thinking shows how the ancient myths from the hunting societies of the West and the planting societies of the East have been transformed to today's corporate boardroom and business practices. The book takes an innovative approach to link the "Individual Self" from the West and the "Civic Self" from the East to emotional intelligence, leadership style, and corporate performance. In doing so, the book links our two contrasting but complementary capabilities for logic and intuition, individualism and collectivism, and distinctiveness and harmony.The Art of Global Thinking draws from the insight of mythology, philosophy, religion, and ancient writing and fuses modern research, cultural difference and business know-how to suggest an innovative approach to leadership. It looks at Eastern and Western values not as different, but rather as complementary, and shows how each serves to define and enhance the other.
In a critical dialogue with the metaphysical tradition from Plato to Hegel to contemporary schools of thought, the author convincingly argues that traditional rationalist metaphysics has failed to accomplish its goal of demonstrating the existence of a divine cause and moral purpose of the world. To replace the defective rationalist metaphysics, the author builds a new metaphysics on the idea that moods and affects make manifest the world's felt meanings; he argues that each feature of the world is a felt meaning in the sense that each feature is a source of a feeling-response if and when it appears. The author asserts that we must synthesize our two ways of knowing-poetic evocations and exact analyses-in order to decide which mood or affect is the appropriate appreciation of any given feature of the world. Smith gives evocative and exact explications of such features as the world's temporality, appearance, and mind-independency, as these features appear in the appropriate recitations.
A collection of essays studying the short stories of Henry James from 1843 to 1916. As a tribute to their professor, William T. Stafford, Joseph Dewey and Brooke Horrath gathered a contentious lot of essayists who take provocative stands and dare us to re-encounter Henry James.
Drawn from the "Alice McDermott Memorial Lectures in Applied Ethics" held at the United States Air Force Academy, these 20 essays contribute to our understanding of ethics and leadership. Contributions come from a distinguished and diverse group of individuals including, Allan Bloom, Reverend Edward A. Malloy, John T. Noonan, Jr., James F. Childress, Christina Hoff Sommers, General Ronald R. Fogelman, and William J. Bennett. The range of topics include moral certainty and sensibility, professional and personal integrity, emergency ethics and the responsibility of war criminals, the just war and public policy, unethical adversaries and military obligation, and liberal education and character.
The Mark of the Beast historically and critically examines the dire affects of the process of animalization on both humans and animals. Roberts provides a general account of the theoretical division between humans and animals begun largely in the work of Aristotle and continued in that of Descartes and Kant. Following the philosophical provenance of the idea of animality, Roberts explores the practical and "scientific" uses of this idea, focusing largely on what Stephen J. Gould terms the "biodeterministic tradition" by evaluating the primarily ninteenth century theories of atavism, craniology, recapitulation, and so on, while also exploring the use of medical and psychological techniques of animalization.
New York Public Intellectuals and Beyond gathers a variety of distinguished scholars, from Eugene Goodheart to Peter Novick to Nathan Glazer, from Morris Dickstein to Suzanne Klingenstein to Ilan Stavans, to revisit and rethink the legacy of the New York intellectuals. The authors show how a small New York group, predominantly Jewish, moved from communist and socialist roots to become a primary voice of liberal humanism and, in the case of a few, to launch a new conservative movement. Concentrating on Lionel Trilling as the paradigmatic liberal intellectual, the book also includes thoughtful reconsiderations of Irving Howe and Dwight MacDonald, and explores the roots of the neoconservative movement and its changing role today.
Ethics is customarily understood as being concerned with questions of responsibility for and in the face of an other who is like we assume ourselves to be. Such an anthropocentric presumption has been significantly challenged by computer technology, intelligent systems, virtual realities, and cybernetics, all of which introduce the possibility of others that are and remain otherwise. Thinking Otherwise investigates the unique challenges, complications, and possibilities introduced by these different forms of otherness. The author formulates alternative ways of proceeding that are able to respond to and to be responsible for these other different forms of otherness in order to generate and develop alternative ways of thinking that are and remain oriented otherwise.
The fruit of the author's many courses on Emmanuel Levinas in Europe and the United States, this study is a clear introduction for graduate students and scholars who are not yet familiar with Levinas's difficult but exceptionally important oeuvre. After a first chapter on the existential background and the key issues of his thought, chapters 2, 3, and 4 concentrate on and include a short text, "Philosophy and the idea of the Infinite," which contains the program of Levinas's entire oeuvre. Chapter 5 is a companion to the reading of Levinas's first opus magnum, Totality and the Infinite. It analyzes the structure of this book and shows how its questions and answers adhere together. "Through phenomenology toward a saying beyond phenomena and essence" could be the summary of Levinas's attempt to think, with and against Martin Heidegger, the otherness of the Other. This is brought out even more clearly in his second opus magnum, Otherwise Than Being or Beyond Essence, whose significance is shown in chapter 6. A bibliography is added to facilitate further study.