Psychology

Afternoons with Puppy is a heartwarming account of dynamic relationships and outcomes involving a therapist, his therapy animals, and his patients over the course of almost two decades. It is a narrative of Dr. Fine's experiences and the growing respect for the power of the animals effect on his patients and himself.
The integration of animals into the therapy setting by psychotherapists has been a growing trend. Psychological problems treated include emotional and behavioral problems, attachment issues, trauma, and developmental disorders. An influential 1970s survey suggests that over 20 percent of therapists in the psychotherapy division of the American Psychological Association incorporated animals into their treatment in some fashion. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the number is much higher today.   Since Yeshiva University psychologist Boris Levinson popularized the involvement of animals in psychotherapy in the 1960s, Israel has come to be perhaps the most advanced country in the world in the area of animal-assisted psychotherapy (AAP). This is true especially in the areas of academic training programs, theory-building, and clinical practice. Great effort has been put into understanding the mechanisms behind AAP, as well as into developing ethical guidelines that take into account the therapist's responsibility toward both client and animal.   This book exposes the world to the theory and practice of AAP as conceived and used in Israel. It emphasizes evidence-based and clinically sound applications with psychotherapeutic goals, as differentiated from other animal-assisted interventions, such as AAE (animal-assisted education) and AAA (animal-assisted activities), which may have education or skills-oriented goals. Not just anyone with a dog can call him- or herself an animal-assisted therapist. This volume demonstrates not only the promise of animal-assisted psychotherapeutic approaches, but also some of the challenges the field still needs to overcome to gain widespread legitimacy.  
This book gathers, in one place, those measures presently used to study the human-companion animal bond. The measures chosen for inclusion are the most heavily used by researchers, as well as measures that appear to be innovative or relate to the different aspects of the human-companion animal relationship. The measures cover the human-animal bond principally by attachment, but also by fear, abuse, or neglect.
At Wit's End is a simple, straightforward, and easy-to-read summary about Alzheimer's as a disease and condition, written without technical jargon and impractical detail. About 33% of the population will eventually provide care for someone with Alzheimer's. The strain to maintain the medical well-being and mental health stability of a loved one with Alzheimer's can be enormous. Still, providing care, enhancing the value of living, can be amply rewarding. Many books delve into other areas of Alzheimer's emphasizing the financial, legal, and treatment needs of the afflicted. At Wit's End is unique since it not only explains the psychiatric and psychological aspects of Alzheimer's but helps family members or caregivers discover a wealth of effective interventions. Kraus focuses on the whole person and his/her social, psychological, physical, and spiritual life.Find out"How Alzheimer's can be distinguished from normal aging and other diseases that mimic its symptoms;"How the disorder affects changes in functional abilities how an Alzheimer's daily competence is viewed by psychiatric and legal communities;"How rational think is distorted leading to a wide array of behaviors like agitation, impatience, wandering, and inappropriate expressions of sexuality;"What medical treatments are available, both traditional and alternative. At Wit's End gives families and caregivers a new outlook on Alzheimer's.
This is an authoritative study into a traditionally taboo subject. It is not a work of erotica but presents the works of authorities on the subject. The authors have researched, as far as is possible, those who do, or have indulged in the practices since the beginnings of human history. The book also contains a useful bibliography.
Pets play a greater role in our emotional and physical health than ever before, says the Purdue University professor who is co-author of his revised edition of Between Pets and People: The Importance of Animal Companionship. The book by Alan M. Beck of Purdue's School of Veterinary Medicine and Aaron H. Katcher, psychiatrist and professor emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania, explores the emotional and physical benefits of owning a pet and analyzes the complex relationship between people and pets. "The study of the importance of the relationship between people and animals is a growing field and has the potential to be part of the whole human-health field," says Beck, director of Purdue's Center for Applied Ethology and Human-Animal Interaction. "The social milieu on where animals fit into society has really changed in the last 13 years. We've gone from recognizing the potential of animals being a significant positive contribution to certain populations, such as the elderly, to actual documentation." Beck and Katcher note a 1992 study by an Australian cardiologist of 5,000 people who visited a clinic to find ways to reduce heart disease. The study found that people with pets had lower blood pressure and lower blood fat levels than those without pets, even though the two groups were alike in diet and exercise. The authors also point to the trend by nursing homes to incorporate animals into the routine and environment for patients. For example, in the early 1980s nursing homes typically did not allow pets to visit patients, while today nearly half of the homes have an organized program for animal therapy, Beck says. In addition to exploring physical benefits, the book covers such topics as pets as family members, pets as therapists, talking to pets, and how pets can teach us to become better companions to friends and family. The book also has a list of Web sites by such organizations as Canine Companions for Independence and the American Kennel Club. While pets provide health benefits, they can create problems, Beck and Katcher say. "There is no medicine that doesn't have some side effects," Beck says. For example, more pet ownership has public-health implications such as more dog bites, he notes. And some people whose pets die grieve to the point of illness, he says. But grief over the loss of an animal is not new, Beck says. Ancient Egyptians shaved their eyebrows after their cats died, and the Roman emperor Caligula had his horse entombed.
James and Eileen Goggin describe the interaction between Jewish and Gentile analysts before and after the Third Reich, demonstrating how most of the Gentile analysts quickly adapted to the new regimens demands, while the Jews were forced to emigrate.
Michael Hyde's Life-Giving Gift of Acknowledgment is a brilliant and courageous work. It is brilliant in taking up an essential gesture of humanity-acknowledgment-and elaborating it by recourse to films, novels, poetry, philosophy, religion, science, and social controversy. In spite of this breathtaking reach, Hyde never loses sight of his purpose, to understand and affirm the moral-ontological-rhetorical gift of acknowledging another. The book is courageous because it dares place rhetoric and science into productive conversation and remains open to both. It is courageous because it takes up such emotionally difficult issues as the symbolism of the Confederate flag, what it meant to be heroic after September 11, 2001, and the ethical character of life in a world of computer technology. Hyde has done here what he does best-offer a philosophical-rhetorical investigation of a principle even as he enacts the moral dimension of the principle in telling his story. This is a profound, revealing, and indeed inspirational, work.
Business and industry leaders are eager to find ways to spark the creative instinct in their work forces. This newly translated work examines the multi-layered environment of innovation by melding the thoughts of business management pundits like Peter Senge with the views of artist, politicians, and other non-traditional thinkers like Tao Ho, Peter Greenaway, and Wolfgang Rihm.
The Psyche of Feminism argues that a feminist ethics, in order to be both feminist and ethical, needs to embrace psychoanalysis. After reviewing the relation between feminism and psychoanalysis and arguing for the centrality of psychoanalysis to feminist thought, the study offers an analysis of two attempts by George Sand to reimagine the sexual relationship (Letters to Marcie, Lelia), where the emphasis is on political injustice and the impossibility of women's desires. Moving from rights and desires to the question of pleasures, Peebles then takes up a relatively little-read work by Colette, The Pure and the Impure, in which the narrator suggests that pleasure and its corporeal language hold the key to any understanding of masculinity and femininity. We are then led to the risky question of ""neutrality"" put forward by Nathalie Sarraute ( You Don't Love Yourself ), whose work forces a psychoana­lytic feminism to face the question: what if sexual difference itself is a ruse? Does the notion of a human neutrality condemn us either to a bygone humanism or to psycho­sis? The final chapter of the work synthesizes these analyses, and argues for a fundamental feminist rethinking of the ideal of equality, an ideal that figures significantly—and uneasily—in each of the works this book treats.
In a critical dialogue with the metaphysical tradition from Plato to Hegel to contemporary schools of thought, the author convincingly argues that traditional rationalist metaphysics has failed to accomplish its goal of demonstrating the existence of a divine cause and moral purpose of the world. To replace the defective rationalist metaphysics, the author builds a new metaphysics on the idea that moods and affects make manifest the world's felt meanings; he argues that each feature of the world is a felt meaning in the sense that each feature is a source of a feeling-response if and when it appears. The author asserts that we must synthesize our two ways of knowing-poetic evocations and exact analyses-in order to decide which mood or affect is the appropriate appreciation of any given feature of the world. Smith gives evocative and exact explications of such features as the world's temporality, appearance, and mind-independency, as these features appear in the appropriate recitations.
What role does an animal play in a child's developing sense of self? This book addresses these and other intriguing questions by revealing the interconnected lives of the inhabitants of the preschool classroom with birds, turtles, bugs, and other creatures. This book provides a delightful and rewarding opportunity for parents, educators, and students of early childhood social development, as well as scholars of the intersection of human experience and the natural environment.
The Three Person Solution resolves problems with human interaction by formalizing three person relationships. Two against one dynamics disappear. Double binds dissolve. A collaborative relational practice becomes possible for many people. Two person relationships benefit indirectly. Our tendency is to view any three person interaction in classic dramatic terms, but the structure of this relational practice, called Threeing, is not a narrative structure. The Three do not interact dramatically following a story line to an ending. Rather, the Three interact recursively, following a circuit that balances relationships. To partake in the process of Threeing, narrative expectations must be abandoned. The practice of Threeing can keep relationships healthy and thriving in family settings, intercultural situations, educational programs, collaborative research, collaborative art making, peace making, governance, management, online groups, worker training and environmental initiatives. This book includes an explanation of the theory of Threeing based on the cybernetics of Gregory Bateson and the philosophy of Charles Peirce, examples of Threeing in education and worker training, and detailed instructions for using the Three Person Solution.
Theory of Mind is what enables us to “put ourselves in another’s shoes.” It is mindreading, empathy, creative imagination of another’s perspective: in short, it is simultaneously a highly sophisticated ability and a very basic necessity for human communication. Theory of Mind is central to such commercial endeavors as market research and product development, but it is also just as important in maintaining human relations over a cup of coffee. Not surprisingly, it is a critical tool in reading and understanding literature, which abounds with characters, situations, and “other people’s shoes.” Furthermore, it is becoming increasingly apparent that reading literature also hones these critical mindreading skills. Theory of Mind and Literature is a collection of nineteen essays by prominent scholars (linguists, cognitive scientists, and philosophers) working in the cutting-edge field of cognitive literary studies, which explores how we use Theory of Mind in reading and understanding literature.   Table of Contents   1: Theory of Mind Now and Then: Evolutionary and Historical Perspectives Theory of Mind and Theory of Minds in Literature by Keith Oatley Social Minds in Little Dorrit by Alan PalmerThe Way We Imagine by Mark TurnerTheory of Mind and Fictions of Embodied Transparency by Lisa Zunshine 2: Mind Reading and Literary Characterization Theory of the Murderous Mind: Understanding the Emotional Intensity of  John Doyle’s Interpretation of Sondheim’s Sweeney Todd by Diana CalderazzoDistraction as Liveliness of Mind: A Cognitive Approach to Characterization in Jane Austen by Natalie PhillipsSancho Panza’s Theory of Mind by Howard MancingIs Perceval Autistic?: Theory of Mind in the Conte del Graal by Paula Leverage 3: Theory of Mind and Literary / Linguistic Structure Whose Mind’s Eye? Free Indirect Discourse and the Covert Narrator in Marlene Streeruwitz’s Nachwelt by Jennifer Marston WilliamAttractors, Trajectors, and Agents in Racine’s “Récit de Théramène” by Allen G. WoodThe Importance of Deixis and Attributive Style for the Study of  Theory of Mind: The Example of William Faulkner’s Disturbed Characters by Ineke Bockting 4: Alternate States of Mind Alternative Theory of Mind for Artificial Brains: A Logical Approach to Interpreting Alien Minds by Orley K. MarronReading Phantom Minds: Marie Darrieussecq’s Naissance des fantômes and Ghosts’ Body Language by Mikko KeskinenTheory of Mind and Metamorphoses in Dreams: Jekyll & Hyde, and The Metamorphosis by Richard Schweickert and Zhuangzhuang XiMother/Daughter Mind Reading and Ghostly Intervention in Toni Morrison’s Beloved by Klarina Priborkin 5: Theoretical, Philosophical, Political Approaches Changing Minds: Theory of Mind and Propaganda in Egon Erwin Kisch’s Asien gründlich verändert by Seth KnoxFunctional Brain Imaging and the Problem of Other Minds by Dan Lloyd, Vince Calhoun, Godfrey Pearlson, and Robert AsturHow is it Possible to Have Empathy? Four Models by Fritz BreithauptTheory of Mind and the Conscience in El casamiento engañoso by José Barroso Castro