Public Policy

Part of the challenge in homeland security research is developing plans for emerging areas of research. In order to provide a solid basis for future needs, authors will comment on current information in their fields and provide directions for future scientific research in their areas. This volume will cover the following topics: Coordinating Effective Government Responses to Bio-terrorism; Interagency Relations in Animal Biosecurity Disasters; Nuclear Power Plant Security; Modeling and Analysis of Public Policies for Managing the Risks to Homeland Security; Security Screening; and Use of Advanced 3D Visualization for Bio-terror Crises Communication Training. This volume is a must for all who are involved with issues of homeland security from planners to administrators to researchers. The editors of this volume are members of the Purdue Homeland Security Institute, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana.
The genesis of Knights of the Plow: Oliver H. Kelley and the Origins of the Grange inrepublican Ideology was a public history project. . . . As Woods notes in his preface tothe book, the more he learned about the Grange founder, the less satisfied he became withthe existing interpretation of the ideological origins of the Grange. . . . In Knights of thePlow, Woods gives us a carefully researched and ably told story of the origins of theGrange and the formative life of its founder. Unique to this work is the author's analysisof the organization's intellectual roots in nineteenth-century liberal republicanism, anideological position which sought to reconcile the traditional values of Jeffersonianrepublicanism with the new values of liberal capitalism. In this endeavor as well, Woodsably argues his case."
Land and Law of California represents a collection of 13 essays by Paul W. Gates. Gates discusses and analyzes those those california land policies which date back to mid 1800's that have shaped present day landholdings in California
Learning and Knowledge for the Network Society discusses technology, policy and manage-ment in a context much influenced by a dynamic of change and a necessary balance between the creation and diffusion of knowledge. It is largely grounded on empirical experiences of different regional and national contexts and addresses the dynamics of the process of knowledge accumulation, which drives a learning society. This fact is reflected in the trend in developed economies towards an increasing investment in advanced technology, research and development, education, and culture, but also in the process of inclusive development, which should be considered for less-developed countries. Concepts such as learning ability, creativity, and sustained flexibility gain greater importance as guiding principles for the conduct of individuals, institutions, nations, and regions. It is thus legitimate to question the traditional way of viewing the role that contemporary institutions play in the process of economic development and to argue for the need to promote systems of innovation and competence building based on learning and knowledge networks
This book is a very nuanced, meticulously researched and vividly written study of a series of important debates in German literary circles since the fall of the Berlin Wall and the rapid political transformations that have accompanied German unification. Rosellini not only offers trenchant interpretations of major controversies of the last decade in Germany, but he also provides the necessary background information needed to make sense of these important public debates. An Open Access PDF version of this book has also been made available at the request of the author.
The contributions to this volume are divided into three parts, each introduced by one of the editors, and a general introduction which discusses the peculiarities of the Swiss case of state formation and nation building. The five chapters of Part I provide an idea of the variety of approaches and perspectives which currently exist in the study of nationhood and national identity. The authors of these contributions clarify basic concepts, show the deep and intractable ambiguity of classic distinctions, and point to new forces within nation-states which have seriously weakened their internal cohesion. All of these considerations give rise to new challenges for nationalist representations of the world and established institutions of social integration. Under present conditions, national identity and political solidarity have to compete with other, crosscutting ways of creating boundaries: ethnic and cultural fragmentation, gender and sexual divides, or divisions in the labor market. In Part II, the recent experiences of a selected number of countries- Belgium , Austria , Germany , Croatia , and Israel -are presented to illustrate the great diversity of current challenges to national identities. Processes such as globalization and European integration have had an impact on all of them, but mobilization by regional move-ments, reunification of separate territorial parts, the differentiation of formerly homogeneous ethnic identities, the sequels of war, and the country-specific historical legacies, interact with these global processes to constitute many different challenges for national identities and nationhood. Finally, the two contributions in Part III show that the process of European integra- tion gives rise to different images and fulfills different functions for the various nations involved, but it has not yet been able to shape a new European identity.
Essays explore the origins of the current situation in global financial capital from the perspectives of economics, geography, international law, and international politics. Specific topics include offshore and the structural building of sovereignty, international banking and offshore finance, and offshore finance and citizenship. Includes case studies on tax havens, such as Malaysia, Malta, and South Africa
Scholars from different disciplines and perspectives increasingly recognize that modern regional economic growth critically depends on factors like active networking, favorable institutions, entrepreneurial spirit and a fast production and circulation of knowledge. Regional Development and Conditions for Innovation in the Network Society is organized in three main parts. Part I, titled "Emerging Concepts and Approaches," has four chapters that focus on the key concepts of innovation and sustainability and on evolutionary thinking. In addition, an overall picture is given of approaches to innovation in a spatial context and to regional policymaking. Part II, titled "Telecom Infrastructures Strategies and Implications," has five chapters with a focus on the adoption strategy of ICT by various governments and on implications of ICT use on housing and production. Part III, "Conditions for Networks, Entrepreneurship and Development of High-Tech Clusters," contains seven chapters, each with a focus on requirements for high-technology based economic growth, such as technology competence, job features, the role of change agents, venture capital and specific networking.
Written in the context of critical dialogues about the war on terror and the global crisis in human rights violations, authors of the collected volume Representing Humanity in an Age of Terror, edited by Sophia A. McClennen and Henry James Morello, ask a series of questions: What definitions of humanity account for the persistence of human rights violations? How do we define terror and how do we understand the ways that terror affects the representation of those that both suffer and profit from it? Why is it that the representation of terror often depends on a distorted (for example, racist, fascist, xenophobic, essentialist, eliminationist) representation of human beings? And, most importantly, can representation, especially forms of art, rescue humanity from the forces of terror or does it run the risk of making it possible?The authors of the volume's articles discuss aspects of terror with regard to human rights events across the globe, but especially in the United States, Latin America, and Europe. Their discussion and reflection demonstrate that the need to question continuously and to engage in permanent critique does not contradict the need to seek answers, to advocate social change, and to intervene critically. With contributions by scholars, activists, and artists, the articles collected here offer strategies for intervening critically in debates about the connections between terror and human rights as they are taking place across contemporary society. The work presented in the volume is intended for scholars, as well as undergraduate and graduate students in fields of the humanities and social sciences including political science, sociology, history, literary study, cultural studies, and cultural anthropology.
In the 1860s and 1870s, Danubian Romania embarked on its difficult transition from political subordination to independence. Throughout this arduous process, Romanians faced perplexing challenges from the neighboring empires of Russia, Austria-Hungary, and Turkey, plus persistent meddling in their affairs by West European powers. The battle for independence affected, and was affected by, such issues as Romania's quest for progress, its internal civil rights, and its relations with other Balkan nationalities. In tracing the complicated interaction of these elements, Frederick Kellogg explores the development of Romanian railroads and trade, Romanian anti-Semitism, and Balkan nationalism and Bulgarian revolutionary currents. Russia's war against Turkey and the subsequent peace agreements brought about constitutional change and territorial sacrifice for Romania, along with annexation between the lower Danube River and the Black Sea. Using sources cuffed from little-known Romanian and other European archives and libraries, Kellogg convincingly explains why and how the powers interacted with one another and with Romania, and how Romanian political leaders responded to provocations and opportunities throughout the momentous passage to independent statehood.
Homeland security has occupied the news since 9/11. Still, much of the research about security risks, types of threats, and other vital data remains unsubstantiated. Using the tools that verify scientific finding, the editors have moved the issues of homeland security to a level above rhetoric and hearsay. Authors, in this volume, review the current literature, critique current information, and provide suggestions for future research in several areas. Topics in this volume include: Risk and Crisis Communication Strategies in Response to Bioterrorism; Security Issues in Water Infrastructure; Fundamental Causes of International Terrorism; Understanding, Measuring, Modeling, and Management of Risks to Homeland Security; Biosensors for Detection of Nerve Agents and Agricultural Pesticides; Detection of Bacterial Pathogens and Toxins; Anti-crop bioterrorism; and Medical Biosurveillance. This volume is a must for all who are involved with issues of homeland security from planners to administrators to researchers. The editors of this volume are members of the Purdue Homeland Security Institute, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana except Daniel R. Dolk who is at the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California.
This volume contains three sections of essays which examine the role of commemoration and public celebrations in the creation of a national identity in Habsburg lands. It also seeks to engage historians of culture and of nationalism in other geographic fields as well as colleagues who work on Habsburg Central Europe, but write about nationalism from different vantage points. There is hope that this work will help generate a dialogue, especially with colleagues who live in the regions that were analyzed. Many of the authors consider the commemorations discussed in this volume from very different points of view, as they themselves are strongly rooted in a historical context that remains much closer to the nationalism we critique.
The history of the Habsburg Monarchy and Austria in the early modern period continues to capture the interest of many scholars. This collection of essays by twenty leading authorities from the United States, Austria, Germany, Great Britain, and the Netherlands focuses on the interplay between the Habsburg government and a multiplicity of social aspects. As a whole, State and Society in Early Modern Austria reexamines and sometimes debunks old views about the Habsburg Monarchy and provides insight into the current historical thinking on the early modern state. Moreover, this broad focus will help the reader understand the complex cultural heritage of the turbulent nationalities of East Central Europe.
Mohamoud's work considers the underlying causes for the breakdown of the state across both time and space. Time is considered across the triple history - the pre-colonial, colonial and post colonial processes. Space is used in the sense of taking the whole of Somalia as a unit of analysis. This approach enables the discovery of different structural crises over a period of time and examines these cumulative effects on the current upheavals in Somalia. Among the approaches, State Collapse and Post-Conflict Developments in Africa covers the constraints in the harsh material environment; the subsistence pastoral mode of existence; the colonial intervention and the subsequent division of the land into five parts; Cold War geopolitics; decades of armed struggles; and the post-colonial crisis of governance.
New York Public Intellectuals and Beyond gathers a variety of distinguished scholars, from Eugene Goodheart to Peter Novick to Nathan Glazer, from Morris Dickstein to Suzanne Klingenstein to Ilan Stavans, to revisit and rethink the legacy of the New York intellectuals. The authors show how a small New York group, predominantly Jewish, moved from communist and socialist roots to become a primary voice of liberal humanism and, in the case of a few, to launch a new conservative movement. Concentrating on Lionel Trilling as the paradigmatic liberal intellectual, the book also includes thoughtful reconsiderations of Irving Howe and Dwight MacDonald, and explores the roots of the neoconservative movement and its changing role today.
These four essays by Howard Jones, R. J. M. Blackett, Thomas Schoonover, and James M. McPherson reconsider why the Confederacy never received the foreign aid that it counted on, and trace the war's impact upon European and Latin nations and dependencies. The book provides fresh perspectives regarding Britain's refusal to recognize the Confederacy, the role abroad of pro-Union African-American lecturers, French emperor Napoleon III's intervention in Mexico, and the Civil War's meaning to peoples all over the world.
This volume addresses the challenges faced by value-added networking and innovation, both for firms' strategies and public policies in a context increasingly influenced by dynamics of interacting networks that underlie knowledge, creation, diffusion, and utilization. Part one deals with national institutions and policies to support science, networking, and innovation, ranging from legislation affecting university business relationships, national support systems for high-technology firms, to systems through which country brands can be developed. Part two addresses the need for value-added learning by local and regional governments concerning the building of an innovation system and the adoption of new ICT applications in cities. Part three focuses on firms, their management and strategies, and their performance in terms of innovativeness and growth.
In Virginia's Native Son, the election of L. Douglas Wilder in Virginia represents the first and only time an African-American has been elected Governor in the United States history. The book hits on five main points of his election and administration (an analysis of the campaign victory, the media's response to the campaign, the racism involved with the election and administration, the administration itself, and the legacy of the administration
Our dominant culture continues to celebrate blind economic expansion despite its heavy toll on people and nature all over the globe. In fact, our national income accounts (such as the GDP) and our policies ignore that much of today's economic income stems from liquidating our social and natural assets. While living on the planet's capital, rather than on the interest (or sustainable harvest) of its renewable assets, we operate as if we could transgress ecological limits forever. Rather than acknowledging this ecological reality, we actively resist recognizing biophysical limits and use wealth to temporarily shield ourselves from the fallout of ecological over-shoot. This study addresses the core question of sustainability and shows why nations will also secure their future competitiveness if they improve their ecological performance. Taken together, all the countries studied consume approximately one-third more ecological services than their available ecological capacity can provide, suggesting that the global economy as a whole is poorly positioned for future competition. Still we find that the European countries, Japan , and Canada (this last because of its large ecological remainder) are in distinctly more favorable starting positions for future competitiveness than all the other countries. They are better at using fewer resources to produce commodities, and, in the case of the countries with ecological remainders, they take better care of their existing ecological capacities. Perhaps the most significant-cant finding is that 16 of the 20 eco-efficiency leaders (about 80 percent) are competitive, compared to only 11 of the 24 eco-efficiency laggards (about 45 percent). This suggests either that eco-efficiency already offers a competitive edge or that competitiveness and high eco-efficiency are not mutually exclusive.
In the late 1970s, Brazil was experiencing the return to democracy through a gradual political opening and the re-birth of its civil society. Writing Identity examines the intricate connections between artistic production and political action. It centers on the politics of the black movement and the literary production of a Sao Paulo-based group of Afro-Brazilian writers, the Quilombhoje. Using Pierre Bourdieu's theory of the field of cultural production, the manuscript explores the relationship between black writers and the Brazilian dominant canon, studying the reception and criticism of contemporary Afro-Brazilian literature. After the 1940s, the Brazilian literary field underwent several transformations. Literary criticism's displacement from the newspapers to the universities placed a growing emphasis on aesthetics and style. Academic critics denounced the focus on a political and racial agenda as major weaknesses of Afro-Brazilian writing, and stressed, the need for aesthetic experimentation within the literary field. Writing Identity investigates how Afro-Brazilian writers maintained strong connections to the black movement in Brazil, and yet sought to fuse a social and racial agenda with more sophisticated literary practices. As active militants in the black movement, Quilombhoje authors strove to strengthen a collective sense of black identity for Afro-Brazilians.