Purdue and Indiana

Like pearls threaded one-by-one to form a necklace, five women successively nurtured students on the Purdue University campus in America’s heartland during the 1930s to 1990s. Individually, each became a legendary dean of women or dean of students. Collectively, they wove a sisterhood of mutual support in their common—sometimes thwarted—pursuit of shared human rights and equality for all. Dorothy C. Stratton, Helen B. Schleman, M. Beverley Stone, Barbara I. Cook, and Betty M. Nelson opened new avenues for women and became conduits for change, fostering opportunities for all people. They were loved by students and revered by colleagues. The women also were respected throughout the United States as founding leaders of the Coast Guard Women’s Reserve (SPARs), frontrunners in the National Association of Women Deans and Counselors, and pivotal members of presidential committees in the Kennedy and Nixon administrations. While it is focused on changing attitudes on one college campus, The Deans’ Bible sheds light on cultural change in America as a whole, exploring how each of the deans participated nationally in the quest for equality. The story rolls through the “picture-perfect,” suppressive 1950s; explores the awakening 1960s of women’s liberation; describes the challenging 1980s, with AIDS and alcohol epidemics; and sails into the twenty-first century as a United States Coast Guard cutter is named after Dorothy Stratton and commissioned by First Lady Michelle Obama. As each woman succeeded the other, forming a five-dean friendship, they knitted their bond with a secret symbol—a Bible. Originally possessed by Purdue’s first part-time Dean of Women Carolyn Shoemaker, the Bible was handed down from dean to dean with favorite passages marked. The lowercase word “bible” is often used in connection with reference works or “guidebooks.” The Deans’ Bible is just that, brimming with stories of courageous women who led by example and lived their convictions.
The Amish Schools of Indiana studies the history of the Old Order Amish parochial school movement in Indiana from its beginnings in 1948 through the 2001 2002 school year. Included in the work are complete descriptions of buildings and grounds, as well as descriptive essays on the pupils and their teachers, the curriculum, the values that are taught, and the religious community that surrounds and supports the school. Readers are invited into the school at numerous points, to sit in on classes, school programs, and impromptu celebrations, as they read anecdotal accounts of real experiences. While preserving the anonymity and Amish proscription against posed pictures, the book makes generous use of photographs to document the current state of Old Order Amish education in Indiana.
Great people lead great universities. Purdue University is fortunate to count its thirteenth faculty member, William Carroll Latta, as one of those people. Certainly, thirteen proved to be a lucky number for Purdue and agriculture in Indiana. This book recounts William Latta's far-reaching influence on agriculture at the university, throughout Indiana, and on a national level. Recognized as the Father of the School of Agriculture and of Extension at Purdue, Latta was an early and tireless promoter of the university and what it could do for the people of the state. From developing the four-year agriculture program, to conducting practical agricultural research prior to the creation of Purdue's Agricultural Experiment Station, to leading Purdue's agricultural outreach efforts to bring the university to the people, Latta's contributions are still evident in Purdue's modern-day agricultural programs. Latta's story traces the history of agriculture at Purdue, showing agriculturists, historians, and the Purdue community where we've been and the foundation upon which we continue to build today's teaching, research, and Extension programs.
A biography of noted businessman John Purdue (1802-1876), whose donations of time and money led to the founding of Indiana's land grant university-Purdue University-in 1869. Purdue also contributed to economically important bridge, railroad, and cemetery construction, the existence of Lafayette Savings Bank and the Battle Ground Collegiate Institute, cattle farming, Lafayette's public school system, and countless other worthy enterprises. To date there has been no published full length study of Mr. Purdue's life and work beyond casual street?talk that portrayed Purdue as a difficult individual with whom to work. This biography incorporates research efforts by previous writers with facts gleaned from newspaper coverage, official documents, and a few rare samples of Mr. Purdue's letters. In this way, a complete picture of the man and myth is generated.
Virginia Claypool Meredith's role in directly managing the affairs of a large and prosperous farm in east-central Indiana opened doors that were often closed to women in late nineteenth century America. Her status allowed her to campaign for the education of women, in general, and rural women, in particular. While striving to change society's expectations for women, she also gave voice to the important role of women in the home. A lifetime of dedication made Virginia Meredith "the most remarkable woman in Indiana" and the "Queen of American Agriculture." Meredith was also an integral part of the history of Purdue University. She was the first woman appointed to serve on the university's board of trustees, had a residence hall named in her honor, and worked with her adopted daughter, Mary L. Matthews, in creating the School of Home Economics at Purdue University.
Virginia Claypool Meredith's role in directly managing the affairs of a large and prosperous farm in east-central Indiana opened doors that were often closed to women in late nineteenth century America. Her status allowed her to campaign for the education of women, in general, and rural women, in particular. While striving to change society's expectations for women, she also gave voice to the important role of women in the home. A lifetime of dedication made Virginia Meredith "the most remarkable woman in Indiana" and the "Queen of American Agriculture." Meredith was also an integral part of the history of Purdue University. She was the first woman appointed to serve on the university's board of trustees, had a residence hall named in her honor, and worked with her adopted daughter, Mary L. Matthews, in creating the School of Home Economics at Purdue University. This text refers to the leatherbound special edition.
In the most comprehensive biographical study of John Purdue (c. 1802-1876) to date, Purdue's great-great-grandniece describes her travels to the diverse places where Purdue had lived in order to learn about the mysterious relative known in her family as "Uncle". Using fresh, unpublished source materials-including Purdue's personal correspondence, business ledgers, and the family oral histories-the author examines Purdue's beginning among illiterate, immigrant, Pennsylvania mountain-hollow folks. Uncle challenges a commonly held belief that Purdue was a cold-hearted business mogul. Instead the author shows Purdue as a human being and as a generous family man with a visionary nature.
Through newspaper accounts, public documents, and a talent for deduction, author Robert Kriebel places Helen Gougar against a background of local, state, and national history and draws a verbal portrait of this nineteenth century woman of amazing wit and determination who battled vicious social and political forces to, eliminate problems, many of which continue to beset humanity in the twentieth century.