Veterinary Studies

Fully up-to-date and packed with useful tips and helpful insights, this publication provides a comprehensive overview of the admission process for the national and international veterinary schools that are members of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC). As the official guide to getting into vet school, it provides hundreds of pages of must-have information, essential to achieving your goal of becoming a veterinarian.   The heart of the book is a directory of member schools, providing for each one the following information: a summary of application procedures; requirements for application and residency; prerequisites for admission; deadlines for each component of the application process; description of campus and campus life; and cost of tuition and fees. Full-page spreads provide a complete profile of the different campuses and clearly lay out all the details you need to select the school that matches your needs best.   Additional information includes an overview of the Veterinary Medical College Application Service (VMCAS), information about the accreditation of veterinary schools and professional licensure as a veterinarian, a helpful timeline for aspiring vets from high school onward, and firsthand accounts from current students and practitioners about what it’s like to train as a vet. The book provides the best concise, current, and comparative information for those students interested in preparing for a career in veterinary medicine, as well as their advisors and counselors. It is the essential guide to becoming a DVM.   As Executive Director of AAVMC Dr. Andrew McCabe writes, “These are exciting times for veterinary medicine, a profession that bridges animal, human, and ecosystem health. We understand that getting started and making sense of all the choices and requirements can be challenging, but you’ve come to the right place by accessing this publication, which provides the essential information you need to begin your journey.”  
Afternoons with Puppy is a heartwarming account of dynamic relationships and outcomes involving a therapist, his therapy animals, and his patients over the course of almost two decades. It is a narrative of Dr. Fine's experiences and the growing respect for the power of the animals effect on his patients and himself.
This book is the first of its kind to discuss in detail the actual management of local animal control programs as opposed to the care of the animals. The book covers those financial, personnel, legal, health, and safety issues that animal control directors and management staff need to know in providing direction and oversight of animal control programs.   Chapters examine selected topics in which the author assesses the strengths and weaknesses, offers new insights and strategies for managing more effectively. For example, the two chapters on contracting discuss the steps in the process, strategies, and suggested provisions in the written agreement to make the program more effective. The animal law chapters explain the basis for the laws, but also highlight those provisions that if enacted into law, can strengthen enforcement options. The chapter on budget and revenues explains funding variations among programs and how local officials have been creative in financing these programs.   Subjects addressed in this book include many recently recognized as vital to the management of animal control programs. They include: need for Web sites, use of program evaluations, and the value of forms, records and reports. In addition, the author discusses and assesses from a new perspective: interacting with the public and the media, liability issues, wildlife problems, and the politics of animal control.  
Growing literature around the benefits of animal-assisted intervention (AAI) spurs health care professionals and administrators to start new programs. Yet the trend also raises questions of how best to begin and run successful AAI programs—under what circumstances, with what staff, and within what guidelines. Animal-Assisted Interventions in Health Care Settings: A Best Practices Manual for Establishing New Programs succinctly outlines how best to develop, implement, run, and evaluate AAI programs. Drawing on extensive professional experiences and research from more than fifteen years leading the Center for Human-Animal Interaction in the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, the authors discuss both best practices and best reasons for establishing AAI programs. For thorough consideration, the text explores benefits from a variety of perspectives, including how AAI can improve patient experience, provide additional career development for staff, and contribute favorably to organizational culture as well as to the reputation of the facility in the surrounding community. Developed for administrators as well as for volunteers and staff, Animal-Assisted Interventions in Health Care Settings includes practical, case-based examples for easy comprehension and offers user-friendly templates that can be adapted to develop practice-specific training, evaluation, and procedure manuals.
The integration of animals into the therapy setting by psychotherapists has been a growing trend. Psychological problems treated include emotional and behavioral problems, attachment issues, trauma, and developmental disorders. An influential 1970s survey suggests that over 20 percent of therapists in the psychotherapy division of the American Psychological Association incorporated animals into their treatment in some fashion. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the number is much higher today.   Since Yeshiva University psychologist Boris Levinson popularized the involvement of animals in psychotherapy in the 1960s, Israel has come to be perhaps the most advanced country in the world in the area of animal-assisted psychotherapy (AAP). This is true especially in the areas of academic training programs, theory-building, and clinical practice. Great effort has been put into understanding the mechanisms behind AAP, as well as into developing ethical guidelines that take into account the therapist's responsibility toward both client and animal.   This book exposes the world to the theory and practice of AAP as conceived and used in Israel. It emphasizes evidence-based and clinically sound applications with psychotherapeutic goals, as differentiated from other animal-assisted interventions, such as AAE (animal-assisted education) and AAA (animal-assisted activities), which may have education or skills-oriented goals. Not just anyone with a dog can call him- or herself an animal-assisted therapist. This volume demonstrates not only the promise of animal-assisted psychotherapeutic approaches, but also some of the challenges the field still needs to overcome to gain widespread legitimacy.  
Animals in Schools explores important questions in the field of critical animal studies and education by close examination of a wide range of educational situations and classroom activities. How are human- animal relations expressed and discussed in school? How do teachers and students develop strategies to handle ethical conflicts arising from the ascribed position of animals as accessible to human control, use, and killing? How do schools deal with topics such as zoos, hunting, and meat consumption? These are questions that have profound implications for education and society. They are graphically described, discussed, and rendered problematic based on detailed ethnographic research and are analyzed by means of a synthesis of perspectives from critical theory, gender, and postcolonial thought.
Come, Let Me Guide You explores the intimate communication between author Susan Krieger and her guide dog Teela over the ten year span of their working life together. This is a book about being led by a dog to new places in the world and new places in the self, about facing life’s challenges outwardly and within, and about reading those clues—those deeply felt signals—that can help guide the way. It is also, more broadly, about the importance of intimate connection in human-animal relationships, academic work, and personal life.   In her previous book, Traveling Blind: Adventures in Vision with a Guide Dog by My Side, Krieger focused on her first two years with Teela, her lively Golden Retriever-yellow Labrador. Come, Let Me Guide You continues the narrative, beginning at the moment the author must confront Teela’s retirement and then reflecting on the entire span of their working life together. These emotionally moving stories offer the reader personal entrée into a life of increasing pleasure and insight as Krieger describes how her relationship with her guide dog has had far-reaching effects, influencing not only her abilities to navigate the world while blind, but her writing, her teaching, and her sense of self.   Come, Let Me Guide You makes an invaluable contribution to the literature on human-animal communication and on the guide-dog-human experience, as well as contributing to disability and feminist studies. It shows how a relationship with a guide dog is unique among bonds, for it rests upon highly regulated connections yet touches deep emotional chords. For Krieger, those chords have resulted in these memorable stories, often humorous and playful, always instructive, and generative of broader insight.    
The landscapes of violence have become too familiar, too close to home. Despite decades of scientific research, we are only beginning to understand the roots of violence that connect child maltreatment, spouse and partner abuse, and aggression in our neighborhoods and communities. Cruelty to animals is often part of these landscapes of violence-at times, a strong link to destructive interpersonal relationships. Research on this link has recently received increased attention. However, the layperson, student, and professional interested in this link often face the daunting task of locating the critical references in this area of inquiry. Cruelty to Animals and Interpersonal Violence presents in one volume historical, philosophical, and research sources that explore the maltreatment of animals and the ways people hurt each other. Diverse disciplines are represented among the readings, including psychology and psychiatry, criminology, social work, veterinary science, and anthropology. A bibliography of related books and articles is provided for readers who wish to pursue this topic in greater detail.
Veterinary technicians face difficult situations on a daily basis. They dedicate their lives to aiding in the treatment of animals and relieving suffering, serving as each patient’s main advocate and caretaker. The veterinary technician holds a unique role in patient care. Acting as the intermediary between the veterinarian prescribing treatment and the patient, they play a large part in the communication and education of clients. Veterinary technicians have greatly expanded their roles and find themselves not only an integral part of veterinary practice, but in research institutions, animal shelters, and universities as well.   This text explores difficult situations veterinary technicians face on a daily basis through the use of case examples and dialogue. Each case scenario describes a real-life situation for a veterinary technician, poses thought-provoking questions, and provides commentary that focuses on the legal aspect of the scenario, the social or personal ethics of the parties involved, and/or the welfare of the animal(s). The case scenarios encompass clinical situations in a practice setting as well as situations involving business ethics and interpersonal relationships between colleagues.   The case format of the book lends itself to discussion and can be utilized in veterinary technology courses that focus on ethics, communications, management, and leadership. The real-life case examples make the book an enjoyable read for practicing veterinary technicians as well. There currently are over two hundred veterinary technology programs and thousands of practicing veterinary technicians within the United States and Canada.    
Would you like to be a veterinarian? Veterinarians are scientists who are doctors for animals. In this book, you get to be part of the veterinary team by using science to solve cases, learning about careers in veterinary medicine, and seeing how advances in animal health can help people too. Be the VET! Solve the Case!
What has changed in the last twenty-five years in the relationship of Poles with their dogs? How have the free market and capitalism influenced Poland and the human-canine bond there? Are dogs “property,” “friends,” or “members of the family” in post-communist Poland? Free Market Dogs, edited by Michał Piotr Pręgowski and Justyna Włodarczyk, examines the interactions and relationships of dogs and humans in contemporary Polish culture and society, and explores how Poland’s intense exposure to Western—and particularly American—cultural patterns influenced the status of dogs after restoration of democracy in 1989.   This book discusses topics such as the emergence of pet cemeteries, dog memoirs, and presidential dogs in Poland; the growing popularity of dog sports and the feminization of said sports; the philosophical and ideological changes in dog training caused by exposure to state-of-the-art methods from American books and videos; dogs in contemporary Polish art; and the specificity and growing pains of local pet-facilitated therapy.   Free Market Dogs was written by researchers and practitioners whose academic background includes sociology, anthropology, pedagogy, cultural studies, and literary studies, and whose practical experience involves either training dogs or working with them. Based on thorough research and personal expertise, this is a great book for anyone interested in human-canine relationships—and their similarities and differences—around the world.  
Veterinarians have fun and exciting jobs! In this book you will meet veterinarians from all over the world. These veterinarians work hard to make sure people and their animals stay healthy. Maybe one day you will be a veterinarian too!
Veterinary medicine has undergone sweeping changes in the last few decades. Women now account for 55 percent of the active veterinarians in the field, and nearly 80 percent of veterinary students are women. However, average salaries have dropped as this shift has occurred, and even with women in the vast majority, only 25 percent of leadership roles are held by women.   These trends point to gender-based inequality that veterinary medicine, a profession that tilts so heavily toward women, is struggling to address. How will the profession respond? What will this mean for our students and schools? What will it mean for our pets entrusted to veterinarian care? Who has succeeded in these situations? Who is taking action to lead change? What can we learn from them to lead the pack in our lives?   Leaders of the Pack, by Julie Kumble and Dr. Donald Smith, explores key themes in leadership and highlights women in veterinary medicine whose stories embody those themes. In it, Kumble and Smith cull over three years of interviews to profile a wide variety of women as they share triumphs and challenges, lucky as well as tough breaks, and the sound advice and words that inspired them to take their careers in unanticipated directions. By sharing unique stories that illuminate different paths to leadership and reflecting on best practices through commentary and research, Leaders of the Pack will allow more female leaders to create wider pathways to the top of their profession.
From ancient Egypt to modern times, scientists have been learning new ways to prevent, diagnose, and treat cancer. In this book, you’ll learn about cancer and how veterinarians, veterinary technicians, physicians, and other scientists are working together to find a cure for cancer in people and their pets.
This book addresses the continued lack of the diversity in veterinary medicine, the least inclusive of all medical professions. Effective navigation of the complexity of diversity and inclusion in veterinary medicine requires clear enumeration, recognition, and understanding of key issues, challenges, and opportunities. In a nation with rapidly changing demographics, public needs and expectations of the veterinary profession will continue to evolve. A more diverse scientific workforce is required to feed the veterinary profession, not just for the purposed of equity, but as necessity for its sustainability and relevance. The book lays out the history of diversity in the veterinary profession, in the context of historical changes and actions within US society. An overview of selected strategies from dental, pharmacy, and (human) medical schools is then offered. The impact of social constructs on career interest development is explored using the examples of race, gender, sexual orientation, and gender identity. Practical strategies for attracting preschool through undergraduate students to careers in the veterinary profession are presented, as well as metrics and tools to assess the impact of diversity and inclusiveness strategies. A systems approach to diversity and inclusiveness in the veterinary profession is called for in a manner that frames barriers as opportunities for improvement and progress. There is much that needs to happen to achieve professional inclusiveness and cultural competency, but the path to achieving this is clear. System-wide commitment, planning, execution, and continuous assessment will position the profession to better suit the population of the nation and the world that will be served. This book is a call to action for consistent championship and cohesive approaches, and it provides a road map to building a sustainably inclusive future.    
Although scholars in the disciplines of law, psychology, philosophy, and sociology have published a considerable number of prescriptive, normative, and theoretical studies of animals in society, Pet Politics presents the first study of the development of companion animal or pet law and policy in Canada and the United States by political scientists. The authors examine how people and governments classify three species of pets or companion animals—cats, dogs, and horses—for various degrees of legal protection. They then detail how interest groups shape the agenda for companion animal legislation and regulation and the legislative and administrative formulation of anti-cruelty, kennel licensing, horse slaughter, feral and roaming cat, and breed ban policies. Finally, they examine the enforcement of these laws and policies by agencies and the courts. Using an eclectic mix of original empirical data, original case studies, and interviews—and relying on general theories and research about the policy process and the sociopolitical function of legality—the authors illustrate that pet policy is a unique field of political struggle, a conflict that originates from differing perspectives about whether pets are property or autonomous beings, and clashing norms about the care of animals. The result of the political struggle, the authors argue, is difficulty in the enactment of policies and especially in the implementation and enforcement of laws that might improve the welfare of companion animals.    
Today’s therapy-dog handlers recognize the need to be teammates with their dogs. Teaming with one’s dog involves unobtrusively providing physical and emotional support as well as respectful guidance in what to do. Being a teammate requires attention to our own behavior, not just our dog’s. This book reminds all handlers that being conscious of what we do with our dogs helps them do their best work, and also can increase the effectiveness of our visits. Teaming with Your Therapy Dog teaches the STEPs of Teamwork and how those STEPs fit with the Therapy Dog’s Bill of Rights. These general principles free handlers to apply them in their own way to their therapy dog’s individual personality and work, and to everyday life at home! As the author writes, “The book explores a way of being conscious of what you do with and to your therapy dog to support him in his work.  It describes functional principles of behavior you can learn and use immediately, either together as a package or independently.” Using an exciting new methodology, the author guides readers to deepen their relationship with their dogs by acting consciously and respectfully.
This annually updated publication provides a comprehensive overview of the admission process for the national and international veterinary schools that are members of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC). The following need-to-know information is provided for each school: summary of application procedure; requirements for application and residency; prerequisites for admission; deadlines for each component of the application process; description of campus and campus life; and cost of tuition and fees. Additional information includes an overview of the Veterinary Medical College Application Service (VMCAS) and information about the accreditation of veterinary schools and professional licensure as a veterinarian. A fold-out chart provides easy-to-use information about the course prerequisites for different vet schools. The book provides the best concise, current, and comparative information for those students interested in preparing for a career in veterinary medicine, as well as their advisors and counselors.
Completely redesigned and expanded for 2014, this annually updated publication provides a comprehensive overview of the admission process for the national and international veterinary schools that are members of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC), as well as a variety of valuable guidance about how to achieve your goal of becoming a veterinarian. The following need-to-know information is provided for each school: summary of application procedure; requirements for application and residency; prerequisites for admission; deadlines for each component of the application process; description of campus and campus life; and cost of tuition and fees. Full-page spreads provide a complete profile of the different campuses and clearly lay out all the details you require to select the school that best matches your needs.Additional information includes an overview of the Veterinary Medical College Application Service (VMCAS), information about the accreditation of veterinary schools and professional licensure as a veterinarian, and new this year, profiles of veterinary students and practicing veterinarians. The book provides the best concise, current, and comparative information for those students interested in preparing for a career in veterinary medicine, as well as their advisors and counselors. It is the essential guide to becoming a DVM.As Executive Director of AAVMC Dr. Andrew McCabe writes, “These are exciting times for veterinary medicine, a profession that bridges animal, human, and ecosystem health. We understand that getting started and making sense of all the choices and requirements can be challenging, but you’ve come to the right place by accessing this publication, which provides the essential information you need to begin your journey.”  
Fully up-to-date and packed with useful tips and helpful insights, this publication provides a comprehensive overview of the admission process for the national and international veterinary schools that are members of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC). As the official guide to getting into vet school, it provides hundreds of pages of must-have information, essential to achieving your goal of becoming a veterinarian.   The heart of the book is a directory of member schools, providing the following information for each school: a summary of application procedures; requirements for application and residency; prerequisites for admission; deadlines for each component of the application process; a description of campus and campus life; and the costs of tuition and fees. Full-page spreads provide a complete profile of the different campuses and clearly lay out all the details you need to select the school that matches your needs best.   Additional information includes an overview of the Veterinary Medical College Application Service (VMCAS), information about the accreditation of veterinary schools and professional licensure as a veterinarian, a helpful timeline for aspiring vets from high school onward, and firsthand accounts from current students and practitioners about what it’s like to train as a vet. The book provides the best concise, current, and comparative information for students interested in preparing for a career in veterinary medicine, as well as their advisors and counselors. It is the essential guide to becoming a DVM.   As Executive Director of AAVMC Dr. Andrew McCabe writes, “These are exciting times for veterinary medicine, a profession that bridges animal, human, and ecosystem health. We understand that getting started and making sense of all the choices and requirements can be challenging, but you’ve come to the right place by accessing this publication, which provides the essential information you need to begin your journey.”  
Fully up-to-date and packed with useful tips and helpful insights, this publication provides a comprehensive overview of the admission process for the national and international veterinary schools that are members of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC). As the official guide to getting into vet school, it provides hundreds of pages of must-have information, essential to achieving your goal of becoming a veterinarian. The heart of this publication is a directory of member schools, providing the following information for each school: a summary of application procedures; requirements for application and residency; prerequisites for admission; deadlines for each component of the application process; a description of campus and campus life; and the costs of tuition and fees. Full-page spreads provide a complete profile of the different campuses and clearly lay out all the details you need to select the school that matches your needs best. Additional information includes an overview of the Veterinary Medical College Application Service (VMCAS), information about the accreditation of veterinary schools and professional licensure as a veterinarian, a helpful timeline for aspiring vets from high school onward, and firsthand accounts from current students and practitioners about what it’s like to train as a vet. This publication provides concise, current, and the best comparative information for students interested in preparing for a career in veterinary medicine, as well as their advisors and counselors. It is the essential guide to becoming a DVM. As Executive Director of AAVMC, Dr. Andrew McCabe writes: “These are exciting times for veterinary medicine, a profession that bridges animal, human, and ecosystem health. We understand that getting started and making sense of all the choices and requirements can be challenging, but you’ve come to the right place by accessing this publication, which provides the essential information you need to begin your journey.”
Fully up-to-date and packed with useful tips and helpful insights, this publication provides a comprehensive overview of the admission process for the national and international veterinary schools that are members of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC). As the official guide to getting into vet school, it provides hundreds of pages of must-have information, essential to achieving your goal of becoming a veterinarian. The heart of this publication is a directory of member schools, providing the following information for each school: a summary of application procedures; requirements for application and residency; prerequisites for admission; deadlines for each component of the application process; a description of campus and campus life; and the costs of tuition and fees. Full-page spreads provide a complete profile of the different campuses and clearly lay out all the details you need to select the school that matches your needs best.   Additional information includes an overview of the Veterinary Medical College Application Service (VMCAS), information about the accreditation of veterinary schools and professional licensure as a veterinarian, a helpful timeline for aspiring vets from high school onward, and firsthand accounts from current students and practitioners about what it’s like to train as a vet. This publication provides concise, current, and the best comparative information for students interested in preparing for a career in veterinary medicine, as well as their advisors and counselors. It is the essential guide to becoming a DVM.   As Executive Director of AAVMC, Dr. Andrew McCabe writes: “These are exciting times for veterinary medicine, a profession that bridges animal, human, and ecosystem health. We understand that getting started and making sense of all the choices and requirements can be challenging, but you’ve come to the right place by accessing this publication, which provides the essential information you need to begin your journey.”
For a happy relationship with your cat, go beyond the looks and make your pick based on demonstrated breed behavior. This is the advice of the Harts, two experts in animal communication and behavior, whose new book takes the process of selecting a cat to the next level by offering data-based behavioral profiles of a wide range of cat breeds. Developed over a lifetime of research and through extensive interviews with eighty veterinary experts, the profiles are presented in easy-to-use graphical form. A history of the development of different breeds is presented, and then breed-specific differences across a range of variables are discussed. These include twelve behavioral traits, in areas such as affection, sociality, activity level, and litter box use. After giving guidance about choosing a cat, the authors present some strategies for avoiding problem behaviors and resolving those that emerge. They also share fascinating theories about the origins of various common cat behaviors, including purring, yawning, eating grass, “flipping out” on catnip, and staking out territory. While the focus is on purebred cats, there is also lots of good information for owners of blends. The book ends with helpful guidance on further reading. Based on the latest science, this is a great book for anyone interested in the fundamental building blocks of feline behavior, and an invaluable handbook for cat owners.  
This book gathers, in one place, those measures presently used to study the human-companion animal bond. The measures chosen for inclusion are the most heavily used by researchers, as well as measures that appear to be innovative or relate to the different aspects of the human-companion animal relationship. The measures cover the human-animal bond principally by attachment, but also by fear, abuse, or neglect.
This is an authoritative study into a traditionally taboo subject. It is not a work of erotica but presents the works of authorities on the subject. The authors have researched, as far as is possible, those who do, or have indulged in the practices since the beginnings of human history. The book also contains a useful bibliography.