Veterinary Studies

Pets play a greater role in our emotional and physical health than ever before, says the Purdue University professor who is co-author of his revised edition of Between Pets and People: The Importance of Animal Companionship. The book by Alan M. Beck of Purdue's School of Veterinary Medicine and Aaron H. Katcher, psychiatrist and professor emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania, explores the emotional and physical benefits of owning a pet and analyzes the complex relationship between people and pets. "The study of the importance of the relationship between people and animals is a growing field and has the potential to be part of the whole human-health field," says Beck, director of Purdue's Center for Applied Ethology and Human-Animal Interaction. "The social milieu on where animals fit into society has really changed in the last 13 years. We've gone from recognizing the potential of animals being a significant positive contribution to certain populations, such as the elderly, to actual documentation." Beck and Katcher note a 1992 study by an Australian cardiologist of 5,000 people who visited a clinic to find ways to reduce heart disease. The study found that people with pets had lower blood pressure and lower blood fat levels than those without pets, even though the two groups were alike in diet and exercise. The authors also point to the trend by nursing homes to incorporate animals into the routine and environment for patients. For example, in the early 1980s nursing homes typically did not allow pets to visit patients, while today nearly half of the homes have an organized program for animal therapy, Beck says. In addition to exploring physical benefits, the book covers such topics as pets as family members, pets as therapists, talking to pets, and how pets can teach us to become better companions to friends and family. The book also has a list of Web sites by such organizations as Canine Companions for Independence and the American Kennel Club. While pets provide health benefits, they can create problems, Beck and Katcher say. "There is no medicine that doesn't have some side effects," Beck says. For example, more pet ownership has public-health implications such as more dog bites, he notes. And some people whose pets die grieve to the point of illness, he says. But grief over the loss of an animal is not new, Beck says. Ancient Egyptians shaved their eyebrows after their cats died, and the Roman emperor Caligula had his horse entombed.
What happens behind the doors of the animal shelter? This book will introduce the reader to the work culture of animal shelter employees, volunteers, activists, educators, and pets. By weaving together her own personal memoirs with interviews with workers, the author describes the traditions, philosophies, history, and current social dynamics of a typical animal welfare community. She examines how the daily interactions, personal philosophies, disparate methods, technology, and life experiences of the humans and pets influence the care of homeless animals, often playing an intricate role in the life or death situation each pet eventually faces.The author also describes her own experience with a "rescued" dog, touching upon the issues of victimization and redemption that she finds characterize the animal welfare field. The animals in the book are presented as active participants in this daily drama, able to communicate their needs to their caretakers and form lasting impressions. Throughout the book, workers, volunteers, and activists tell their own stories-stories that embody the hopes, frustrations, successes, and failures in bridging the bond between homeless pets and new families.
Brood Bitch is a mother's reflection inspired by her hand-raising a litter of Pembroke Welsh corgis whose own mother died after a Caesarian delivery. Devastated by the loss of her only companion and awed by the task of saving the puppies, the author is surprised to discover she enjoys this exclusive commitment. With an education, a career, a marriage, and mothering all behind her, Wells broods on these past commitments-usually conflicted-in light of her success in the role of a canine mother. Parallels between the birth and care of the puppies and her daughter keep coming to her consciousness, helping her to understand her sense of failure as a human mother. However, nurturing the puppies leads to profound introspection, which eventually heals the pain of her insecure mothering. The experience also enables her to appreciate the vast scope of motherhood in both corgis and women-its variations, illusions, ideals, realities, frustrations, and rewards. Wells realizes that she is a mother for life. Having mothered the litter so happily and bonded so closely with the one she kept, she is able to forge a bond with her daughter through links to their past that extend into the present. Though a slow process that may take most of a life re-lived, rearing the puppies makes it possible for her. Her final recompense is a guarded hope that the lovely young bitch, who never knew her natural mother, will succeed in the role and provide them both with a corgi companion for the rest of their lives. It becomes a reality under conditions even more rewarding than her mothering of this brood bitch because she now recognizes so many of the complications of motherhood. She at last observes a mother superior, whose existence among women requires a vow of celibacy.
"In one instance, an officer investigated a case on an extremely thin dog - a sixty-pound Rottweiler - that should have weighed about one hundred pounds. 'The dog was skin and bones, so weak he couldn't even get up. The person told me he was minding the dog for his son because his son had been away. He'd go out every night at 5:00 and dump food on the ground, and because it was dark, he really couldn't see if the dog was thin. That was his excuse.' The officer told the respondent, 'Listen, it is your house. You agreed to care for the dog.' He even spoke with the son who said his father had been caring for the dog. So the respondent surrendered the dog and it was euthanized by a veterinarian. "It was too far gone. We had to carry it on a stretcher. It was unbelievable. It was really bad. The dog also had a large abscess on its left ear that looked like it was infected. So I charged him with animal cruelty - failure to provide necessary sustenance.'" -- How do animal cops cope with a doubting public and still face the abuse they see? -- Why do the courts brush aside many cases of cruelty when the link between interpersonal violence and animal abuse is undeniable? -- Why does society view animal cops as wannabes or second-rate cops?Arnold Arluke, a senior research fellow at the Tufts Center for Animals and Public Policy and a professor of Sociology and Anthropology at Northeastern University, has produced a book that looks at attitudes in action as he follows animal cops on their daily routes and routines, emotional highs and lows, and from the mundane to the macabre. "[A] richly textured, and at times deeply disturbing, ethnography of the occupational practices, roles, and ideologies of humane law enforcement officers as they encounter, investigate, and prosecute incidents of animal cruelty." -- Qualitive Sociology Review"...offers a crucial perspective that is ignored in the prescriptive calls for animal rights." -- Law and Politics Review
When the Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine was founded fifty years ago, it would have been hard for the instructors and administrators who taught in makeshift classrooms and laboratories to imagine all of the accomplishments that would be born from their pioneering spirit. Learn when: the first women graduated from the school; the Veterinary Technology Program was established; the Purdue Comparative Oncology Program was founded by the Veterinary Medicine faculty; the School offered DVM students choices for specialization, including small animal, large animal, and equine medicine. This book gives an insider's view into the birth and growth of the Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine. From those early days-when veterinary care was primarily for draft and coach horses- to today's comparative medicine programs that benefit both humans and animals. This book details how the school has continuously provided excellent education and care.
Animal abuse has been an acknowledged problem for centuries, but only within the past few decades has scientific research provided evidence that the maltreatment of animals often overlaps with violence toward people. The variants of violence, including bullying or assaults in a schoolyard, child abuse in homes, violence between adult intimate partners, community hostility in our streets and neighborhoods, and even the context of war, are now the subject of concerted research efforts. Very often, the association of these forms of violence with cruelty to animals has been found. The perpetrators of such inhumane treatment are often children and adolescents. How common are these incidents? What motivates human maltreatment of animals? Are there cultural, societal, neighborhood, and family contexts that contribute to cruelty to animals? How early in a child's life does cruelty to animals emerge and are these incidents always a sign of future interpersonal violence? Are there ways of preventing such cruelty? Can we intervene effectively with children who already have a history of abuse and violence?Children and Animals: Exploring the Roots of Kindness and Cruelty presents the current scientific and professional wisdom about the relation between the maltreatment of animals and interpersonal violence directed toward other human beings. However, the author, Frank R. Ascione, a noted expert in these areas, writes in a style and presents the findings in language that will be understandable to parents, teachers, counselors, clergy, animal welfare professionals, foster parents, mental health professionals, youth workers, law enforcement professionals, and any one else whose work or interest crosses into the lives of children and adolescents.
This readable contribution should be in the hands of any city or state agency dealing with dog problems or with public health problems. The book should also be of considerable interest to all ecologists, behavorists, and biologists."-Choice"This is a unique book in which the ecologist's methods are applied to understanding and possibly solving one of our urban problems."-Library Journal"This fascinating small monograph is the work of a man who-armed with camera, tape recorder and thermometer and driving not a Land-Rover but a used sedan-studied free-ranging dogs among the bricks of Baltimore."-Scientific American
In The Golden Bridge, Patty Dobbs Gross provides both personal and professional advice on how specially bred and trained dogs help to facilitate communication for children with autism and other developmental disabilities. This important information compendium is a guide for parents dealing with the social, emotional, and educational issues of raising children with challenges. Myths and labels concerning autism are explored, examined, and redefined. While focused on children, the advice that Gross shares will be immensely helpful for anyone involved in breeding, raising, and training dogs to mitigate any type of disability at any age.The Golden Bridge provides advice about living with autism, animal-assisted therapy and autism, training an assistance dog to work with a child with autism or a developmental disability, and using an assistance dog to deal with a child's grief. This impressive volume also contains a vast list of resources, including web sites, for follow-up information, a section on books about autism, and a directory of assistance dog providers.
"Scientists have fun and exciting jobs! In this book, you will meet scientists from all over the world who work with animals. These scientists work hard to make sure people and their animals stay healthy. Maybe one day you will be a scientist too! You can start your science training now by completing the activities in this book."This activity book highlights how eight people became scientists. Published in full color, the book features fun activities relevant to the different scientific specialties represented for children to complete. The publication of the book has been supported by the National Institutes of Health, the National Center for Research Resources, and a Scientific Education Partnership Award. An online version is available free of charge to download and print at: http://www.purdue.edu/svmengaged/docs/SEPA/3rd-Grade-Activity-Book-LoRes...
  Mention the words “Seeing Eye,” and most people will associate them with guide dogs for the blind and partially-sighted. Mention the name “Dorothy Harrison Eustis,” and most people will not recognize it, even though she is the woman responsible for founding The Seeing Eye, the first guide dog school in the United States.   Since its inception eighty years ago, The Seeing Eye has trained thousands of people who are visually impaired to use guide dogs. The success of the program has spawned guide dog schools across the country and around the world, and the concept has been further expanded to include service dogs for people with other kinds of disabilities.   Drawing on correspondence, private papers, and newspaper accounts of the day, Miriam Ascarelli chronicles the life of Dorothy Harrison Eustis from her upper class childhood in Victorian Philadelphia to her years as a young mother in the upstate New York boomtown of Hoosick Falls, her widowhood, her failed second marriage to a man thirteen years her junior, and the confluence of events that led to her launching The Seeing Eye. In doing so, Ascarelli reveals both a driven woman and a very private person who shunned media coverage of herself but actively courted it for her organization.  
Inside Animal Hoarding profiles one of the largest and most intriguing cases of animal hoarding in recent history. Celeste Killeen's investigation pries open the door to Barbara Erickson's hidden and closely guarded life, offering an in-depth view of animal hoarding. The chaos and torment discovered by local officials who'd responded to a ramshackle farmhouse in eastern Oregon was described as otherworldly, unbelievable. But, it was only the sad ending to a lifelong story of betrayal, abuse and abandonment. This in-depth look at how animal hoarding developed in one woman's life offers the rich detail and context so important in understanding how to recognize and respond to it and maybe even prevent it. Dr. Arnold Arluke's discussion follows the Erickson story with current research on animal hoarding and how it ties into the Erickson case. Drawing from his background in sociology and extensive study of the human/animal relationship, Arluke offers further insight about animal hoarders, how they see themselves, how society deals with them, and why people find them so perplexing. This integration of investigative journalism and scholarship offers a fresh approach with appeal to a broad audience of readers, those new to learning about the phenomenon, and those with first-hand experience in the animal welfare field.
It's hard to imagine eight million people trying to avoid dog refuse on the streets of New York City on a daily basis. Likewise, it's harder not to imagine New Yorkers from all walks of life picking up after their canines. Using plastic bags or trendy, mechanized devices, pet owners have become a unified force in cleaning up the sidewalks of the Big Apple. Not long ago, picking up after your Poodle, Puli, or Pekinese was not a basic civic duty. Initially, many politicians thought the idea was absurd. Animal rights activists were unanimously opposed. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals condemned the proposed legislation because it would impose undue hardship on dog owners. New York's Poop Scoop Law chronicles the integration of dog owners, a much-maligned subculture, into mainstream society by tracing the history of the legislation that the York's City Council shelved twice before, then Mayor Ed Koch was forced to go to the state level for support. Brandow shows how a combination of science and politics, fact and fear, altruism and self-interest led to the adoption and enforcement of legislation that became a shining success.  
Dogs know when we are feeling down. They love it when we are happy and seeking friendship and fun, and they understand when we are feeling sad and desperate. This book presents a series of real-life tales of the positive effects dogs have had on people at the end of their lives, chronicling the visits by two therapy dogs, Woody and Katie, to patients in a south Florida hospice facility. Through twenty-one stories, infused with humor amidst the sadness, Michelle Rivera, an experienced animal therapist, explores the many ways in which animals can ease human suffering. Her book begins with the deeply personal story of her own mother Katherine’s illness and dying appeal to have the company of a dog, and proceeds to tell the stories of patients young and old who the author was inspired to visit with her “hospice hounds.” As well as demonstrating many of the techniques of animal therapy, Rivera argues powerfully that not allowing pets in health care facilities is a counterproductive policy that deprives patients of comfort at the time they need it most. Some of the stories were previously published in Hospice Hounds (2001), but the author has substantially expanded her introduction and added an invaluable final section that gives practical tips on training and certifying your dog to be a therapy animal.
On temporary assignment in Houston, Texas, at the start of 1998, Aleksandra and her husband, Norman, never expected that their lives would be changed forever when a small, chocolate-gold-black, stray cat stalked into the apartment complex where they were living and adopted them. Suzy soon became a key family member and travels extensively with the author. In a life full of animals, Suzy's owners have had to confront many of the dilemmas that cat ownership entails. This is the story of a deepening relationship between a couple and their cat, written by an award-winning author and filled with insightful comments about cat behavior and the nature of the human–feline bond. The episodes in this book will delight and inform other "cat people" and will leave readers with a new understanding of the way interactions with animals transform our lives.
A child can't be owned, but parents are legally responsible for their child's care. A painting and a dog can be owned; both fall under the jurisdiction of the law and in particular, property rights. But why should a dog, man's best friend, an animal with a mind and emotions, fall under the same category as a painting? How could the law be so foolish? Requiring legal guardianship for animals would have radical consequences for how we live our lives.
The relationship between dogs and humans has been represented and contemplated since the beginning of human culture. Lasting expressions of this interest can be found in art, philosophy, literature, and science. With the rise of biological and social sciences in the nineteenth century, disciplinary frames of analysis have increasingly been brought to bear on this topic. These include, among others, evolutionism, biology, genetics, psychology, ethology, anthropology and sociology, with a more recent trend toward interdisciplinary treatments.At present, there is a large body of scientific literature about the relationship between humans and dogs based upon primarily biological, genetic and psychological approaches. It is only within the past decade that sociologists have shown a concerted interest in the social organization of dog-human interaction, and Playing with My Dog Katie is an example of this movement. This unique contribution to the literature-- an in-depth case study of a single dog and her guardian (the author) at play uses an "ethnomethodological" approach, an important aspect of the research is providing the reader with various kinds of data-in written, photographic and video formats-in order to display the phenomenon of play as ordinary, mundane practice. Based upon these data, various theoretical, methodological and empirical issues regarding our understanding of dog-human play are explored. Some of these include: anthropomorphism and anthropomorphic language, the social organization of different 'kinds' (guardian, guide-dog, working dog) of dog-human relationships, the conceptualization of play as an interspecies activity, and intersubjectivity (loosely meaning mutual understanding) between dogs and humans.
Although The Bahamas is not alone, either in the Caribbean, or elsewhere in having a pet over-population problem, however this publication appears to be the first to provide a systematic study of dog ownership in a Caribbean society. The dog population in The Bahamas consists mainly of mongrels, called "potcakes" a term unique to the greater Bahama archipelago. The fact that Bahamians have lived with potcakes so long has given them an accepted place in society, and they are considered part of the country's heritage. The word "potcake" as entered common usage and has evolved to have associations beyond that with dogs. The Bahamian perceptions of "pet" and "responsible pet ownership" are discussed to allow surveys of perceptions of residents towards dogs and attitudes towards the sterilization of pets to be understood in context. Dog bite data are examined over the last decade and considered in the light of the ever-increasing number of "image" dogs such as rottweilers, German shepherds and pit bulls which are seen at veterinary clinics and interact with the potcake population.. The final chapter draws the threads together from previous sections to show how all members of society, dog owners, non-dog owners and the authorities, need to work together in order for the dog population to be controlled and dog welfare enhanced.
Whether you're hiking with your canine friend in a remote area or work with a dog on a search-and-rescue team or police force, you need to be prepared for emergencies when veterinary service is not available. Rescuing Rover: A First Aid and Disaster Guide for Dog Owners provides dog owners, handlers, and emergency physicians with an understandable guide for safe treatment until the dog can be transported to a veterinarian. Although a number of books describe some techniques for the emergency care of dogs, there is no single illustrated summary that is as practical. With its concise, easy-to-read instructions, detailed and beautifully rendered illustrations, and convenient format, this book covers such common medical procedures as bandaging an ear and constructing a makeshift muzzle. Written in consultation with canine handlers from FEMA, staff from the AAVDM and the Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine, it can also be used as a practical learning guide for veterinary medical and technical students.
Green Chimneys is a nationally renowned US nonprofit organization that helps improve the lives of at-risk urban children by incorporating animals and environmental activities into their educational experiences. Founded by Dr. Samuel (Rollo) B. Ross, Jr.,“Green Chimneys Farm for Little Folk” opened its doors in 1948 with just eleven students. The property has since expanded to cover nearly seven hundred fifty acres in New York, and the school now serves almost two hundred students. Recognized as a worldwide leader in animal-assisted therapy and activities, Green Chimneys provides innovative and caring services for children and their families, as well as the animals with which they spend time. It targets its services at restoring emotional well-being and fostering independence. For over sixty years, Ross developed and operated this innovative and experimental year-round school, and he still remains integrally involved. This book recounts his experiences, sharing a lifetime of practical learning and insights to benefit and inspire all those who work with troubled children, and who believe in the healing power of the natural world.
Obesity is at epidemic levels worldwide. In the U.S. alone, it is estimated that by 2018 the cost of treating weight-related illnesses will double to almost $350 billion a year.  A 2010 report by the U.S. Surgeon General estimates that two-thirds of American adults and almost one in three children are now overweight or obese. Similar statistics emphasize the staggering problem in other industrialized countries. This volume originated in a special 2009 symposium funded in part by a grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Development (NICHD) and sponsorship from Mars-Waltham© on how human-animal interaction may help fight obesity across the lifespan. It provides systematic presentation of the scientific evidence for this powerful expression of the benefits of the human-animal bond. The volume will be especially valuable as a sourcebook of evidence-based studies for public health professionals treating overweight humans and veterinarians treating obese dogs.
Animal abuse as a predictor of abuse against humans has been documented extensively. Society TMs ever-rising violence has prompted experts to ask what alternatives are available to identify the early signs and stop the cycle. The International Handbook of Animal Abuse and Cruelty: Theory, Research, and Application is the authoritative, up-to-date compendium covering the historical, legal, research, and applied issues related to animal abuse and cruelty from scholars worldwide.
The Mark of the Beast historically and critically examines the dire affects of the process of animalization on both humans and animals. Roberts provides a general account of the theoretical division between humans and animals begun largely in the work of Aristotle and continued in that of Descartes and Kant. Following the philosophical provenance of the idea of animality, Roberts explores the practical and "scientific" uses of this idea, focusing largely on what Stephen J. Gould terms the "biodeterministic tradition" by evaluating the primarily ninteenth century theories of atavism, craniology, recapitulation, and so on, while also exploring the use of medical and psychological techniques of animalization.
The Sacrifice provides a uniquely detailed account of the sociological context of animal experimentation. The authors provide a rich analysis of complex and changing role of the laboratory animal in the political and scientific culture of the United States and the United Kingdom. By understanding the interplay of the groups, the authors view the experimental controversy as an ongoing and constantly recreated set of social processes, not just a problem of morality.
What role does an animal play in a child's developing sense of self? This book addresses these and other intriguing questions by revealing the interconnected lives of the inhabitants of the preschool classroom with birds, turtles, bugs, and other creatures. This book provides a delightful and rewarding opportunity for parents, educators, and students of early childhood social development, as well as scholars of the intersection of human experience and the natural environment.
Traveling Blind is a romance, a travel adventure, an emotional quest, and a deeply reflective description of coming to terms with lack of sight. It reveals the invisible work of navigating with a guide dog while learning to perceive the world in new ways. Although an intensely personal account, Traveling Blind is not simply memoir, for it extends beyond one person's experience to illuminate our understandings of vision informed by the academic fields of disability studies, feminist ethnography, and the study of human-animal bonds. What does it mean to "travel blind"? What is it like to live in a world where things are not black and white so much as shades of gray? How does it feel to navigate through constantly changing imagery that requires changing inner perspectives as well? What can experiences of blindness tell us about sight? The book confronts these questions and more. In a series of beautifully textured stories, the author takes the reader on a fascinating journey as she travels with Teela, her lively ""golden dog," through airports, city streets, and southwest desert landscapes, exploring these surroundings with changed sight. This unusual account of travel will inspire the sighted as well as the blind, offering pointed observations on processes of learning to work with a service animal and on coming to terms with a disability. In remarkably visual detail, Krieger makes palpable an ambiguous world. Repeatedly confronted with social stereotypes (that she should be totally blind and incapable of mobility), she comes to value her own unique ways of seeing and her interdependence with both her animal and human companions. Her descriptions of exquisite natural landscapes and intimate personal moments will touch as well as educate readers.   A companion website to this book can be found at: http://susankrieger.stanford.edu/travelingblind/