Beyond Alliances: The Jewish Role in Reshaping the Racial Landscape of Southern California

Beyond Alliances: The Jewish Role in Reshaping the Racial Landscape of Southern California (Hardback)

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 Beyond Alliances: The Jewish Role in Reshaping the Racial Landscape of Southern California
Hardback
Purdue University Press
01/13/2012
164pp
9
Jewish Studies
English
6.00" x 9.00"
1557536236
9781557536235
Available

Book Description

This volume focuses on the special role that Jews played in reshaping the racial landscape of southern California in the twentieth century. Rather than considering this issue in terms of broad analyses of organizations or communities, each contribution instead approaches it by examining the activity of a single Jewish individual, and how he or she navigated the social terrain of a changing southern California. In particular, this volume is one of the first to take seriously the unique racial/ethnic makeup of southern California for Jewish activism, with a particular focus on the relationship between Jews and Mexican Americans in the area around Los Angeles.

 

The Jewish individuals who are this volume’s subjects represent a wide spectrum of backgrounds and perspectives, ranging from an elected official to an activist lawyer, and from a local businessman to a Democratic Party organizer. The volume culminates with an interview with one of the most beloved of local university rabbis, who has been operating in the ever-changing environment of higher education in Los Angeles over the past thirty years.

 

While its overall message is one of optimism, the volume does not shy away from taking on some of the more vexed issues in the scholarship of racial/ethnic interaction. While Jewish activism in shaping local civil rights is thoroughly discussed, the specific and unequal dynamics of power within the civil rights community is also analyzed. The changing relationship of Jews to “whiteness” in southern California during the late twentieth century, in both geographic and political terms, shapes many of these ongoing relationships. Finally, the volume provides a unique historical perspective on our understanding of contemporary Los Angeles in all its ethnic complexity, and specifically in thinking through the future of Jewish role in urban southern California.

Book Reviews

This volume contains four well written and researched articles about Jewish activists and visionaries who took part in the shaping of the political and cultural matrix of Southern California between 1930-1970. This volume is highly recommended for academic libraries that collect in the areas of American Jewish history and culture, Labor Relations and Civil Rights history in America. - Dr. Yaffa Weisman, Director, The Frances-Henry Library, Hebrew Union College-JIR, Los Angeles

About the Editor(s):

Bruce Zuckerman is a professor of Religion at USC, teaching courses in the Hebrew Bible, the Bible in Western Literature, the Ancient Near East, and Archaeology. Professor Zuckerman received his Ph.D. in ancient Near Eastern Languages from Yale University.

George J. Sanchez is a professor of American studies and ethnicity as well as history at the University of Southern California, where he also serves as Vice Dean for Diversity and Strategic Initiatives in the Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences. He is the author of Becoming Mexican American: Ethnicity, Culture and Identity in Chicano Los Angeles, 1900-1945 (Oxford University Press 1993), co-editor of Los Angeles and the Future of Urban Cultures (Johns Hopkins University Press 2005), and Civic Engagement in the Wake of Katrina (University of Michigan Press 2009). Sanchez is currently working on a historical study of the ethnic interaction of Mexican Americans, Japanese Americans, African Americans, and Jews in the Boyle Heights area of East Los Angeles, California, in the twentieth century. He received his BA in history and sociology from Harvard University in 1981 and his PhD in history in 1989 from Stanford University.